court-physician

2

Gwen knocking the crap out of Merlin’s poor gorgeous head with a water basin. Nice catch in the second gif, Gaius.

I painted this whole thing, believe it or not because of the arc on the upper left. Since the first time I laid eyes on the design I fell in love with its beauty and the rest of the painting was just suppose to provide an atmosphere befitting of the arc. 

I also tried a new method of painting digitally on this one (thats where the funny colors come from), changed the color space from RGB to Lab for coloring from the greyscale of the piece. Still not quite used to the way Lab behaves in photoshop (or anywhere else as the matter of the fact), but I have realized that there might be some ways to actually get a decent coloring out of a gray scale without painting the whole thing over so I am going to keep trying to see if I would get anything.

At any case, the place is Isfahan, it was the capital of different persian dynasties and at its height was a center of knowledge and debates, still lots of the buildings are left and the arcitecture is turely awe inspiring. In anycase I added so much detail to this thing that I dont think any one would notice. 

You can follow me on:

 

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Contact: sh.shahrabi@hotmail.com

6

Movie: Restoration (1995)

Starring: Robert Downey Jr, Sam Neil, Meg Ryan, Ian McKellen, Hugh Grant, David Thewlis

Synopsis: In the 1660s, Robert Merival is a doctor who prefers getting drunk with whores to practicing medicine.  When he saves the life of the king’s favorite dog, the king hires him as Court Physician. This position entails Robert drinking and acting like a fool while living in the palace. Then the kings asks him a favor: he is to marry the king’s mistress Celia Clemance. The king’s other mistress is jealous of Celia, so the king hopes to throw her suspicions off my marrying Celia to Robert. Robert is given a house and a knighthood. He is only given one instruction: hands off Celia. So of course Robert promptly falls for he, tries to make a move and is rejected. 

Stripped of his new title and his new home, as punishment for disobeying the king, Robert looks to his friend from medical school for help. He is given a position working at a hospital Quaker sanitarium. Here, he meets Katherine. Katherine is a patient who was declared mad after her daughter died and her husband abandoned her. But Robert suspects that Katherine isn’t as mad as she seems. As he gets to know Katherine, Robert begins to wonder if it’s possible that he can help her.  As he tries she begins to help him as well, and Robert discovers that he has more to offer the world than simply being drunk who is amusing at parties. 

My Thoughts: This film takes place during the reign of King Charles II of England. Charles’ father was executed during the height of the English Civil War and Charles was exiled for a decade while England was rules by Oliver Cromwell. Following Cromwell’s death, Charles II came back to England and reclaimed his throne, thereby restoring the monarchy (more on all that here). 

Restoration is a big theme in this movie in general. Most literally the tile refers to the historical period. But it also follows Robert Merival’s loss of self and restoration. When we first meet Robert he is a hard partying, drunken womanizer. His fine mind and medical skill are wasted. He is gradually restored to these gifts as he experiences rejection, failure, friendship and love. Likewise, Katherine is lost when we first meet her: she has lost her family and her ability to function. Robert’s love helps restore her courage and wits and she in terms helps restore him his gifts. There are other restorations throughout the film as well. 

Trailerhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqEUgjPQ_Ys

8

"To this the Queene in charitable manner replying in few wordes, ended that talk, having also by Gods only blessing, happely for that tyme and ever, escaped the dangerous snares of her bloudy and cruell enemies."
-John Foxe

David Starkey has, in contrast, pointed out a crucial piece of evidence supporting Foxe’s acocunting. He observes that on 24 October 1546, Thomas Wendy was granted a valuable manor and recotry for his services as the queen’s physician. Starkey plausibly suggests that this was a reward to Wendy for his aid to Katherine during her time of crisis with Henry. What is more significant, however, is that Foxe knew the names of the court physicians, and of Katherine’s ladies, a quarter of a century later. This detail suggests that the story was not Foxe’s invention. Conversely, so do the points of the story that Foxe states that he does not know, such as his uncertainty as to whether Henry disclosed the queen’s arrest to Wendy or to Owen or his ignorance of what Wriothesley said to Henry in the garden at Whitehall.  (The former is something that one of Katherine’s ladies would not know at first hand and Foxe explicitly states that what Wriothesley said to Henry was out of earshot to Katherine and her ladies.) If Foxe had invented the story, why didn’t he fabricate the details?  - Thomas Freeman, from One Survived: The Account of Katherine Parr in Foxe’s “Book of Martyrs” 

Hey guys, it’s me here, your resident… Court physician? I haven’t seen the episode, but I was wondering if someone would talk to me about it, or anything really. I’m kind of in a bad place right now. And you guys and Agent Carter always make me feel better. That’s partly why I love this show so much. 

P.S. There’s still hope for Cartson!

Rantings from the Bully Pulpit

Rantings from the Bully Pulpit

February 7, 2015 7:45 PM

Comment:  It looks like it is too late already.  The ABAM is closer than ever to becoming a member of the ABMS, there is a big push from the Obama administration to fund addiction treatment and to greatly widen access.  As communities see how well run addiction programs save lives and force crime away from their homes the trend will be very hard to stop.  I agree,…

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First Nighter: Mark Rylance in "Farinelli and the King," John Hollingworth's "Multitudes," Zinie Harris's "How to Hold Your Breath"

London—Since William Congreve wrote that “music hath charm to soothe a savage breast,” people have assumed he was right. The composer Claire van Kampen has decided to demonstrate its truth by imagining Farinelli and the King—at the Sam Wanamaker, though not for long—and having spouse Mark Rylance take the right hand side of the title roles.

Rylance is Philippe V, who’s discovered in bed fishing over a goldfish bowl while his country, and more immediately his wife Isabella Farnese (Melody Grove) and chief minister De la Cuadra (Edward Peel) await hoped-for flashes of lucidity.

Mental health restoration only comes when Doctor Jose Cervi (Huss Garbiya), the court physician, brings famous castrato Farinelli (Sam Crane) to sing. The ruse works. Claiming that on listening to Farinelli, he now realizes there is a heaven, Philippe regains his senses and, a threat to depose him quelled, takes charge of his duties again.

The catch is that he insists Farinelli sing for him at the drop of a crown—24/7. Though Farinelli is at first reluctant to abandon his thriving career, he eventually does, cutting himself off from devoted associate Metastasio (Colin Hurley).

Part of the staying-on allure is Isabella’s romantic interest in him and, though he fights it, his for her. Much of that anguish is played out after Philippe, slipping in and out of rational behavior, has decided they all must live in the forest to commune with the musical stars.

Although Crane speaks Farinelli’s dialogue, one of two countertenors does the singing, always in duplicate costumes. They’re either Iestyn Davies, whom I heard, or William Purefoy, and the celestial effect they have is in very large part responsible for the overall spell van Kampen and the always astonishing Rylance cast.

Rylance, almost needless to say of the frequent award winner, can be touching when he wants and just as often seemingly off-the-cuff funny. His great gift is his ability to switch at an instant between strength and vulnerability. While his entire performance is a high point, he’s especially appealing during a sequence when he gleefully observes a crowd gathered in the forest by Doctor Cervi as they, too, cheer Farinelli and his bringing them that new-fangled thing: opera.

Taking place on the small, candle-lit Wanamaker stage as well as in its short center aisle, Farinelli and the King, as directed by John Dove, is a bibelot of a piece, as delightful and shiny as a charm on a royal bracelet. Offered in the intimate Jacobean setting (seating capacity: 340), the play is like a music box within a music box. It’s really about an undoubted concern of van Kampen’s as a composer: Can art heal? She makes a strong argument that it definitely can, at least some of the time.
****************************************
Islamophobia is showing up in worldwide headlines, and, in particular, is receiving a close and unsettling consideration at the always politically engaged Tricycle. The bad news is blared in John Hollingworth’s Multitudes.

The playwright is concerned with the unlikelihood of the threatening development to diminish any time soon. Though seemingly bland at first view, his title suggests that a lessening of the global situation isn’t about to happen when so many opinions and positions proliferate. He’s saying that those promoting Islam either peacefully or violently and those opposed to it are so varied that agreement among the multiple factions is chimeric.

He focuses his two-act work on Natalie (Clare Calbraith), who’s just converted to Islam as a result of a volatile affair with Kash (Navin Chowdhry), a moderate engaged in perpetuating his convictions. His daughter Qadira (Salma Hoque), however, takes a radical stance. At the same time, Natalie’s mother, Lyn (Jacqueline King) is willing to go along with Natalie’s conversion but retains strong feelings about Muslim presence in the England she’s known and now sees irreversibly changing around her.

Tricycle artistic director Indhu Rubasingham directs the drama by orchestrating well the constantly explosive emotions. The heated events come to a boil in Bradford, England as a Conservative Party conference is on its way. Much of the strife among the four principals occurs in regard to a speech Kash is preparing to give calling for moderation. As he’s seen in silhouette delivering it, Qadira in the foreground has a protest in mind the result of which further affects all their lives.

Rubasingham and her actors leave little opportunity for missing first-time dramatist Hollingworth’s dire point. If he’s right about it—and, sad to say, there’s little substantiation for a counter argument—the future of clashing religious outlooks is grim.
**********************************
Somewhere near the end of Zinie Harris’s How to Hold Your Breath, at the Royal Court, a character called the Librarian (Peter Forbes) looks at in extremis protagonist Dana (Maxine Peake) and says, “Let’s face it, she saw the dark swamp at the bottom of the human soul.”

Though the line is meant to devastate with its acknowledgement of how dreadful life really is, most spectators could feel the urge to laugh. They may fight the urge, but few would deny it.

There are playwrights—Harris is one of them—who think they’re plumbing the, uh, dark swamp at the bottom of the human soul but who are actually doing no such thing. They’re merely attempting to be taken as serious artists by vociferously promoting a pessimistic view of the human condition. The problem is they’re proclaiming nihilism without earning the right.

Poor Dana begins by having Jarron (Michael Shaeffer), the man with whom she just had sex (and possibly the Devil?), offer to pay her because he assumed that when he picked her up, she was a prostitute. It’s humiliating, but what follows makes that figurative slap seem like a big smooch. Later, when Dana is at the pinnacle of a ramp down which a contingent of supernumeraries are slip-sliding, she’s truly gotten herself in trouble.

No need to go on about Harris’s script, which Royal Court artistic director Wendy Featherstone helmed, other than to say it’s not worth anyone’s time, least of all Harris’s or Featherstone’s.

First Nighter: Mark Rylance in "Farinelli and the King," John Hollingworth's "Multitudes," Zinie Harris's "How to Hold Your Breath"

London—Since William Congreve wrote that “music hath charm to soothe a savage breast,” people have assumed he was right. The composer Claire van Kampen has decided to demonstrate its truth by imagining Farinelli and the King—at the Sam Wanamaker, though not for long—and having spouse Mark Rylance take the right hand side of the title roles.

Rylance is Philippe V, who’s discovered in bed fishing over a goldfish bowl while his country, and more immediately his wife Isabella Farnese (Melody Grove) and chief minister De la Cuadra (Edward Peel) await hoped-for flashes of lucidity.

Mental health restoration only comes when Doctor Jose Cervi (Huss Garbiya), the court physician, brings famous castrato Farinelli (Sam Crane) to sing. The ruse works. Claiming that on listening to Farinelli, he now realizes there is a heaven, Philippe regains his senses and, a threat to depose him quelled, takes charge of his duties again.

The catch is that he insists Farinelli sing for him at the drop of a crown—24/7. Though Farinelli is at first reluctant to abandon his thriving career, he eventually does, cutting himself off from devoted associate Metastasio (Colin Hurley).

Part of the staying-on allure is Isabella’s romantic interest in him and, though he fights it, his for her. Much of that anguish is played out after Philippe, slipping in and out of rational behavior, has decided they all must live in the forest to commune with the musical stars.

Although Crane speaks Farinelli’s dialogue, one of two countertenors does the singing, always in duplicate costumes. They’re either Iestyn Davies, whom I heard, or William Purefoy, and the celestial effect they have is in very large part responsible for the overall spell van Kampen and the always astonishing Rylance cast.

Rylance, almost needless to say of the frequent award winner, can be touching when he wants and just as often seemingly off-the-cuff funny. His great gift is his ability to switch at an instant between strength and vulnerability. While his entire performance is a high point, he’s especially appealing during a sequence when he gleefully observes a crowd gathered in the forest by Doctor Cervi as they, too, cheer Farinelli and his bringing them that new-fangled thing: opera.

Taking place on the small, candle-lit Wanamaker stage as well as in its short center aisle, Farinelli and the King, as directed by John Dove, is a bibelot of a piece, as delightful and shiny as a charm on a royal bracelet. Offered in the intimate Jacobean setting (seating capacity: 340), the play is like a music box within a music box. It’s really about an undoubted concern of van Kampen’s as a composer: Can art heal? She makes a strong argument that it definitely can, at least some of the time.
****************************************
Islamophobia is showing up in worldwide headlines, and, in particular, is receiving a close and unsettling consideration at the always politically engaged Tricycle. The bad news is blared in John Hollingworth’s Multitudes.

The playwright is concerned with the unlikelihood of the threatening development to diminish any time soon. Though seemingly bland at first view, his title suggests that a lessening of the global situation isn’t about to happen when so many opinions and positions proliferate. He’s saying that those promoting Islam either peacefully or violently and those opposed to it are so varied that agreement among the multiple factions is chimeric.

He focuses his two-act work on Natalie (Clare Calbraith), who’s just converted to Islam as a result of a volatile affair with Kash (Navin Chowdhry), a moderate engaged in perpetuating his convictions. His daughter Qadira (Salma Hoque), however, takes a radical stance. At the same time, Natalie’s mother, Lyn (Jacqueline King) is willing to go along with Natalie’s conversion but retains strong feelings about Muslim presence in the England she’s known and now sees irreversibly changing around her.

Tricycle artistic director Indhu Rubasingham directs the drama by orchestrating well the constantly explosive emotions. The heated events come to a boil in Bradford, England as a Conservative Party conference is on its way. Much of the strife among the four principals occurs in regard to a speech Kash is preparing to give calling for moderation. As he’s seen in silhouette delivering it, Qadira in the foreground has a protest in mind the result of which further affects all their lives.

Rubasingham and her actors leave little opportunity for missing first-time dramatist Hollingworth’s dire point. If he’s right about it—and, sad to say, there’s little substantiation for a counter argument—the future of clashing religious outlooks is grim.
**********************************
Somewhere near the end of Zinie Harris’s How to Hold Your Breath, at the Royal Court, a character called the Librarian (Peter Forbes) looks at in extremis protagonist Dana (Maxine Peake) and says, “Let’s face it, she saw the dark swamp at the bottom of the human soul.”

Though the line is meant to devastate with its acknowledgement of how dreadful life really is, most spectators could feel the urge to laugh. They may fight the urge, but few would deny it.

There are playwrights—Harris is one of them—who think they’re plumbing the, uh, dark swamp at the bottom of the human soul but who are actually doing no such thing. They’re merely attempting to be taken as serious artists by vociferously promoting a pessimistic view of the human condition. The problem is they’re proclaiming nihilism without earning the right.

Poor Dana begins by having Jarron (Michael Shaeffer), the man with whom she just had sex (and possibly the Devil?), offer to pay her because he assumed that when he picked her up, she was a prostitute. It’s humiliating, but what follows makes that figurative slap seem like a big smooch. Later, when Dana is at the pinnacle of a ramp down which a contingent of supernumeraries are slip-sliding, she’s truly gotten herself in trouble.

No need to go on about Harris’s script, which Royal Court artistic director Wendy Featherstone helmed, other than to say it’s not worth anyone’s time, least of all Harris’s or Featherstone’s.

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asundrop asked:

(Has Catherine ever regretted a decision she's made? Whether it's about her children, her reign, or growing up how she did?)

//She has a lot of remorse in regard to decisions she’s made, but wouldn’t go back and make different choices if she could. The only things she regrets, as in she would go back and change, are foisting Clarissa off on the court physician after she was born and shutting Henry out to the extent that she did. 

Fangirl challenge

Tv Shows 2/10

Classic tale of Author but from Young Merlin’s point of view

Premise:

Merlin is a young warlock who arrives in the kingdom of Camelot after his mother arranges for him to stay with the court physician, Gaius. He discovers that the king, Uther Pendragon, has outlawed magic and imprisoned the last Dragon deep under the kingdom. After hearing a mysterious voice inside his head, Merlin makes his way to the cavern beneath Camelot where the Great Dragon tells Merlin that he has an important destiny: to protect Uther’s son, Arthur, who will return magic to Camelot and unite the land of Albion.

When Merlin meets Arthur, he believes that he is an arrogant bully and Arthur, likewise, has a less than stellar opinion of Merlin. After saving the prince’s life Merlin becomes his servant and the two begin to respect and trust one another. Merlin eventually becomes close friends with Arthur, and another servant named Guinevere. But when Uther’s actions eventually cause his ward Morgana turn against Camelot, Merlin must work together with the Once and Future King (Arthur) to save the kingdom of Albion.

28 February 1594 Trial of Rodrigo Lopez finds him guilty of plot to poison Queen Elizabeth I #otdimjh

28 February 1594 Trial of Rodrigo Lopez finds him guilty of plot to assassinate Queen Elizabeth I #otdimjh

The Jewish Encyclopedia gives the following account:

Court physician to Queen Elizabeth; born in Portugal about 1525; executed June 7, 1594, for having attempted to poison the queen. He settled in London in 1559, and in 1571 was residing in the parish of St. Peter le Poer. Previous to this he had become a member of the College of Physicians, and was selected in the lastmentioned year to read the…

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The three emails below were received within 24 hours from a physician supporting (and in all likelihood involved in) drug courts and physician health programs (PHPs). Emails such as this are invariably anonymous and I usually drag them right to the trash where they belong but the trio below provides valuable insight into the mentality of those involved. And for that reason I am posting them as they were received.