drillinstructors

Earning the Title on Flickr.

A tear rolls down the cheek of Pfc. Jesus Cardenas, Platoon 3086, Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, after he earned his Eagle, Globe and Anchor emblem and the title Marine on Oct. 25, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Only those imbued with the Corps’ core values can earn the title Marine. Cardenas, 19, from Queens, N.Y., is scheduled to graduate Oct. 31, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Scream It - A recruit of Company A, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, endures the challenges of a senior drill instructor uniform inspection aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, April 5. During inspection recruits are tested on knowledge and bearing.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Benjamin E. Woodle) by United States Marine Corps Official Page http://flic.kr/p/ecygdf

"Sergeant Major Gilbert "Hashmark" Johnson (October 30, 1905 – August 5, 1972) was one of the first black men to enlist in the United States Marine Corps, and one of the first black drill instructors in the U.S. Marine Corps. Johnson was known as “Hashmark” because he had more service stripes than rank stripes. He retired in 1959 after 32 years of service in the U.S. military, 17 years were as a Marine.

Johnson enlisted in the U.S. Army 25th Infantry Regiment in 1923, serving two three-year tours. At the end of his enlistment in October 1929, Johnson was discharged as a corporal.

After four years of civilian life, he decided to try the U.S. Navy. In 1933, he enlisted in the Naval Reserve and was accepted into the Stewards Branch, the only job available to blacks at that time, where he served in the Navy for nearly 10 years. In May 1941, he entered the Regular Navy.

Johnson served aboard the USS Wyoming during the bombing of Pearl Harbor. In 1941 Johnson requested transfer from the Navy to the United States Marine Corps. He went on to serve the last 17 years of his 32-year military career in the Marine Corps. He earned his nickname because during his initial Marine Corps training at Montford Point, he wore three service stripes ‘hashmarks’ on the sleeve of his uniform, indicating his previous enlistments in the Army and Navy.

In 1943, Johnson was among the first black men to be trained as Marine drill instructors. In May 1943, at Montford Point, he replaced drill instructor First Sergeant Robert W. Colwell. As a member of the 52d Defense Battalion on Guam in World War II, Johnson asked that black Marines be assigned to combat patrols, from which they were then exempt. Once approved, he personally led 25 combat patrols.

Edgar Huff, the only other black sergeant major besides Johnson to serve during World War II, was Johnson’s brother-in-law. They were married to twin sisters.” Wiki

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Semper Fidelis Football Program Camp - Oxnard (by LAXMarines)

The Drill Instructors of Oscar Company

Drill Instructor Spotlight

Only about 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. This handful of dedicated DIs is entrusted with sustaining a more than 238-year legacy by transforming men and women into the next generation of Marines. This is one of those drill instructors.

Name: Sgt. Jamie Murray
Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion
Joined Marine Corps in December 2007
Became a DI in June 2013
Military Occupational Specialty: C-130 Electrician
Hometown: Mt. Clemens, Mich.

“I became a drill instructor because I want to better the Marine Corps like everybody else, but I want to change these girls’ lives - to take them from where they may not have felt worth anything where they came from and make them part of the family that we are. They want to do better for the country, and I want to make them better to be better for the country. To make us stronger as a nation through the Marine Corps and instill some type of discipline and pride into these girls so they become proactive women in society.”

Senior drill instructor of Platoon 4003, November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, Sgt. Adrienne Cambridge, shows a recruit a discrepancy during a formal inspection Nov. 23, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits are inspected three times in training, the first two preparing them for the battalion commander’s inspection, their final graduation requirement. Recruits may be set back at this point in training if they do not demonstrate they’re ready to continue training. Drill instructors also ensure their recruits possess attention to detail, bearing, confidence and discipline. Cambridge is a 26-year-old native of Farmington, N.M. November Company is scheduled to graduate Jan. 24, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)

Laboring away … | Recognizing those who continue to sacrifice so much

Today, millions of Americans pause their labors to recognize the nation’s social and economic advancements. However, for some, the work must continue. The drill instructors, recruits and hundreds of other Parris Island staff members will continue their efforts this Labor Day to train the next generation of United States Marines to protect and defend the growth and freedoms of our country. Thank you to all who help our nation flourish. Semper fidelis!

(Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Rct. Joseph Schneider, 18, from Oxford, N.Y., Platoon 2006, Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, provides cover for his buddy Rct. Anthony Palmer, 18, from Orlando, Fla., Platoon 2006, during the day movement course at the combat training area Dec. 11. Recruits traversed the course in “buddy-teams,” providing cover and calling out to one-another while moving. Golf Company is scheduled to graduate Jan. 4.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Michael Rogers

Drill instructors of Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, and Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, march off the main parade deck with their platoons’ guidons during the companies’ graduation ceremony Sept. 13, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The guidons represent teamwork, cohesion and unit identity for each platoon, and are retired during the ceremony. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)

Drill instructors of Bravo Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, and Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, march onto Peatross Parade Deck to retrieve their platoons’ guidons during the companies’ graduation ceremony Nov. 1, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Each guidon is a symbol of cohesion, teamwork and unit identity, and is retired at the end of recruit training. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)