To the Turkish girl (lpninjaebru) who called me filthy Zionist

I don’t know how old you are, but i wanted to show u something and ask

How can u hate us so much, unless u have a heart of stone?

we never do anything to be thanked for. we do it because we believe in love, peace, mutual help etc. The only thing u have to do is not fight us. The least u, and all other haters do, as humans, is to see us for what we really are. i guess you’re too blinded by hatred:

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I ENCOURAGE U TO WATCH
FULL SHORT VERY TOUCHING CLIP HERE:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lBcu-6jPFU

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The Aftershocks
medium.com

I was asked to create a .gif of a house interior during an earthquake. The article chronicles the controversial aftermath of the devastating quake that happened in L’Aquila, Italy in 2009. I wanted to capture the movement of the “tremors” before the full-on earthquake, although this tremor is infinite, never resolving.
This image and the all the animation was made in Photoshop. thanks AD Erich Nagler!

UC Berkeley’s Early Warning System Beat Napa Earthquake by 10 Seconds

Ten seconds before the San Francisco Bay Area started shaking early Sunday morning, an experimental system in a UC Berkeley lab sounded an alarm, counting down to the impending earthquake. The system works through an array of sensors near the fault line which calculate the severity of the quake and broadcast a warning.

It might not seem like much, but even a few seconds notice could allow utilities to shut off gas lines, elevators to let people off at the next floor, and trains to slow down. The USGS cites the benefits a warning could give to a doctor in the middle of performing surgery. In 2012, BART adopted an automatic braking system linked to the program, called Shake Alert.

Read more about UC Berkeley’s earthquake early warning system.

Hammy experienced his first earthquake…
I thought he was scratching the bed - he thought I was shaking him to wake him up. After it ended he snuggled under my arm the rest of the night. Hope everyone in the Napa area is safe!
#mustachecat #earthquake

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In 1906, the seismologist Henry Reid developed the “elastic rebound theory” to explain earthquakes. When rocks begin to press against each other, they initially bend, like a spring, to accommodate the opposing forces. Eventually, when the rocks reach a point where they cannot bend further, they break. The bent rocks snap back, or rebound, to their original shape. The break is the fault itself, and the shock waves emanating from the rebound are the earthquake. The shock waves vibrate through the Earth, making it “ring” like a bell.

A fault is a rock fracture along which movement occurs. Normal faults develop where the crust stretches apart, as in the East African Rift Valley. In thrust faults, which are found at subduction zones, the rocks on one side of the fault are pushed up and over those on the other side. A third type of fault is the strike-slip fault, where the rocks on either side of the fault slip by each other horizontally. The San Andreas Fault is a strike-slip fault.

Learn more about earthquakes in the Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth

Lightning was the major theophany of weather in the Inca religion, and the Incas constructed over a hundred ceremonial platforms and shrines on the summits of the highest mountains in their empire, between 1438 and the Spanish Conquest in 1532.

On 2 August 2014 at precisely 2:58 a.m., a 5.1 earthquake struck, centered at the hilltop lightning Inca huaca: San Catequilla de Pichincha. There have been 57 aftershocks since.

Image: Lightning, by xtremer16. CC-BY-2.0 via Flickr.

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