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Gray Fullbuster’s Ice Mage Conditioning / Tough Like The Toonz: EP 4

DON’T CALL IT A COMEBACK!!! Want to be a ripped sexy muhfugga with a High tolerance for cold well today’s episode will get ya nice and lean like Gray Fullbuster from the popular anime/manga Fairy Tail and have a ton of Juvia wannabes swooning over ya haha. Ice Baths hurt like a bitch but get ya covered in em 

As always Reblogs are Greatly appreciated!

Understand that as you are growing up, anytime at all, anything that is contradictory to the unconditional love that you know you are made of is presented to you, anytime you are forced by situations to limit yourself, to cut yourself off from that unlimited being that you are, anytime you are in anyway shape or form coerced into not being allowed to express the totality of your being, anytime that this occurs, you then choose to diminish your awareness of yourself just a little bit more. Just a little bit more, just a little bit more – fit into this mold, that mold, do it this way, this is the way it’s done, you must fit, you must fit, you must fit – you don’t want to be thought of as strange or unusual, you don’t want to be looked at as crazy and locked up. You must fit, you must belong – you must be one of us.

Alright, I’ll diminish myself a little bit more, and a little bit more, and a little bit more, because I want you to love me. I am missing the love, where is the love? Is this the way to get it? To accept what you are saying, to buy into your belief? If I believe as you do, if I limit myself, will you love me? Alright, I’ll limit myself.

But then after you are so good at doing that – thinking that you are doing it because that’s the way you are going to get the love that somehow isn’t there, that somehow isn’t unconditional, all of a sudden you begin to realize you’ve been doing it long enough that now you don’t know any other way to attract love, other than to continue to limit yourself. And so this is the process you are now going through, to break that chain of limitation, of self limitation, so that you can understand that you deserve unconditional love anyway, no matter what, just because you exist. There are no specific parameters that must exist to define you, to say that you must be this way in order to deserve the unconditional love that comes from All That Is.

—  Bashar

J. B Watson/The Little Albert Experiment.

The little Albert experiment was tried and tested by experimental psychologist J.B Watson in an attempt to document evidence of classical conditioning among humans. 

Watson believed he could train a child to be negatively responsive to certain things such as loud noises through conditioning, he tested this theory on Little Albert, who was only 9 months old at the time. One of Watson’s more memorable attempts was creating a loud bang to scare the child before placing a rabbit in front of him, therefore conditioning Albert to associate the rabbit with something that made him fearful. Through this theory, Watson proved fear can be learnt.

Despite this experiment proving as one of the most immoral and scrutinised in psychological history, it has time and time again proven as a benchmark for psychological studies.

Not to know one’s true identity is to be a mad, disensouled thing — a golem. And, indeed, this image, sick-eningly Orwellian, applies to the mass of human beings now living in the high-tech industrial democracies. Their authenticity lies in their ability to obey and follow mass style changes that are conveyed through the media. Immersed in junk food, trash media, and cryp-tofascist politics, they are condemned to toxic lives of low awareness. Sedated by the prescripted daily television fix, they are a living dead, lost to all but the act of consuming.
—  Terence McKenna

[image source]

A New Kind of Dinner Bell

Let’s face it: wildlife researchers have it tough. Imagine it was your job, day in and day out, to locate a solitary wolf in an area of 50 square miles. It would be like trying to find a needle in a haystack, right? Well, now imagine it was your job to locate a solitary fish in the entire ocean. How does tracking the wolf sound now?

Luckily, scientists have come up with many different methods to track animals more easily, usually referred to as telemetry. For example, a wolf researcher may be able to fit an individual wolf with a radio collar. The signal emitted by the collar can be picked up by a transceiver and lets the researcher know where the wolf is and track its location over time.

The same can be done for fish, though a little differently. Radio waves don’t travel well through salt water, so researchers use a technique referred to as acoustic tagging. Rather than attaching a radio transmitter to a fish or small invertebrate in order for it to be tracked and populations monitored, researchers attach a small tag which lets out small, ultrasonic pinging noises that can be easily picked up and tracked by scientific equipment. The pings are outside the hearing range of most fish, so the marked fish can’t hear them and doesn’t even know he’s being monitored remotely, allowing for incredibly natural behavior. Sounds perfect, right?

Actually…no. While the pinging may not be heard by the fish itself, that doesn’t mean it can’t be heard by other animals. Specifically, other animals who may think fish are particularly tasty. Through a recent study conducted by Amanda L. Stansbury of the University of St Andrews and her colleagues, it was found that not only do gray seals have the capability to hear the supposedly silent pinging, but they’re also able to adapt their behavior to it, actively seeking out fish who wear acoustic tags. A series of trials were conducted, allowing seals to forage through a series of twenty boxes, eighteen of which were empty, and two of which contained fish, with only one of the fish holding an acoustic tag. It is thought the seals originally used smell to seek out the fish-boxes. However, as the seals began to associate the pinging with the presence of a fish, they sought out the tagged fish more and more frequently than the non-tagged fish, suggesting that the seals used the sound in addition to their sense of smell when hunting for fish.

This isn’t the first time something of this nature has been observed. Juvenile tagged salmon have lower survival rates than their non-tagged counterparts. This is a problem for not only salmon, but also for researchers. After all, no matter how hard it is to track a solitary fish in the entire ocean, it’s even harder to track a fish that’s been eaten.

To read the Royal Society’s study:

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/282/1798/20141595

Referenceshttp://www.htisonar.com/what_are_acoustic_tags.htm

http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/saltwater/gamefish-tagging

Submitted by Nick V, Discoverer.

Edited by Jessica F.

This fear tactic is used very skilfully by the global media to control the masses and prevent them from stepping out of line. Banks and insurance companies use fear extremely successfully as part of their marketing campaigns. What if you have an accident… how will you pay for it? Do you have enough hospital insurance? Have you saved enough for your retirement? How will your children pay for their schooling? The brainwashing is endless.

Fear is cleverly imprinted in our subconscious minds and constantly forced down our throats on the daily news with constant exposure to war, violence, murder, poverty, homelessness, hunger, shortages, scarcity, financial instability, etc. There is no good news on television and yet we are drawn to it like flies, complaining and moaning about our miserable lives. Remember – it is called “programming”.
—  Michael Tellinger - UBUNTU Contributionism - A Blueprint For Human Prosperity
Keepin' it Real

A good thing to remember when training:

-There are things that are important, and

-There are things that are actually really important.

Teaching my dogs to confidently and precisely back up onto objects is important to me because it helps their body awareness. Teaching them to spin left and spin right is important because its fun! 

But, teaching them to have a faithful recall away from an unfriendly dog, a road, or anything I don’t want them near is actually really important. Teaching them to respectfully decline from scuffles over bones or toys is actually really important. For those things, it is important to be incredibly aware.

But, for all the other things… keep it real. If it’s not a life or death situation, feel free to take your time. Be patient. If you or your dog is getting frustrated, then it’s not fun! And if it’s not fun, then put in on the back burner for a little while, and come back to it with fresh eyes, a sense of humor, and a lot of treats. 

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Quick examples of a few basic flight concepts I do with my birds to help strengthen their flight, control, muscles, vision, breathing to ensure they are fully capable of flying with precision while maintaining their general health and preparing them for any emergency situations. (older footage was used as well so you may notice differences in their general strength from video to video, and no, the christmas tree is not set up anymore)

There are many more variations of these and far more ways to strengthen flight, what I’ve demonstrated are just a few basics to start with that can easily be adapted and branched off from.

Below are breakdowns of each concept, what they strengthen and what purpose it has to learn the concept along with a short description of each concept.

Keep reading

Although the average man has taken no part in manufacturing moral codes and statute laws, how he obeys them with dog-like submissiveness. He is trained to obedience, like oxen are broken to the yoke of their masters. He is born a thrall habituated from childhood to be governed by others.
—  Ragnar Redbeard

izrakyu9 asked:

One questions ... Is it Ok por a sensei or SHIHAN to punch you or kick you in the gut arms and legs. Without any defence And tell you that is for muscle groing ? I know is tradicional in shito ryu But those punches can realy hurt someone cause you have to take the punch

Some teachers do this to help students develop a breathing technique that allows you to take a hit by effectively “turning your body into armor”. It is usually done while practicing Sanchin. Some styles will have students hold a horse stance or simply lean against a wall and then pound away.

This is normal in many martial arts, but it’s done in a controlled manner. It is usually done one strike at a time, allowing the student to breathe in between each strike, or a burst of strikes in a certain amount of time, usually 10 seconds at a time or as much as 30 seconds.

These exercises are meant to hurt, because the purpose is to teach the body to register pain at higher levels, instead of low impacts that do no real damage.

If you feel, however, that the teacher is going too hard and might seriously hurt you, let him know your concern. You don’t want to accidentally get any real damage. Ask him how you can take the strike with more efficiency.

But if you know he’s not doing it hard enough to cause real damage, and you trust him, then there shouldn’t be any problem.

Yes, it does make your muscles stronger. These strikes force the muscles to break, sort of like micro fracturing bone. When they heal up, they become denser and therefore, stronger.

It takes time, though, you won’t see it happening immediately.

Laura Lawson Visconti Keeps You Strong

30 Minute Workout to Prep For Your Winter Season. 

What’s happenin’ NIKITA Nation! My name is Laura Lawson Visconti, and I am privileged to be one of the ambassadors repping Nikita! A little about me: I currently live in Portland, Oregon (just a hop skip and a jump from Nikita headquarters!) with my husband Nick Visconti, former professional snowboarder and quintessential mountain man. I am your classic right-brained jack-of-all-trades: personal trainer, artist, author, photographer, social media influencer and overall life lover. I work full-time in downtown Portland as a trainer, helping inspire others to live a healthier, more fulfilling life. My interest in fitness originally spawned out of my love for the outdoors. Moving to the Pacific Northwest a few years ago prompted a lifestyle change, one I know you are familiar with: embracing the outdoors and all the “ings” that come with it: trail running, hiking, bicycling, snowboarding, you name it; I can’t get enough. I always tell my clients that investing in a little time in the gym ensures spending a lifetime outside. And that’s really what it’s all about.

Now that the sun’s out and we’re all hurriedly slapping on some suntan lotion and trying to cover up our white legs (or is that just me…?!) it’s more important than ever to stay fit in these off-season months. If you’re a snowboarder, your summer workouts should emphasize squats, core strength and stability. I went ahead and put together a little routine for you focusing on just that – do this workout 1-2 times per week, and you’ll be progressing next winter faster than you can say handplant. Ready to kill it?

30 Minute Core/Leg Workout

Muscles Engaged: Core, Glutes, Hamstrings, Quads, Calves

Materials Needed: 1 heavier dumbbell (I use 20 lbs), 1 medium weight kettlebell (I use 25 lbs), 1 step or bench, BOSU ball, mat, 2 medium weight dumbbells (I use 15 lbs)

Note: When choosing weights, don’t opt for the lightest one you see, but you also don’t want to choose the one you can barely lift. You should be able to lift the weight for 10 reps without straining your back; it should start feeling super challenging about halfway through. Make sure to keep your core engaged at all times – navel in and back straight; imagine tucking your tailbone under your hips.

  • Spend at least 5-10 minutes on a killer cardio warmup before you get started. For bonus points, run or bike to the gym instead of hopping on the elliptical and watching Paula Deen. #daytimeTV
  • Start with 30 seconds of bicycle crunches immediately followed by 30 seconds of mountain climbers. Rest briefly, then repeat.

You’ll want to perform the following strength exercises in a circuit: one immediately followed by the other with minimal rest. This ensures you’re burning fat while simultaneously building muscle. After you’ve completed one set of all three exercises, rest and repeat the circuit two more times.

  •  Perform 24 dips (12 each side) holding your medium weight dumbbells in either hand, one foot on your step with the other straight in front of you on the ground. Make sure to dip nice and low, while keeping your back straight. Don’t let your front knee pass over your ankle (watch yourself in a mirror if necessary to ensure proper form). Don’t lock your knees when you come up; the movements should be fluid and controlled without resting.


  • Next, grab your kettlebell and hold it with both hands in front of you, allowing it to hang. Get into sumo squat position: your feet should be wider than hip distance apart with your toes pointed out on either side. Slowly, lower your torso down to the ground, holding the kettlebell with your elbows locked, until it almost touches the floor and you’re sitting in an invisible chair. Raise back up, without locking your knees out, and lower back down without resting. Complete 20 reps in total. Make sure your core stays tight the whole time. For an extra challenge, hold your squat at the bottom for 5 seconds after every 5 reps.





  • Now let’s challenge those stabilizer muscles and work on your balance. Hop onto a BOSU ball (flat side up) while holding your heavy dumbbell (if you’ve never stepped onto a BOSU before, practice first without the weight). Your feet should be pointing straight ahead on the outer edges of the ball. Hold the weight with both hands and slowly squat down, keeping your chest up and hips down. Make sure you’re squatting through your heels. Get down as low as you can without compromising form, and come up without locking your knees. Complete 20 reps in total.



  • Rest, then repeat circuit. Aim for three sets total with minimal rest in between. Make sure to have plenty of water on hand!

When you’re done, hop on your mat and make time for some yoga and stretch it out. Try a balancing pose or two. The more you work on your balance, strength, and cardio, the more prepared you’ll be when that first pow day hits. Now let’s get out of the gym and start our summer adventures! Yeewwww!!

For more fitness tips and inspiration from Laura Lawson Visconti, check out her blog at lauralawsonvisconti.com or follow her on Instagram @lauralawsonvisconti

Pictured, I am wearing the ­­­­­­­­­­­­Agave bra top. I love it for hot days in the gym, or a bikram yoga class!