Ancient Egypt: Museums offer glimpses of golden past

For the past several years, Nakhte-Bastet-Iru has been taking a rest.

But the 2,800-year-old Egyptian mummy — a priest’s daughter who died at around the age of 20 — will greet throngs of admirers again starting Saturday at the Grand Rapids Public Museum.

Her appearance with 80 or so other artifacts in the “Egypt: Be Curious” exhibit is more or less a warmup for the traveling exhibit “The Discovery of King Tut.” It will bring more than 1,000 reproductions of artifacts excavated from the tomb of King Tutankhamun and arrange them as they were when archaeologist Howard Carter opened the tomb in 1922. Read more.

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Represent: Interactive by Li Sumpter

Inside the Represent Catalogue | Outside the Door

In her essay “Outside the Door” in the “Represent: 200 Years of African American Artcatalogue, consulting curator Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw writes:

“Historically, it has been difficult for artists of African descent who are self-taught or who work in unconventional modes to receive recognition for their work from the mainstream art world. Like their white counterparts, these artists have been referred to by a number of descriptive terms that seek to elucidate their personal experiences with art making or the religious beliefs that inspired the subject matter and the creation of their work.”

“Outside the Door” is the second thematic chapter in the “Represent” exhibition catalogue. It includes references to the works of self-taught African American artists, including Horace Pippin, Jacob Lawrence, Purvis Young, William Henry Johnson, Nellie Mae Rowe, Bill Traylor, Minnie Evans, and Sister Gertrude Morgan. Often depicting the common scenes and collective spirit of the times, creations by such artists were typically labeled “popular” or “folk” art. Curators and collectors considered these works “primitive” compared to the “high” or “fine” art of classically trained artists. Outsider artists continually pushed against the doors of elite art institutions influenced by academia and the politics of affluence. While many of these so-called “visionary” artists of the twentieth century have faded into obscurity, others like the painter Henri Rousseau of France and Edward Hicks of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, have broken through those doors and transcended labels to claim a much-deserved place in museums like the Philadelphia Museum of Art and in the dynamic legacy of African American art.

For the complete “Outside the Door” essay, other writings, and additional “Represent” art available only in the catalogue, pick up your copy in the Museum Store or our online store today.


Blind Singer,” c. 1939–40, by William Henry Johnson

Farm Scene with Cow and Man,” c. 1939–42, by Bill Traylor

The End of the War: Starting Home,” 1930–33, by Horace Pippin

Taboo,” 1963, by Jacob Lawrence (© Estate of Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence/Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York)

In Greek mythology, the sphinx combined the head of a woman, body of a lion and wings of an eagle. Sphinxes often featured on grave markers as guardians of the tomb. The famous sphinx from Thebes was said to wreak terrible vengeance on anyone who failed to solve the riddle she set them. Oedipus solved the puzzle ‘what animal walks on four legs, then two, then three?’ The answer is man, who crawls as a baby, walks upright in his prime, and leans on a staff in old age. This marble sphinx was probably a support for a table. It was found at Monte Cagnolo, outside Lanuvium, near Rome.

You can see this sculpture in our exhibition Defining beauty: the body in ancient Greek art (26 March – 5 July 2015).

You can also find out more about the exhibition in the catalogue by Ian Jenkins

Marble sphinx, probably a support for a table. From Monte Cagnolo, outside Lanuvium, near Rome. Roman, about AD 120–140.

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Go behind the scenes of ‘Mad Men’ at the Museum of the Moving Image, NY

"Mad Men" continues its long goodbye with a comprehensive behind-the-scenes look at the series at the Museum of the Moving Image.

The exhibit features 33 outfits created by award-winning costume designer Janie Bryant for the show’s main characters, shown alongside episode clips featuring the costumes and mood boards created by Bryant.

Visitors can further get drawn into the world of “Mad Men” through recreations of the full sets, including Don and Betty Draper’s kitchen and Don’s office from season four.

Admission details and other info here

DEEP SCREEN

14.03 - 24.05.2015

Jean-Marie Appriou / Cory Arcangel / Bastien Aubry & Dimitri Broquard /

Dewar & Gicquel / Piero Gilardi / Tilman Hornig / Renaud Jerez /

Rachel de Joode / Bevis Martin & Charlie Youle / Marlie Mul /

Owen Piper / Hayley Tompkins / Anne de Vries

Curated by It’s Our Playground at Parc Saint Léger


DEEP SCREEN

14.03 - 24.05.2015


Jean-Marie Appriou / Cory Arcangel / Bastien Aubry & Dimitri Broquard / 

Dewar & Gicquel / Piero Gilardi / Tilman Hornig / Renaud Jerez /

 Rachel de Joode / Bevis Martin & Charlie Youle / Marlie Mul / 

Owen Piper / Hayley Tompkins / Anne de Vries


Curated by It’s Our Playground at Parc Saint Léger