devil's-postpile

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Devils Postpile, California

The Devils Postpile formation, located in extreme northeastern Madera County in eastern California, is a rare sight in the geologic world and ranks as one of the world’s finest examples of columnar basalt. Its columns tower 60 feet high and display an unusual symmetry. (Source)

Happy St Patrick’s Day! Here’s a great pic of a #rainbow at the end of Devils Postpile National Monument’s iconic Rainbow Falls. Plunging 101-feet down to the turbulent water below, the falls are aptly named for the many rainbows that appear in its mist throughout sunny summer days.  Photo by Cat Connor (www.sharetheexperience.org).

A short hike to the top of the Devil’s Postpile on Mammoth Mountain, in the Sierra Nevada’s of California, reveals the tile-like pattern shown above. Slow cooling of basalt, from the top down, is responsible for these nearly 120 degree shrinkage cracks. The top of the “posts” were scoured by glaciers during the last glaciation. Visible on the tiles faces are glacial striations, which show the direction of motion of the glacier. A water bottle was placed for scale purposes. Photo taken in July 2008. Credit: Nel Graham. (via EPOD)

Established in 1911 by presidential proclamation, Devils Postpile National Monument protects and preserves the Devils Postpile formation, the 101-foot high Rainbow Falls, and pristine mountain scenery. The formation is a rare sight in the geologic world and ranks as one of the world’s finest examples of columnar basalt. Its columns tower 60 feet high and display an unusual symmetry.

Photo: Leonel Torres (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Archaeology or geology?

Resembling a collapsed temple of days gone by, these broken basalt columns from the Devil’s Postpile National Monument (http://tinyurl.com/lznpc9o) litter the ground below the cliff formed by the frozen lava lake.

We did an earlier post on a similar theme depicting tessellated pavement at http://tinyurl.com/kgsmjj8. Any fans are welcome to submit similar photos for a post…

Loz

Image credit: Peretz Partensky.