digiteen

Facebook has launched its response to Snapchat, with Facebook Poke, the self destructing message deliverer? Why would you want a message to self destruct or delete itself if a person tried to do a screengrab on their phone? Well, so you can send goofy pics to your friends with no trace left behind! Never fear, however, teenagers are here. They’ve been talking to me about how they get around this - if you’re snap chatting a friend and you have a friend with you - get the friend up close to be ready to take a picture with their camera phone and then post the pic on Facebook that was delivered with Snapchat. They think it is hilarious but admit that this app is also being used as a new way to “flash” others. How long will it take for everyone to learn that you can’t ever really destroy anything any more? If it is done it is permanent - the easiest way to keep private things private is to never do them in the first place. This article goes into more about Facebook poke if you really get into that sort of thing or want to keep up with what the kids are doing.

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“Overexposed” (GRAND PRIZE WINNER of the 2010 Trend Micro Internet Safety Video Competition) (by moohooua)

This video is a great one for sharing the impact social media can have on your job prospects. Share with students.

An interesting guide from edutopia for parents that you can share with your parents and PTO. They share a lot of examples of 21st century learning and as you work to build support for these things, this is a great document to share. (Full Disclosure: The digiteen project is listed for middle school - after this was listed, we saw such an inundation of schools wanting to do the project, we created the DigiTween project for kids aged 10-12 and Digiteen is still for kids aged 13+.) There are a lot of other great sites including the World Peace game, information on Skype in the Classroom, World of Warcraft in School and the Digital Youth Network. Download and share.

The biggest privacy offenders (hat tip Lifehacker podcast) include Facebook, gmail, MSN Live, Skype, Twitter, Dropbox, Google Plus. This demonstrates whoch internet service providers share your personal data without an official court order. If you look at the infographic, you’ll see that Facebook is more than twice the second offender, gmail. Many concerned about privacy are moving to services like PATH for just that reason.