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DEA Agent Was Told To Not Enforce Drug Laws In White Areas

(WeedBlog) Many activists have pointed out over the years that the war on drugs is a war on minorities. That’s why black people are almost four times as likely to be arrested for marijuana compared to white people, even though consumption rates are about the same for both races. In many parts of America that ratio is even worse. An ex-DEA agent (named Matthew Fogg) recently did an interview in which he explained that he was told to only do drug enforcement in urban areas, and to avoid suburbs. Below is an excerpt of what he had to say, per Reader Supported News:

So when I would go into the war room, where we were setting up all of our drug and gun and addiction task force determining what cities we were going to hit, I would notice that most of the time it always appeared to be urban areas.
That’s when I asked the question, well, don’t they sell drugs out in Potomac and Springfield, and places like that? Maybe you all think they don’t, but statistics show they use more drugs out in those areas than anywhere. The special agent in charge, he says ‘You know, if we go out there and start messing with those folks, they know judges, they know lawyers, they know politicians. You start locking their kids up; somebody’s going to jerk our chain.’ He said, ‘they’re going to call us on it, and before you know it, they’re going to shut us down, and there goes your overtime.‘”

Shocking story out of California shows DEA brutality at its worst

On Tuesday, the Justice Department’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) released a summary of their investigation into Daniel Chong’s harrowing arrest, where DEA agents left him without food or water for five days and ignored his pleas for help.

Unfortunately, employing moral and ethical conduct was not as important for these agents as following institutional protocol. Chong’s story is an abominable example of authoritative abuse.

Read more | Follow micdotcom

GOVERNMENT SET UP A FAKE FACEBOOK PAGE IN THIS WOMAN’S NAME»

The Justice Department is claiming, in a little-noticed court filing, that a federal agent had the right to impersonate a young woman online by creating a Facebook page in her name without her knowledge. Government lawyers also are defending the agent’s right to scour the woman’s seized cell phone and to post photographs — including racy pictures of her and even one of her young son and niece — to the phony social media account, which the agent was using to communicate with suspected criminals.

The woman, Sondra Arquiett, who then went by the name Sondra Prince, first learned her identity had been commandeered in 2010 when a friend asked about the pictures she was posting on her Facebook page. There she was, for anyone with an account to see — posing on the hood of a BMW, legs spread, or, in another, wearing only skimpy attire. She was surprised; she hadn’t even set up a Facebook page.

The account was actually set up by U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Special Agent Timothy Sinnigen.

(Source: Schneier on Security)

A Former Medellin Cartel Official Has Been A DEA Informant For 27 Years. Now He Wants Out.

For the last five years, the DEA has issued Carlos Toro a temporary immigration document that requires him to assist in active investigations. If he stops snitching, however, his immigration status will lapse. That could mean deportation to Colombia, Toro’s country of birth, where he fears he’d be assassinated by the former cartel associates he once helped put behind bars.

Get the full story here.

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is using license-plate reader technology to photograph motorists and passengers in the US as part of an official exercise to build a database on people’s lives.

According to DEA documents published on Thursday by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the agency is capturing images of occupants in the front and rear seats of vehicles in a programme that monitors Americans’ travel patterns on a wider scale than previously thought.

The disclosure follows the ACLU’s revelation last week about the potential scale of a DEA database containing the data of millions of drivers, which kindled renewed concern about government surveillance.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/feb/05/aclu-dea-documents-spy-program-millions-drivers-passengers

A COLLECTION OF DEA TASK FORCE PATCHES»

Patches aren’t unique to the DEA – there are program and mission patches associated with many federal agencies and programs. One expert estimates there are 20,000 in existence today, some of which are historic relics and others in use. The most famous may be the patches made for NASA’s shuttle missions. But in the universe of federal patches, the DEA’s stand out for their outlandishness, as well as for showing a lighter, even flamboyant side of an agency that often presents itself as straight-laced and straight-edged.

On one patch, from the DEA’s Cocaine Intelligence Unit, the Grim Reaper sits on a bomb and does cocaine. On a patch made for the DEA’s International Conference on Ecstasy and Club Drugs, he goes to a rave holding glow-sticks and a pacifier. Other patches feature dragons, unicorns, camels and bald eagles swooping down on marijuana plants, talons outstretched.

DEA Raids 2 Los Angeles Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

LOS ANGELES (HuffPost) — Agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration raided two legal medical marijuana dispensaries in Los Angeles on Thursday that, according to multiple staff members, were fully compliant with state laws.

The Department of Justice confirmed to The Huffington Post after the raid that it was executing a search warrant on The Farmacy dispensary in Los Angeles, but said the warrant was under seal and it could not comment further.

Beginning around 10:30 a.m. Thursday morning, several DEA agents raided two dispensary locations of LA-based The Farmacy dispensary, one in West Hollywood and the other in Westwood, taking money, cannabis and computers in the process. Staff members at the West Hollywood location said there were no arrests made at either shop. It remains unclear how much money and cannabis was seized during the operation.

No More Excuses on Patriot Act Surveillance Reform

This week, Human Rights Watch took two major steps to challenge the US government’s invasive and unrestrained collection of our personal data.  HRW, along with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, sued the US Drug Enforcement Agency for illegally collecting records of our international calls as part of a secret mass surveillance program that has been ongoing for two decades.  We have also joined a broad coalition urgingthe US Congress to stop bulk collection of our personal data under the USA Patriot Act.  With a key legislative deadline coming up fast, we’re calling on Congress not to reauthorize Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act as it currently exists and take up meaningful surveillance reform instead.

DEA agents had ‘sex parties’ with prostitutes hired by drug cartels

Drug Enforcement Administration agents allegedly had “sex parties” with prostitutes hired by local drug cartels overseas over a period of several years, according to a report released Thursday by the Justice Department’s watchdog.

The report did not specify the country where the parties occurred, but a law enforcement official familiar with the matter identified it as Colombia.

Seven of the 10 DEA agents alleged to have participated in the gatherings — most of which took place at an agent’s “quarters” leased by the U.S. government — admitted to having attended the parties, the report found. The agents, some of whom had top-secret security clearances, received suspensions of two to 10 days.

Former police officers in Colombia also alleged that three DEA supervisory special agents were provided with money, expensive gifts and weapons from drug cartel members, according to the report.