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Thanks to the hundreds of people who sent me their photos of the lunar eclipse! I used a lot of the photos (though not all — I’ve received a lot more since I put this together) to make this cross-country 20 fps time lapse. (It’s a big GIF so you might have to wait for it to load…)

The title card comes from Max Corneau (aka AstroDad) who camped out in Rockwall, TX and managed to get this terrific shot at totality before the clouds closed in.

Ron Pope in Abilene, TX caught a very spooky shot of the October moon rising from the mist.

I love the “moon bounce" images that Brittney Maehl sent me from Beloit, WI. She told me: “Trying to capture the Blood Moon as an amateur WITHOUT a tripod was like making the ultimate sniper shot!” Luckily she was Navy-trained, so she got some great steady shots as well that I included in the time lapse.

The last shot is from flickr user slworking2. He says, “I used the tracking mount from an old telescope to follow the moon - and this allowed for a sharply-focused exposure.”

It was wonderful to get your photos (there were so many cool ones I couldn’t highlight specifically) and to hear your stories of blood moon hunting. Thanks again!

ICYMI: Why are blood moons red, anyway?

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Forty years ago: Desegregation in Boston Public Schools

Boston, Massachusetts, has long been a crucible for social, cultural, and political change. But Boston is also a city of contradictions.

Forty years ago, a group of parents filed a formal complaint in the U.S. District Court for Massachusetts.  The case beings with this simple sentence: “This is a class action brought by black children attending the Boston public schools and their parents.”

Tallulah Morgan et al. v. James W. Hennigan et al., United States District Court Civil Action Case File No. 72-911-G—known as the Boston schools desegregation case—occupies 54 large storage boxes in the National Archives at Boston.  The case was presented over a period of two years, and on June 21, 1974, Federal Judge W. Arthur Garrity ruled that the School Committee of the City of Boston had “intentionally brought about and maintained racial segregation” in the Boston public schools.

The response to the implementation was protest, at times violent, but eventually the Boston Public Schools would change.

During the summer of 2014, a group of educators from across the country—elementary through college—spent a week at the National Archives at Boston and Chicago studying issues of civil rights.

They scanned documents like the above letter from Mrs. Sumner Bernstein. She wrote to Boston Public Schools Superintendent Leary explaining how her initial support of Boston school desegregation turned to anger and fear after her daughter’s experience at Boston English (10/22/1974, from the Records of District Courts of the United States). All of the newly digitized documents are available online by entering “Primarily Teaching 2014” in the documents search box.

They also used these newly digitized primary sources to create online teaching activities related to education equality:

You can create your own activities on this subject with the tools available on DocsTeach!

via Education Updates » Forty years ago: Desegregation in Boston Public Schools

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This Time, Humans Out-Perform Computers

Computers are terrible at mapping the brain.  Given a cross-section of a retina for example, computers have trouble distinguishing neurons from other cells and empty space.  Humans, on the other hand, can perform this task with ease.

Still, mapping the brain would be a monumental task for one human.  So MIT neuroscientist Sebastien Seung recruited more than 120,000 online gamers to help him - via a game called EyeWire.

Players help color in neurons, and a computer later compiles their data into a complex map. Already, their work is helping scientists understand how the brain sees movement.

You can hear all about it in this story from Joe Palca.

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Iceland’s citizens were given a chance to help forge a new constitution for their country through Facebook and Twitter, so it’s not surprising that they backed the resulting draft. Now it’s over to the politicians.

Here’s a quick run-down of the background to all this. Iceland’s banking system collapsed right at the start of the financial crisis, taking the country’s government with it. The new leadership decided to go the open route, not least because secretive dealings were largely to blame for the banking fiasco.

There were two technologically interesting spinoffs of this situation. One was the creation of the Modern Media Initiative (now the International Modern Media Institute), a Wikileaks-inspired free speech drive – the idea here is to turn Iceland into an haven for free speech by inviting media organizations from around the world to host their sites in Iceland’s green data centers and enjoy the country’s strong new protections for whistleblowers and the like.

The other was the constitutional crowdsourcing. Iceland’s old constitution was based on that of former master Denmark and was seen as out-of-date, so 25 citizens were brought into into a Constitutional Council to help create a new one. The council took the ideas raised online by their fellow citizens and delivered the resulting draft in July last year. It took a while to ask the voting public at large what it thought of the result, but Iceland now has its answer to that question.

http://gigaom.com/2012/10/22/icelanders-approve-their-crowdsourced-constitution/
Who would you want to see on a panel discussing women superheroes?

We’re putting together a panel for San Diego ComicCon 2014!   Right now we’re envisioning a panel focused on women superheroes and aiming for an all-women panel!    What we definitely want is a lot of intersectionality on the panel— particularly women of color and women who hold multiple intersectional identities!  Women who write novels or comics or webcomics about superheroines!  Women who study transmedia and the depiction of superheroes!  Women who provide cultural commentary on comics and media representation!

This is where we’d love your help!  What would your dream panel on this topic look like?   Who should we invite and who would you like to see?

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To my Tumblr friends, family, and supporters:

I’m pleased to announce that I’ve been selected by the XPRIZE Foundation to be a part of a community - the XPRIZE Vanguards - with the sole purpose of stimulating innovation toward solving one of humanity’s grandest challenges: education and literacy.

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Wait…WHAT IS the XPRIZE Foundation?
It’s a non-profit that incentivizes problem-solving by placing a bounty on the task itself. By designing public competitions intended to encourage technological development, the XPRIZE is working on some of the most difficult problems of our time.

WHO ARE the XPRIZE Foundation?
Among many others, notables on the XPRIZE Board of Trustees include Elon Musk, James Cameron, Larry Page, Arianna Huffington, Ratan Tata…with the founders of the organization being Robert K. Weiss and Peter Diamandis.

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Avatar Director/Producer James Cameron floats weightless in Zero G along with X PRIZE Trustees in a flight to raise funds for the X PRIZE Foundation. Left to right: Rob McEwen (Chairman, US Gold), James Cameron, Peter H. Diamandis (Chairman/CEO, X PRIZE), Elon Musk (Chairman/CEO, SpaceX), Jim Gianopulos (Chairman/CEO, Fox Filmed Entertainment). Photo credit: Steve Boxall [source]

Don’t know who some of these people are? That’s ok. Browse my archive of Peter Diamandis posts and you’ll quickly understand that the people involved are the industry leaders of tomorrow who our children and grandchildren will be revering as pioneers whom helped set a revolutionary course for human civilization, our planet, and our spacefaring future.

Governments and large corporations are just…not working out. Private companies and entrepreneurs are currently doing what the societal titans of old have had their shot at doing. It’s time for a radical shift in how we approach tomorrow, today.

HOW CAN YOU BECOME INVOLVED in the Global Learning XPRIZE (GLXP)?
Launched on September 20, the current focus is on directing everyone to the Indiegogo crowdfunding site - yes, another crowdfunding campaign - to donate and pay it forward by sharing this with others for the benefit of literally hundreds of millions of lives…especially those who haven’t yet been born.

The campaign ends on November 6. Until then, I’ll be sharing avatars, banners, headers, videos, and PDF presentations provided to me through the XPRIZE Vanguard Community so that everyone can participate however you wish.

Signal boost, and let’s do this.

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Learn more about the GLXP.

anonymous said:

sea family, do you or your followers know what going through foster care is like?

We do have lots of asks coming from dears in troubled homes, but The Sea Family is totally inexperienced on this subject. It’s something we’d like to be able to advise on for those with no other exit, but it’s not something we really can without firsthand knowledge of the problems and stresses that come as result.

Can any of Momma’s babies provide some insight what it’s like going through a foster program? Know someone who does? We’d love to get a better picture of the process! Reblog or send a reply and we’ll release a future master-post containing your stories and tips!

- Engineer Dave

These Smart Umbrellas Measure Rainfall Data For Meteorologists (And Send It Back To The Cloud) | FastCompany

A team of Dutch scientists wants to use the crowd instead, by turning umbrellas into mini weather-monitoring stations. Every time it rains, smart umbrellas would use sensors to detect falling drops, and then use Bluetooth to send a report to a smartphone app. As people walk around with umbrellas throughout a city during a storm, each app would send in data to a central system where meteorologists could use it to come up with better predictions.

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Can we really trust the crowd? Jens Krause at TEDxGhent

Crowd-sourcing, crowd-funding, is all really that great? Well, Jens Krause has made a life of studying how crowds, or swarms, make decisions, and it turns out that crowds make terrible ones sometimes, depending on the type of problems they’re facing.

Whether you’re about to launch a big crowd-sourced project at work or are simply trying to find the best place to eat tonight, Jens’s results are worth knowing. Check it out above.

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State Park Using Hashtags & Social Media to Create a Time-Lapse of Wildfire Recovery

Hashtags are nothing more than a novelty byproduct of the 21st century, right? Wrong. At least that’s the case in the minds of the scientists behind a new project that takes advantage of photography, hashtags and social media to help crowdsource a time-lapse documentation of fire damage recovery.

The initiative, known as #MorganFire02, uses signs with included brackets along the trails of Mount Diablo State Park. Said signs politely ask travelers to place their phone in the bracket, snap a photo and share the regrowth process of the land via Instagram and/or Twitter.

(Continue Reading)

HOW YOU CAN HELP FIND MISSING MALAYSIA AIRLINES FLIGHT MH370 

Satellite company DigitalGlobe started a crowdsourcing campaign on its platform Tomnod.

Anyone can sift through more than 3,200 square kilometres of satellite images and flag any signs of debris or other clues.

DigitalGlobe is asking web users to tag any clues that may help locate the missing plane. Tomnod is not making the tagged results public.

If users start tagging some regions in large numbers, DigitalGlobe plans to use a computer algorithm to detect that.

To start searching, go to:

http://www.tomnod.com/nod/challenge/malaysiaairsar2014

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What do you think - is Mary Cassatt’s handwriting as fancy as her hat? We hope you’ll evaluate this important question and admire the penmanship of many other artists while participating in our BRAND NEW TRANSCRIPTION PROJECT, The Art of Handwriting. In a first for the smithsoniantranscriptioncenter, your transcriptions will be featured in a forthcoming book on handwriting to be published in 2015 by Princeton Architectural Press. If you’ve transcribed before, this is your chance for the limelight! And if you haven’t, there’s no better time to start than today!

Mary Cassatt, 1914 / unidentified photographer. Frederick A. Sweet research material on Mary Cassatt and James A. McNeill Whistler, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Mary Cassatt letter to John Wesley Beatty, 1905 Sept. 5. Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art records, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Transcribe this letter here!

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This is my Ada-cat! She is a six-year old black-and-white, a foundling in Brooklyn adopted off the street as an infant, and as you can see, she’s got fats, she’s got wits, she’s got boom personality. She also, horrifically, has cancer and so this:

http://www.gofundme.com/7zgfhk

is the GoFundMe page about that.

If you can, please signal-boost! We thank you so much from the bottom of our chinny-chin-chins :D

Join us on Thursday, April 3,  from 9:30 to 4 pm at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC for an all-day Archives Fair! Enter through the Special Events Entrance on 7th St. and Constitution Ave. The DC Caucus of MARAC and the National Archives Assembly are co-hosting this all-day Archives Fair. Archives-related groups and will be using the area outside the McGowan Theater as an exhibit hall.

You can watch our panel discussion online.

8:30-9:30 a.m. Coffee Hour and Exhibit Hall

9:30-10 a.m. Welcome and  Introduction by the Archivist of the United States

10:00-11:30  a.m. Panel Discussion: Crowdsourcing for Enhanced Archival Access

  • Elissa Frankle, moderator (US Holocaust Memorial Museum)
  • Helena Zinkham (Library of Congress)
  • Ching-Hsien Wang (Smithsonian)
  • Meredith Stewart (National Archives)

11:30-1 p.m. Lunch & Exhibit Hall

1-2:30 p.m. Panel Discussion: Monuments Men Archives

  • Barbara Aikens (Smithsonian)
  • Dr. Greg Bradsher (National Archives)
  • Maygene Daniels (National Gallery of Art Archives)

2:30-2:45  p.m.  Break and Exhibit Hall

2:45-3:15 p.m. National Archival Authorities Cooperative (NAAC)

  • John Martinez (National Archives)
  • Jerry Simmons (National Archives)

3:15-3:45 p.m. Donations Partnership Database

  • Dawn Sherman (National Archives)
  • Meg Ryan (National Archives)

3:45-4 p.m.   Closing Remarks and Exhibit Hall

Earlier this year i was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. After losing my job and medical bills stacking up I’m deep under water. Luckily my insurance is going to continue covering me till the end of July but i am living with no income for about another 4 weeks. My bills are coming due and i’m afraid of losing my car which would force me to leave my new job. I just need a little help getting settled into my new life. I’m currently moving from couch to couch or living out of my car. 

Please, anything you can give will help.

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