delivery

Jealousy

Today was Curtis first Medic clinical. He went to the local hospital’s ER. They ended up sending him to Labor & Delivery to assist/watch a live birth. He has to have 5 total live births, so I guess they figured they’d get one out of the way for him.
Is it weird for me to be a bit jealous that that’s the first birth he’s seen? I mean, sure he was in the OR when the twins were born via cesarean…but it’s just not the same as witnessing a vaginal delivery. He missed James’ too cause James came at 36 weeks and Curtis was at basic training for the Army.
I’m just jealous that if we have another he’ll be like, “eh, seen this 5 times already. Whatevs” I’m sure it will be different cause it’ll be OUR kid, but I wanted to experience it together? We’ve done so many firsts already, there aren’t much left!
I’m just being dramatic I think…

Caul birth.

A caul or cowl birth (from Latin: Caput galeatum, literally, “helmeted head”) is a delivery with a piece of membrane that can cover a newborn’s head and face. The "en-caul" birth, not to be confused with the “caul” birth, occurs when the infant is born inside the entire amniotic sac. The sac balloons out at birth, with the amniotic fluid and child remaining inside the unbroken or partially broken membrane. Birth with a caul is rare, occurring in fewer than 1 in 80,000 births. The caul is harmless and is immediately removed by the physician or midwife upon delivery of the child.

There are two types of caul membranes, and there are four ways such cauls can appear. The most common caul type is a piece of the thin, translucent inner lining of the amnion which breaks away and forms tightly against the head during the birthing process. The lesser common (unknown) type of caul tissue is adhered to the face and head by attachment points and is looped behind the ears, making the removal process more complex. In extremely rare cases, the thicker caul encases the infant’s entire body, resembling a cocoon. The rarest caul type is a thick, soft membrane of unknown tissue type, which presumably forms against the infant’s head during gestation.

In medieval times the appearance of a caul on a newborn baby was seen as a sign of good luck. It was considered an omen that the child was destined for greatness. Some Early Modern European traditions linked caul birth to the ability to defend fertility and the harvest against the forces of evil, particularly witches and sorcerers. Cauls were therefore highly prized by sailors. Medieval women often sold these cauls to sailors for large sums of money; a caul was regarded as a valuable talisman. In Romanian folklore, babies born with a caul are said to become vampires upon death.

anonymous asked:

Hi! My OB wants to go over my birth plan for my hopefully natural birth. I'm having a hard time finishing it because there is just sooo much to include and I've heard it's best to keep it short and sweet while including the most important items. If you were pregnant, what would your birth plan be? I realize a birth plan can be very personal, but I thought it might give me a good idea as to what to add.

Ooooh that’s such a good question.  Let me first reiterate that with any birth plan, I put my value on a safe and calm birth.  I know that with any birth there are millions of different ways it could turn out, so by writing down my ideal I hope to guide the birth in that direction, but I will always stay open and flexible to things changing.  I’ve put a homebirth and a hospital plan below - they’re mostly the same, but some small changes.

It’s important to remember about birth plans that it is okay if the nurse is too busy to read the plan, your doula/partner should know it cold and be able to advocate for you as necessary.

Also remember that in hospitals there are a lot of policies that are presented as fact, even if you have the right to do otherwise.  For example, if you ask for food during labor the nurse might say, “Oh, you can only have ice chips now.”  You could respond by arguing about the evidence that’s based on, or you could just have some snacks packed.

You can decline medications and surgeries, but know that if you trust your provider, it’s likely that they’re necessary or at least very important. 

My Homebirth Plan:

During labor:

  • I would like to be outside as much as weather and light permit
  • I would like my partner, my doula, and my mom in attendance
  • I would like to eat and drink as I desire
  • No IV unless necessary for GBS prophylaxis
  • No vaginal exams unless necessary
  • I would like access to a tub or shower

During birth:

  • I would like to push in the tub if safe
  • If outside of the tub, I would like to push in whatever position feels good to me - not just lying on my back
  • I would like only quiet encouragement as I push - no counting, chanting, shouting, etc.  No guided pushing.
  • I would like to put my hand on the baby’s head as it crowns and to have my midwife put pressure over my hand to help avoid tears.
  • I would like my partner to help bring the baby up to my chest.

During postpartum:

  • I would like to have skin-to-skin with my baby as long as possible.
  • I would like delayed cord clamping.
  • I would like any necessary resuscitation to occur on my belly or on the bed next to me.
  • No Hep B vaccine, no erythromycin ointment.  I do accept the Vitamin K injection. Read why here.
  • I would like to be the person to identify the baby’s sex.
  • If for some reason I cannot hold the baby I would like my partner to do skin-to-skin with the baby.

My Hospital Birth Plan:

During labor:

  • I would like calm music of my choice and dim lights.
  • I would like my partner, my doula, and my mom in attendance
  • I would like to eat and drink as I desire
  • No IV unless necessary for GBS prophylaxis
  • Vaginal exams only as necessary to make a management plan.  
  • I would like access to a tub or shower
  • I would like the hallway door closed.
  • I would like to wear my own clothing.
  • I would like to be the only person who mentions pain medication.  If I don’t say it, you don’t.

During birth:

  • I would like to push in the tub if safe
  • If outside of the tub, I would like to push in whatever position feels good to me - not just lying on my back
  • I would like only quiet encouragement as I push - no counting, chanting, shouting, etc.  No guided pushing.
  • I would like to put my hand on the baby’s head as it crowns and to have my midwife put pressure over my hand to help avoid tears.
  • I would like my partner to help bring the baby up to my chest.

During postpartum:

  • I would like to have skin-to-skin with my baby as long as possible.
  • I would like delayed cord clamping.
  • I would like any necessary resuscitation to occur on my belly or on the bed next to me.
  • No Hep B vaccine, no erythromycin ointment.  I do accept the Vitamin K injection.  Read why here.
  • I would like to be the person to identify the baby’s sex.
  • If for some reason I cannot hold the baby I would like my partner to do skin-to-skin with the baby.
Baby #56: In the caul

It feels like I have been working every day of my life recently, with so little time to do anything but charting and paperwork and blogging.  Today is my first day off of orientation in the labor and delivery floor – even though I’ve been mostly doing everything myself, this is the first day that I’ve been totally, 100% by myself.  Yesterday was a long, exhausting day where nothing went my way and people I was working with gave me lip.  I almost fell asleep in a patient’s room, sitting and waiting for her to get the urge to push.  I didn’t get home until 9:45, and I had to be back here by 8:30am – I’m just exhausted.

This morning I walked in to see that I had two patients in labor, both of whom I know from her pregnancy.  I was sort of on edge to begin with, just feeling kind of anxious about being here alone and so exhausted from working for so many days in a row.  Within an hour, though, one of my patients was fully dilated and ready to push.  Her water hadn’t broken yet, so as she pushed I kept my hands away and watched the transparent balloon of the amniotic sac bulge from her vaginal opening – small pieces of vernix floating around the baby’s head, hair swirling – and waited.   For a first time mom she was amazing, putting her hands down to touch the baby’s head through the amniotic sac and pushing incredibly well.  After only pushing for 30 minutes, she gave birth to her beautiful baby in the caul – the sac complete around the baby.  I pulled it off the baby’s face and mom reached down and grabbed her baby and pulled the baby right onto her chest.  Not only did the placenta come out without a single problem, but the mom didn’t need a single stitch.

So even though I’ve been tired and crabby and sad and worried that I was in over my head, this morning was a small reminder that this can be beautiful and good and I’m here because I love it. 

vine

I AM NOT A PIZZA 😋🍕 #wyd

youtube

Drone Wars: drone-on-demand delivery services are trending

DHL, Google, UPS, Amazon, Gofor etc pp are working on drones that could someday deliver packages to customers on the same day.

Now drum-roll bizzby wants a piece of the cake too. Their pitch: “a groundbreaking consumer collect­ and­ deliver on-­demand drone service using the company’s proven realtime smartphone (mobile first) technology platform.” According to bizzby, the drones can carry 500g and fly up to 400ft and on-board cameras capture live footage, pixelating anything identifiable.

Cool tech, for sure. But - apart from limitations like legislation, flight regulations, battery power, weight and flight distance - I remain skeptical about the real benefits of drone deliveries. But maybe it’s just my aversion to sentences like “Using technology makes our lives easier” in combination with emerging technologies and startup buzz.

However, thanks a lot for the girl in the video. She seems to share my skepticism.

[Bizzby Sky]

anonymous asked:

Is there ever really any real NEED to break a person's water artificially? If it doesn't break on it's own, the baby will just be born en caul, right?

You’re right!  There’s no medical need to break the water artificially.  Sometimes it might be decided that a baby isn’t tolerating labor very well and would be better off outside the womb, so some kind of labor-speeding agent needs to be used.  In the situation where breaking the water would actually help speed labor, it might be a better decision to use that rather than a medication like Pitocin, but in a healthy birth with no issues, there’s absolutely no reason to break the bag.

Some people say that babies born “en caul,” or still in the amniotic sac, will be prophets, but I like to think that they will be midwives.  Below the cut are photos of babies being born in the caul – NSFW-ish graphic photos of birth.

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