egyption ancient

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Ships on stamps!  Ancient ships on stamps!  And medieval ones, too!  In order: an Egyptian barque, a Phoenician ship, a Greek trireme, a Roman merchantman, the Viking Gokstad, a Prussian cog, a medieval holk, and a Genoese carrack.  Which of these pretty keels would your face like to cause a thousand to be launched by reason of?

Stamp details:
Issued on: January 25, 1965
From: Warsaw, Poland
MC #1562-1569

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Rock Art Draws Scientists to Ancient Lakes | Astrobio.net

Life imitates art. And sometimes science does the same.

Seven thousand year-old rock paintings in the Sahara desert have, somewhat serendipitously, helped uncover evidence of ancient lake beds.

Researchers discovered the mineral remnants of the lake while studying a region well-known for its rock art. The most famous example is the Cave of the Swimmers, which provided a setting in the movie “The English Patient.” The drawings in the cave depict humans that appear to be swimming, floating and diving. And yet this area in southwestern Egypt is one of the driest in the world.

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STATUE DESCRIPTION*

Hatshepsut, the most successful of several female rulers of ancient Egypt, declared herself king sometime between years 2 and 7 of the reign of her stepson and nephew, Thutmose III. She adopted the full titulary of a pharaoh, including the throne name Maatkare, which is the name most frequently found on her monuments. Her throne name and her personal name, Hatshepsut, are both written in cartouches making them easy to recognize.
This life-size statue shows Hatshepsut in the ceremonial attire of an Egyptian pharaoh, traditionally a man’s role. In spite of the masculine dress, the statue has a distinctly feminine air, unlike most other representations of Hatshepsut as ruler. Even the kingly titles on the sides of the throne are feminized to read “the Perfect Goddess, Lady of the Two Lands (Upper and Lower Egypt)” and “Bodily Daughter of Re (the sun god).”

EXCERPT FROM BIOGRAPHY**

Born circa 1508 B.C., Queen Hatshepsut reigned over Egypt for more than 20 years. She served as queen alongside her husband, Thutmose II, but after his death claimed the role of pharaoh while acting as regent to her nephew, Thutmose III. She reigned peaceably, building temples and monuments, resulting in the flourish of Egypt[…] Under Hatshepsut’s reign, Egypt prospered. Unlike other rulers in her dynasty, she was more interested in ensuring economic prosperity and building and restoring monuments throughout Egypt and Nubia than in conquering new lands[…] After her death, Thutmose III erased her inscriptions and tried to eradicate her memory.

* http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/544450
** http://www.biography.com/people/hatshepsut-9331094#death-and-legacy

Hurghada – one day excursion to Cairo

Enjoy a visit to Cairo from Luxor and see the amazing pyramids & Sphinx of ‎Giza, and the prestigious Egyptian museum which has lots of the wonderful ‎artifacts of ancient Egypt. Learn about Coptic Egypt and visit Old Cairo to ‎see the splendid churches such as the Hanging church and then proceed to ‎see Islamic Cairo with its marvelous mosques and great monuments. Enjoy a ‎visit to Cairo from Luxor and see the amazing pyramids & Sphinx of Giza, ‎and the prestigious Egyptian museum which has lots of the wonderful ‎artifacts of ancient Egypt. Learn about Coptic Egypt and visit Old Cairo to ‎see the splendid churches such as the Hanging church and then proceed to ‎see Islamic Cairo with its marvelous mosques and great monuments.‎

Egyptian funerary figurines, known as shabtis, on display in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Most of these date to the New Kingdom period, roughly the 16th to 11th Centuries BC. They are made of materials as diverse as painted wood, painted limestone, sandstone, serpentine and multi-color faience (a quartz based material with properties similar to both glass and pottery). Note the unusual double shabti at upper left, depicting a husband and wife. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

Fact vs Fiction: The Battle of Kadesh

Background:

Ramesses II was the third pharaoh of the Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt. He is also known as Ramesses the Great, and often believed to be the Pharaoh that was reigning when the Exodus occurred, though no documentation of the event exists outside of the Bible.

He was arguably the last Warrior Pharaoh of the dynasty, and undoubtedly one of the most conceited. At the beginning of his reign, he focused on building temples, cities, and monuments to himself, the one “Chosen of Re.” During this time he moved the capital to his city of Pi-Ramesses, where he oversaw military campaigns. 

Ramesses II wished to see many lands Egypt once held within its borders returned. Part of that land had been ceded to the Hittites by his father, Seti I. The two kingdoms’ borders regularly brushed against each other as the kingdoms expanded, and when the king of the Ammonites threw in his allegiance with the Hittites rather than Ramesses II, war became inevitable.  

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