diane-tran

If you let one (truant student) run loose, what are you gonna’ do with the rest of ‘em? Let them go too?
—  Houston judge Lanny Moriarty • On his decision to sentence a 17-year-old honor student, who (since her parents divorced and both skipped town) has had to work both a full and a part time job just to support two siblings, to spend a day in jail, after she missed school recently. Diane Tran, who also takes dual-credit college-level courses, says that she’s often so tired that she finds it difficult to wake up for school. But that didn’t sway Moriarty, who chose to make an example of Tran. If you think this sucks, we direct you to this Change.org petition.
  • Diane Tran, 17, thrown in jail for one night because of repeated absences from school
  • Honours student has been working two jobs to keep family afloat since parents’ divorce
  • Has been taking advanced placement and college courses in addition to jobs and missed school due to exhaustion
  • Spent the night in jail for truancy

Petition for the decision to be overturned here


**EDIT** Update to the story here

A 17-year-old Texas honors student who was jailed for missing too much school because she had to work two jobs to support her siblings, refused to accept the more than $100,000 a website raised for her.

"We saw her trying to work and trying to go to school and trying to do all these things and then to have the judge put her in jail for missing school just seemed a little harsh," said Paul Dietzel, who helped raise the money for Diane Tran. HelpDianeTran.com is a project of the Louisiana Children’s Education Alliance.

But Tran didn’t want the money: “There’s some other kid out there struggling more … than me,” she said.

Class act…

What would you do if your spouse told you they were trans* after years of marriage? While the question is at the heart of the newly released memoir Queerly Beloved by Diane and Jacob Anderson-Minshall, there are so many more layers than this overarching question conveys. Told in varying chapters narrated by Diane and Jacob (Suzy), the reader is brought into the authors’ lives and given a rare, brutally honest glimpse into one couple’s experience dealing with a life-altering transition for both individuals involved.

With chapters titled ‘A Different Kind of Woman?’, ‘The Road to Manhood’, ‘Chest Surgery’, ‘Making It Legal’, ‘Androphobia’, ‘Being Married to a Lesbian Doesn’t Make Me Less of a Man’, ‘The Question of Realness’ and ‘What Keeps Us Together’, among others, the authors lay out the roadmap that took them from a lesbian relationship to lesbian spouses to their current status as husband and wife. The labels here lie at the heart of identity politics, which feature prominently throughout the text, especially for Diane. For someone so indelibly linked to the term “lesbian,” you really get a sense of struggle here that raises many questions for the writers and their readers; if you are a woman married to a woman, identified as a lesbian, when your partner transitions to a man, does that transition impact your identity as well?

 

Diane writes: “Often when women would question me in those early days, asking how I could be a lesbian with a husband, I would ask them, ‘Is your identity tied to your partner’s genitals?’ They’d invariably say no and my fight would be won. I honestly didn’t think my identity needed to change just because his did.” 

Later on, Jacob takes this argument further, writing, “…is the partner of someone who goes through a gender transition required to alter their own self-identification? … If so, how should partners of trans people who haven’t undergone genital surgery identify? Or does your partner’s gender identity or gender expression determine how you should identify?”

The authors both ultimately agree, “It’s not our place to identify someone else as a lesbian or as a straight person or as a bisexual person. It’s completely up to them to decide and verbalize what their sexual orientation is.” 

As a bisexual reading this book, this concept really intrigued me, especially as it flowed through Diane’s sections. She says that she once “tried to claim a bisexual identity,” but her attempt “went over so poorly I never did it again.” While she isn’t specific about “poorly” and what that meant, one can assume that she faced all of the myths, misconceptions and hurtful stereotypes that continue to haunt the bisexual community to this day – non-monogamous, slutty, confused, wanting the best of both worlds, etc. While not the focus of the book per se, the idea of biphobia certainly comes through here, which I was pleased to see as it is an important topic and one that Diane herself further develops when she discusses feeling somewhat invisible in queer spaces after Jacob’s transition. She acknowledges that heterosexual-appearing couples are often unwelcome in LGBTQ spaces, something many bisexual couples can relate to. 

Diane writes that people “couldn’t understand why a presumably straight couple was at a queer bar or representing a lesbian magazine.” Yes, yes and yes. This is a frequent frustration, which causes me to be even more vocal about my own bisexuality when meeting people for the first time. I felt for both Diane and Jacob reading such passages. I’ve been there. I’ve experienced that. I know other bisexuals and those who identify with fluid orientation labels (pansexual, sexually fluid, queer…) will understand as well.

I felt even more for the authors when Diane acknowledged “how often gays and lesbians forget the ‘B’ in LGBTQ. Nearly all the time people treated me like a former lesbian who was now straight, instead of assuming I was a bisexual woman and still validly a part of the LGBTQ world.” 

YES. Thank you, Diane.

While she prefers the terms “queer” and “bisexual-identified lesbian” or “lesbian-identified bisexual” to simply “bisexual,” I responded to so much of what Diane specifically wrote in this book, I found myself highlighting and underlining various passages on most pages throughout. For instance: 

  • “…for many trans people of any gender or sexual orientation, the love of a bisexual (man or woman) is also suspect” (I’d argue for cis people as well!).
  • “In addition to trans people, I’d say that many bisexuals are also still struggling for the greater society, and the LGBTQ community specifically, to recognize their relationships as having the same validity and value as anyone else’s

I believe bisexual readers will enjoy the questions Diane’s experience raises about identity as it pertains to your significant other.

Not only does Queerly Beloved tackle important issues surrounding the topics of gender, identity, orientation and the like, but it gives readers insight into what trans* individuals go through before, during and after their transitions (though Jacob notes more than once that “after” may not be apropos, as many trans* people experience a life-long transition of sorts). Both Diane and Jacob truly write openly and from the heart about their experiences with hormone replacement therapy and top surgery, among other facets of transitioning, revealing the truths and emotions for both sides of a couple going through it. I found myself unable to put the book down once I cracked the spine and would highly recommend it to everyone in the LGBTQ community, as well as those who want to understand gender, sexuality and trans* issues a little better.

- See more at: http://bimagazine.org/index.php/literature/queerly-beloved-a-must-read/#sthash.faeLVD8z.dpuf

Precinct 1 Justice of the Peace Lanny Moriarty, at the Montgomery County District Attorney’s request, signed an order that vacates the contempt of court conviction that sent Diane Tran to jail last week.

The decision clears the way for the issue to be expunged from her record.

The action was taken, in part, after Moriarty looked at the extenuating circumstances that had resulted in Tran missing school and because her court summons had failed to notify her of her right to an attorney or to have one appointed for her, officials said.

The story notes that Tran never brought up her difficult circumstances, which led to this story getting national attention, in court. Either way, we want to wish Tran luck as she continues her education. She works way harder than most folks.

So for those who do not know Diane Tran, she’s a 17 year old vietnamese honor student from Texas who was sent to jail for missing too many days of school.

Diane Tran is honor student who has a full time job plus a part time job to provide the support for her siblings that her parents can’t provide because they’ve divorced and left the states. On top of all this she stays up all night studying for her AP and extra classes.

The judge for a long time did not want to show leniency her in case and I personally believe he picked one of the most worst cases to make an example out of someone.

Diane Tran, your struggle is heard and I just want to let you know that you’ve inspired this song, this one is for you. I don’t know if this song will ever make it to you but if you ever have a chance to come by this blog, you have nothing but love and support from me.

Stay up and continue to be a great big sister.

http://massiah.bandcamp.com/track/drank-in-my-cup-remix-keep-your-head-up



On Diane Tran.

So I’ve been following the news reports on Diane Tran. For those of you who don’t know, she’s a seventeen-year-old honors student from Texas who has been supporting her two siblings by working two jobs after her parents left while still taking on a full AP/college-level courseload. She’s been arrested in open court for truancy and has been sentenced to spending a night in jail as well as a $100 fine. Judge Lanny Moriarty has stated in several interviews that he intends to make an example of her.

Seeing his reasoning, as well as some of the comments left on the Huffington Post page, absolutely infuriate me. It’s idiocy. People have complained that she shouldn’t be prioritizing her jobs over her education and questioned why she’s supporting her—allegedly, since I haven’t heard confirmation one way or the other—older brother in addition to her younger sister when he can help support them as well.

It’s frankly ridiculous to me that people can even think something like this is the appropriate course of action. It doesn’t matter whether or not her brother is legally considered an adult—because he is not choosing to help support her family, she has taken it upon herself to do so because her parents—the people who should be taking care of and supporting her family—are absent. Even if seventeen is the legal age in Texas, her younger sister is still a minor. I fail to understand why the first priority of the state isn’t to find her parents and make them take responsibility for their actions.

Diane is an honors student—she obviously cares about her education, but academic rigor, as I’m sure we all know, is both physically and mentally exhausting. Some of us have missed school for a lot less. Both her school system and the state should be giving her the resources and support she clearly needs but instead, they choose to use her to “set an example.” What example are they setting, exactly? That the State of Texas takes pride in condemning bright, hard-working young people for their efforts to keep the lives of themselves and their families from falling apart?

I really encourage everyone to sign the change.org petition. The kind of action taken by Judge Moriarty and the state is regressive, intolerant, and sets a dangerous precedent for the potential of young people like Diane and those in similar positions.

Watch on nomoretexasgovernorsforpresident.tumblr.com

Diane Tran isn’t like most seventeen-year-old girls her age. Sure, there are many honors students taking dual credit U.S. History, dual credit English Literacy, College Algebra, Spanish Language AP. Sure there are some who work part time and full time jobs like Diane does at a dry cleaners and a wedding venue. But Diane does all of this to support herself and her two siblings.

Diane Tran’s parents divorced and abandoned her family, leaving her the responsibility of providing for them. She is a victim of numerous failures and disappointments by the adults around her. A teacher or authority figure should have reached out to her and made sure she didn’t slip through the cracks, but no one did. Somehow she’s not just an extraordinary worker and student, she’s an extraordinary human being with a fighting spirit.

The reason why we should care about her is this: The state of Texas is sentencing a young girl to a night of jail for being too emotionally and physically exhausted to go to school. The institutions that are to provide resources to youth and ensure justice are punishing her with a $100 fine and a criminal record.

Please tell Judge Lanny Moriarty, the State of Texas, and the U.S.A. to make sure that the future leaders of our nation are looked after and taken care of.

Thank you.

Watch on ukuzihs.tumblr.com

Diane Tran has a lot on her plate for a 17-year-old. After Diane’s parents moved away, Diane stayed behind and started working two jobs to provide for her family — all while taking college-level classes at her high school. But when Diane recently missed school due to exhaustion, she was charged with a crime and sentenced to pay a $100 fine and spend a night in jail

Diane’s classmate, Devin, told reporters that between a full-time job, a part-time job, and making the honor roll, it’s no wonder Diane was tired. “She stays up until 7 in the morning doing her homework,” Devin says. 

Judge Lanny Moriarty didn’t have to sentence Diane to a night in jail, but he wanted to make an example of her."If you let one of them run loose, what are you going to do with the rest of them?" Judge Moriarty told reporters. “A little stay in the jail for one night is not a death sentence.”

Samuel Oh thinks working hard to provide for your family should not be cause for criminal punishment — so Samuel started a petition on Change.org asking Judge Moriarty to revoke the charges against Diane. Click here to add your name.

"Somehow Diane is not just an extraordinary worker and student, she’s an extraordinary human being with a fighting spirit," Samuel says. "The institutions that are supposed to provide resources to youth and ensure justice are punishing her instead."

There is some good news: when a reporter recently asked Judge Moriarty if anything could be done to get him to revoke Diane’s charges, he replied, “Yeah, it probably could.”

Samuel believes that if thousands of people sign his petition, Judge Moriarty will take this opportunity to do the right thing and revoke Diane’s charges.

Click here to sign Samuel’s petition asking Judge Moriarty to revoke the charges against Diane Tran, an honors student who had to spend the night in jail for missing school.

The news clip mentioned that it is going to go on her records, which could potentially tarnish her future.  It would be great if you can take a few moments to sign this to show that this extremely hardworking girl should be getting applauded, not have criminal record stamped on her resumes for the rest of her life.

(I really want to know why her parents aren’t getting arrested and charged for neglect/child abuse of her and her siblings…)

Honor Student Supporting Siblings Arrested for being too Exhausted for School

A 17-year-old high school honor student who works two jobs and financially supports her two siblings is heading into summer on a sour note after spending a night in jail for being too tired to attend school.

Diane Tran was arrested in open court and sentenced to 24 hours in jail Wednesday after being repeatedly truant due to exhaustion. KHOU reports that Tran, a junior at Willis High School, was warned by Judge Lanny Moriarty last month to stop missing school. When she missed classes again this month, Moriarty wanted to make an example of Tran.

“If you let one (truant student) run loose, what are you gonna’ do with the rest of ‘em? Let them go too?” Moriarty asked, according to KHOU.

Tran told KHOU that in addition to taking advanced and honors classes, she works full-time and part-time jobs in an effort to try to support her older brother at Texas A&M and a younger sister in the Houston area. After Tran’s parents divorced, they both moved away from the honor student and her two siblings.

Tran was also fined $100.

Source.

If you want to support Diane, you can sign a petition here, or donate here

I saw this earlier in the week and it still boggles me mind. What the fuck? Who in the right mind believes that is a suitable punishment for someone so bright and assiduous? 

If this was the case for everyone, do you know how many times I would’ve been in jail?

Please: Diane Tran

I’m not into signing petitions… ever… but:

This is just a petition regaurding the incident of Diane Tran - student in Texas that has been charged for truancy and a fine of $100. If you have heard anything about this situation - you know she’s not your typical minor. She is a 17 year old who was abandoned by both of her parents after they divorced. She is supporting herself, as well as her siblings, since then. She’s been balancing full time and part time jobs while taking normal high school work load along with college credited courses. She barely gets any time for rest because she has to work constantly to support what’s left of her family. With the fatigue and sadness from the incident, she has taken some days off from school to rest up so she could carry on. She missed one too many and the court has pressed charges against her - not even regaurding the situation she is in.

So please sign: Petition for Diane Tran

A support group on Facebook: Help Diane Tran

Lets bring some justice and peace to this girl. Also to raise awareness of what some students (not only in texas) are going through. Best we can do right now is help one student at a time.

“If you let one (truant student) run loose, what are you gonna’ do with the rest of ‘em? Let them go too?”-Judge Moriarty

SMH. So we let celebrities like Lindsay Lohan who committed theft and Chris Brown who committed domestic assault not face any jail time for the crimes they committed. But a girl trying to better herself juggling college courses, high school courses, and 2 jobs gets jailed for truancy. Ridiculous.  Quick questions: Where in the world are her parents? Why is she supporting her grown adult brother in college while she is only 17? 

Diane Tran isn’t like most seventeen-year-old girls her age. Sure, there are many honors students taking dual credit U.S. History, dual credit English Literacy, College Algebra, Spanish Language AP. Sure there are some who work part time and full time jobs like Diane does at a dry cleaners and a wedding venue. But Diane does all of this to support herself and her two siblings.

Diane Tran’s parents divorced and abandoned her family, leaving her the responsibility of providing for them. She is a victim of numerous failures and disappointments by the adults around her. A teacher or authority figure should have reached out to her and made sure she didn’t slip through the cracks, but no one did. Somehow she’s not just an extraordinary worker and student, she’s an extraordinary human being with a fighting spirit.

The reason why we should care about her is this: The state of Texas is sentencing a young girl to a night of jail for being too emotionally and physically exhausted to go to school. The institutions that are to provide resources to youth and ensure justice are punishing her with a $100 fine and a criminal record.

Please tell Judge Lanny Moriarty, the State of Texas, and the U.S.A. to make sure that the future leaders of our nation are looked after and taken care of. Thank you.

Update to (http://paach.tumblr.com/post/23797081927/honour-student-who-works-two-jobs-to-support-her):

The 17-year-old Willis High School honor student whose 24-hour stay in jail for excessive truancy drew national attention had the charge rescinded Wednesday, records show.

Precinct 1 Justice of the Peace Lanny Moriarty, at the Montgomery County District Attorney’s request, signed an order that vacates the contempt of court conviction that sent Diane Tran to jail last week.

(Article)

Diane Tran, overachieving 17 year old, jailed and fined for truancy due to exhaustion. [Image from facebook.com/NoBullies]

"Diane Tran isn’t like most seventeen-year-old girls her age. Sure, there are many honors students taking dual credit U.S. History, dual credit English Literacy, College Algebra, and Spanish Language AP. Sure, there are some who work part time and full time jobs like Diane does at a dry cleaners and a wedding venue. 

"But, since Diane’s parents have moved away, Diane does all of this to support herself and her two siblings.

"For a student facing these challenges, a teacher or authority figure should have reached out to her and made sure she didn’t slip through the cracks. Despite her situation, she’s not just an extraordinary worker and student, she’s an extraordinary human being with a fighting spirit.

"The reason why we should care about her is this: The state of Texas is sentencing a young girl to a night of jail for being too emotionally and physically exhausted to go to school. The institutions that are to provide resources to youth and ensure justice are instead punishing her like a criminal and fining her $100.

"The Judge in Diane’s case said he was making an example of her with this severe punishment. Diane is already an example of how people her age should be acting."

The above is from the Petition: Honor Student Jailed for Missing School: Ask the judge to cancel her fine and sentencing

alright here’s a quick note about the case of the honors student going to jail for missing too many days of school.

YES it is unfair that the judge sent her to jail. However, skipping school, for any reason, even for one as desperate as hers, is still considered truancy. If the judge were to excuse her, then that will open the gate for other cases to just “excuse” the charged just because the situation was unfair. He already reduced the sentence for her, obviously feeling sympathy. The sentence may be unfair but life is unfair and we don’t get everything we want. In the long run, she’ll grow from this and be stronger than any of us. So stop bitching about the fucking judge being stupid because he’s actually thinking smart and following the rules and keeping order in this country.