contraceptive

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'I Think She Was A She' Proudly Proclaims There's No Shame In Having An Abortion

In the slam poem “I Think She Was A She,” spoken word poet and performance artist Leyla Josephine recounts the abortion she had as a teenager and the cultural shame she’s been constantly confronted with ever since.

Be brought to tears when you watch Leyla recite the full moving poem here. 

The male pill? Bring it on

Don’t tell me men couldn’t be trusted to take contraceptive pills – I did two trials, and it was frankly brilliant

The male contraceptive pill is in the news again, and, having done two years’ of clinical trials, I hope this time it will really happen. It is for commercial and social reasons that the male pill is not yet available, not scientific ones – the drug companies think men won’t be interested, and they think women won’t trust men who say: “Don’t worry, darling, I’m on the pill.” But my experience, albeit more than a decade ago, was largely positive, and those attitudes are seriously outdated. The first time I took part, I was off with my then-partner to the family planning clinic, when she said: “It’s so unfair that there isn’t a pill you could take instead of me. Would you, if you could?” There’s really only one answer to that question. When we got to the clinic there was a cheesy poster on the wall showing Neil Armstrong on the moon, captioned “Be the first man on the pill!” And so the deal was done. (via The male pill? Bring it on | James Mackenzie | Comment is free | theguardian.com)

800,000 women in the U.K. use a birth control called Implanon. It’s a match stick-sized device that is placed under the skin in a fat layer of the upper arm. It’s designed to release hormones that stop ovulation, preventing conception for up to five years. It’s a fairly simple procedure, and the implant can be taken out at any time. But it must be put in, and taken out, by a doctor. 

But hundreds of British women who were using an implant nevertheless wound up pregnant last year and — after visiting doctors to have the implants removed — discovered that the implants were nowhere to be found. 

The birth control that’s getting lost in women’s bodies