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Underwater Eco Sculpture by Jason deCairesTaylor

Eco-sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor constructs eerie underwater sculptural installations that provide a place for marine species of fish, plants and coral to live. He uses materials that are environmentally friendly and that aid the growth of marine life under the sea. The artist is responsible for founding and creating the world’s first underwater sculpture park located off the coast of Genada, which is called Museo Subacuatico de Arte. MUSA features a collection of more than 500 of Jason deCaires Taylor’s sculptures.

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The Cancun Underwater Museum

This truly unique “musuem” is one of the largest man-made underwater attractions on Earth and is located in Quintana Roo, Mexico. The Cancun Underwater Museum has over 400 life-size sculptures designed by English artist Jason deCaires Taylor. The installation is designed to become an artificial reef. The sculptures are all made from ph neutral clay in order to promote the growth of coral reefs and marine life.

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What We’re Loving:

I am continually captivated by the underwater art of “eco-sculptor” Jason deCaires Taylor—or, rather, what happens to it. Taylor submerges his work—predominantly human figures—in the waters of the West Indies and in the Gulf of Mexico. Over time, the permanent installations come to act as artificial reefs, attracting corals, aggregating fish species, and increasing marine biomass. Most of Taylor’s figures stand with their faces upturned to the surface, their eyes closed, as they are silently and arrestingly overtaken by algae, sponges, and hydrozoans. The overall impression is one of indomitable spirit within metamorphosis: creatures coming to life. —Anna Hadfield

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Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater museum, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).

For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.

Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.

[via Hi-Fructose]

hifructose.com

On June 30, Jonathan Levine Gallery in New York will debut to solo exhibitions that imagine epic, apocalyptic visions by Jason DeCaires Taylor and Fulvio Di Piazza. Photographer, sculptor and naturalist Jason DeCaires Taylor will be exhibiting haunting photos of his underwater sculptures in “Human Nature.” His life-like, stone figures appear sullen and haunting at a first glance, like petrified bodies preserved underwater in a sci-fi disaster video game. However, Taylor’s work speaks to the beauty of the cycle of life. Some of his sculptures have come to form parts of coral reefs, coexisting harmoniously with the ecosystem.

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Opens Saturday, June 30, 6-8p:

Human Nature……….Jason DeCaires Taylor

Ashes to Ashes……..Fulvio Di Piazza

Jonathan Levine Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC

two solo exhibitions that imagine epic, apocalyptic visions. Photographer, sculptor and naturalist Jason DeCaires Taylor will be exhibiting haunting photos of his underwater sculptures in “Human Nature.” His life-like, stone figures appear sullen and haunting at a first glance, like petrified bodies preserved underwater in a sci-fi disaster video game. However, Taylor’s work speaks to the beauty of the cycle of life. Some of his sculptures have come to form parts of coral reefs, coexisting harmoniously with the ecosystem.

Fulvio Di Piazza’s show “Ashes to Ashes” features a series of paintings of a primordial Earth, where natural materials are anthropomorphized to form god-like heads. Volcanoes erupt and clouds of smoke billow to create animal and human shapes. Di Piazza’s dark, aggressive works invite us into a fantasy world that precedes civilization. - Hi•Fructose

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