creoleness

The Creole Affair is the story of the most successful slave rebellion in American history, and the effects of that rebellion on diplomacy, the domestic slave trade, and the definition of slavery itself. Held against their will aboard the Creole—a slave ship on its way from Richmond to New Orleans in 1841—the rebels seized control of the ship and changed course to the Bahamas. Because the Bahamas were subject to British rule of law, the slaves were eventually set free, and these American slaves’ presence on foreign soil sparked one of America’s most contentious diplomatic battles with the UK, the nation in control of those remote islands.

Though the rebellion appeared a success, the ensuing political battle between the United States and Britain that would lead the rivals to the brink of their third war, was just beginning. As such, The Creole Affair is just as importantly a story of diplomacy: of two extraordinary non-professional diplomats who cleverly resolved the tensions arising from this historic slave uprising that, had they been allowed to escalate, had the potential for catastrophe.

HOOOOOOOOOOO SMALL KINE SUHPRISED BY DIS USE OF PIDGIN IN A JAPANEEE MANGA. I wonder how hard it was to write that. I DO NOT KNOW IF I AM SEEING THINGS WHAT IS LYF HOLY CRAP. The title says “The kind five stay in the stores”? And the chapter title is called “Broke da mout” which translates into something really delicious You want to eat it all). HAHAHAHAHA FOR ALL THE NON-HAWAII PIDGIN SPEAKERS, I REALLY GOTTA WONDER WHAT THEY THOUGHT THEY WERE READING I AM DYING THIS IS SO GREAT YOU DON’T EVEN KNOW!! CHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEHUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU

Am I seeing things or was this really written in Pidgin?

Oh my god. The whole chapter is in Pidgin. This is so beautiful that I feel like I’m going to cry.

RP WITH BLOODREDDRACULINA

Another day, another contract with another vampire hiding in plain sight. Jamaar would kill for something more interesting. This time he was in England, just outside of London (maybe he could visit his friend after the contract). He was told that the vampire was in a town called Aylesbury, approximately 60 kilometers North West of London.  As always it was his job to identify the target, verify if it is a vampire and if it is kill it. He had left out with his boken on his back ready to earn his pay. But there was a problem.

“BLOODCLAAT!”. He cursed in Jamaica creole while looking at his phone  He had forgotten to charge it and the battery had just died. “Fuck” He was using the GPS to find his way to Aylesbury. A dead battery meant that he was lost.

He considered his options. He could take a train, but he was not fond of public transport. He could try and fly but it was the middle of the night and a bird eyes view was less useful in the dark  Maybe he could ask for directions, but it would be a long shot to find someone out at this time. Fortune seemed to favor him, however, as ahead of him he saw someone. A blond female wearing a khaki coloured uniform.

Jamaar ran up, attempted to get her attention by speaking in his baritone voice. “Pardon me miss could you help me? I have suddenly found myself without a map and in need of directions” he said while gesturing to his dead phone.

6

"My mom owned a hair salon for 25 years, and I have seen every texture, every color, every length, and I was always taught from a young age that good hair is healthy hair. 

[As black women], we are so hard on ourselves. After people saw my hair for the first time [shaved after wearing it below the shoulder], I got all the backlash. There were a lot of jokes; people who just flat out say, “You’re ugly without your hair.” On Twitter, it was the No. 3 trending topic. I was like, These are my people and this is what is important to them? I have family that still has those attitudes [of light skin and long hair being automatically better than dark skin and short hair].

I think that when I was younger, I may have tried extra hard to be like, Let me get dirty. I think my mother, whether she would admit it or not, overcompensated in ways to do the same, because she felt like people would think she was too bougie. She even told me when she was younger she went through this Angela Davis phase where she would put sand in her hair. Clorox in her hair to make it coarser because she always felt like people were judging her to be that typical lighter-complexioned, fine hair, green-eyed woman. 

We had so  much resentment growing up. My mom, who is [Louisiana] Creole, was so protective against family influences. She was scared for us, because many of my cousins still are doing brown paper bag tests [meaning if you’re lighter than a paper bag you’re okay and if you’re darker are not], maybe not literally…

After I had my son, and I was married, I wanted to be the typical pretty, long-haired trophy wife. That’s when I started wearing weaves—long and blonde. I would cook three meals a day, be with my baby, clean the house, and bring cookie’s to my ex-husband’s football team. But as soon as we broke up, I was like, This shit is gone! [Laughter] This doesn’t even look right with my skin tone. Since then I’ve done whatever the hell I wanted.

Can we talk about how many people have given me these kind hugs when I had a weave?…

When I cut my hair off, I felt liberated. I felt like the time, energy, and money that I was putting into maintaining everyday could go to maintaining myself, my emotional and my mental growth.”

Solange, excerpts from her interview in “The Root of The Issue(Essence magazine, 2009)

The depth of isolation in the ghetto is also evident in black speech patterns, which have evolved steadily away from Standard American English. Because of their intense social isolation, many ghetto residents have come to speak a language that is increasingly remote from that spoken by American whites. Black street speech, or more formally, Black English Vernacular, has its roots in the West Indian creole and Scots-Irish dialects of the eighteenth century. As linguists have shown, it is by no means a “degenerate,” or “illogical” version of Standard American English; rather, it constitutes a complex, rich, and expressive language in its own right, with a consistent grammar, pronunciation, and lexicon all its own.
— 

Douglas Massey and Nancy A. Denton, Chapter 6: “The Perpetuation of the Underclass,” p. 162 (American apartheid: segregation and the making of the underclass)

As linguists have shown, it is by no means a “degenerate,” or “illogical” version of Standard American English; rather, it constitutes a complex, rich, and expressive language in its own right, with a consistent grammar, pronunciation, and lexicon all its own.