My School Encourages Racism

I go to James F. Byrnes High School in Duncan, South Carolina. The name of our mascot is the Rebels. White kids walk around wearing the Confederate Flag in “honor” of the sports teams. Fridays are really scary for me because all these kids are wearing these offensive t-shirts but the teachers say it’s okay because WE are the Rebels.

Now my school is asking people to vote YES on a bond campaign. I want everyone to vote NO unless they change the mascot. No one will listen to me. I’m asking the internet to make this go viral. I shouldn’t have to put up with racism in my school like this at all. They shouldn’t get more money to make it worse!

Here is a link to info on the bond:
http://www.wspa.com/story/26228421/byrnes-high-school-renovation-supporters-ask

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Confederate Receipt Book: A Compilation of Over One Hundred Receipts, Adapted to the Times, published by “A Confederate Lady” in Richmond in 1863, offered recipes to help Southern women cope with the chronic shortages of everyday foods.

Some recipes from the “Confederate Lady”

SUBSTITUTE FOR COFFEE.—

Take sound ripe acorns, wash them while in the shell, dry them, and parch until they open, take the shell off, roast with a little bacon fat, and you will have a splendid cup of coffee.

SPRUCE BEER.—

Take three gallons of water, blood warmth, three half pints of molasses, a tablespoonful of essence of spruce, and the like quantity of ginger, mix well together with a gill of yeast, let it stand over night, and bottle it in the morning. It will be in a good condition to drink in twenty-four hours.

APPLE PIE WITHOUT APPLES.—

To one small bowl of crackers, that have been soaked until no hard parts remain, add one teaspoonful of tartaric acid, sweeten to your taste, add some butter, and a very little nutmeg.

SODA BISCUIT.—

One quart of sour milk, one teaspoonful of soda, one of salt, a piece of butter the size of an egg, and flour enough to make them roll out.

http://docsouth.unc.edu/imls/receipt/receipt.html

My School Has a Racist Mascot

I go to James F. Byrnes High School in Duncan, South Carolina. The name of our mascot is the Rebels. White kids walk around wearing the Confederate Flag in “honor” of the sports teams. Fridays are really scary for me because all these kids are wearing these offensive t-shirts but the teachers say it’s okay because WE are the Rebels.

Now my school is asking people to vote YES on a bond campaign. I want everyone to vote NO unless they change the mascot. No one will listen to me. I’m asking the internet to make this go viral. I shouldn’t have to put up with racism in my school like this at all. They shouldn’t get more money to make it worse!

Here is a link to info on the bond:
http://www.wspa.com/story/26228421/byrnes-high-school-renovation-supporters-ask

A Manual of Military Surgery, Confederate States of America, Surgeon General’s Office, 1863-National Library of Medicine

 25,000 Southerners returned from the Civil War permanently disfigured from the amputation of a limb. There are relatively few historical works that address the meaning of amputation following the Civil War. When veterans returned home from the war, they faced a new set of challenges, especially for those who returned home physically and emotionally scarred. Chiefly, although the war became a venue wherein Confederate men could find new definitions of individual and societal worth based on their performance in battle, it also produced new challenges to the older definitions.

It is reasonable to assume that Southerners would view the actions of their soldiers as honorable. Circumstances required that Southern men and women incorporated the imperfect Southern male body within their traditional notions of manhood. They did so by blending traditional gender models with their celebrations of veterans’ sacrifices in remembering the Civil War as an honorable defeat.

http://www.factasy.com/civil_war/blogs/jhtaylor/confederate_amputees_and_women_who_loved_or_tried_love_them

 

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July 3 marks the 150th anniversary of Pickett’s Charge, the defining event of the battle of Gettysburg.

In the background to the left, you can see the Copse of Trees, where the Union forces held their ground against the oncoming Confederate troops. The Union victory at Gettysburg is thought to be the turning point of the Civil War.

You can read the full story on the Prologue blog.

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