conciliator

Jocelyn Bell Burnell (née en 1943), Irlandaise du Nord, découvrit en 1967 ce qui sera plus tard l'un des sujets d'étude majeurs de l'astrophysique : les pulsars. Encore étudiante, elle vit la récompense suprême, le Nobel, lui filer sous le nez à la faveur de ses deux superviseurs hommes. Elle déclara : “On me confiait rarement des travaux de recherche et concilier vie de famille et carrière était très difficile.”

conciliator

sdum mkhan - conciliator, pacifier, peacemaker [JV]

sdum mkhan - mediator, peace maker, conciliator [IW]

sdum pa po - conciliator, pacifier, peacemaker [JV]

sdum pa po - mediator, peace maker, conciliator [IW]

sdum byed - mediator, peace maker, conciliator [IW]

zhi ba'i tshig - good words, (mild, polite) expression, mild language, conciliatory [JV]

Possible symbols for use by the Conciliator (and by extension, Senfal).

This one is messier because I don’t know! I had more ideas. I liked the idea of a drop of blood being involved somehow, because the Conciliator rose on the platform of uniting the castes, but maybe it’s tacky. The six lined emblem seems cool but it’s also really super basic too I guess.

The R was just me being lazy I guess. I thought it looked neat.

The “Triangle” kinda thing stems from me thinking that something involving threes or sixes should be involved somehow. And the final one is a more complicated idea, basically representing the religion (with the Sufferer’s symbol at the center, representing the catalyst that allowed the Conciliator to introduce his revolution, five circles and one triangle, i.e., five dead gods and one alive god).

What do you guys think?

edit: these are all rough drafts, so, they can be touched up and made nicer if any get picked I guess

Aung San Suu Kyi's inexcusable silence

Aung San Suu Kyi was a moral icon, a human rights champion - so why has she been silent about the Rohingya Muslims?


“In awarding the Nobel Peace Prize … to Aung San Suu Kyi,” the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced in 1991, it wished “to honour this woman for her unflagging efforts and to show its support for the many people throughout the world who are striving to attain democracy, human rights and ethnic conciliation by peaceful means”.

Suu Kyi, the Committee added, was “an important symbol in the struggle against oppression”.

Fast forward 24 years, and the Rohingya Muslims of Myanmar might disagree with the dewy-eyed assessment of the five-member Nobel Committee. And with Gordon Brown, too, who called Suu Kyi “the world’s most renowned and courageous prisoner of conscience”. Not to mention Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who has said that the people of Myanmar “desperately need the kind of moral and principled leadership that Aung San Suu Kyi would provide”.

In recent years, the Rohingya Muslims - “the world’s most persecuted minority”, according to the United Nations - have struggled to attract attention to their plight.

Myanmar limits number of babies women can have

Until, that is, a few weeks ago, when thousands of Rohingya refugees began arriving in Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia, while thousands more believed to be still stranded on rickety boats off the coasts of these three countries, with dwindling supplies of food and clean water.

‘So hungry, so skinny’

“Fisherman Muchtar Ali broke down in tears when he set eyes on the overcrowded boat carrying desperate, starving Rohingya off the coast of Indonesia,” noted a report by AFP on May 20.

“I was speechless,” Ali told AFP. “Looking at these people, me and my friends cried because they looked so hungry, so skinny.”

These Rohingya “boat people”, however, are a symptom of a much bigger problem. As Kate Schuetze, Amnesty International’s Asia Pacific Researcher, has observed: “The thousands of lives at risk should be the immediate priority, but the root causes of this crisis must also be addressed. The fact that thousands of Rohingya prefer a dangerous boat journey they may not survive to staying in Myanmar speaks volumes about the conditions they face there.”

Those oppressive conditions range from a denial of citizenship to Myanmar’s 1.3 million Rohingya Muslims to severe restrictions on their movement, employment and access to education and healthcare, as well as a discriminatory law imposing a “two child” limit on Rohingya families in their home state of Rakhine.

Her refusal to condemn, or even fully acknowledge, the state-sponsored repression of her fellow countrymen and women, not to mention the violence meted out to them by Buddhist extremists … makes her part of the problem, not the solution.

Hundreds of thousands have been driven from their homes; their towns and villages razed to the ground by rampaging mobs. In 2014, the government even banned the use of the word “Rohingya”, insisting the Muslim minority, who have lived in that country for generations, be registered in the census as “Bengali”.

Inexcusable silence

So, where does Suu Kyi fit into all this? Well, for a start, her silence is inexcusable. Her refusal to condemn, or even fully acknowledge, the state-sponsored repression of her fellow countrymen and women, not to mention the violence meted out to them by Buddhist extremists inspired by the monk Ashin Wirathu (aka “The Burmese Bin Laden”), makes her part of the problem, not the solution.

“In a genocide, silence is complicity, and so it is with Aung San Suu Kyi,” observed Penny Green, a law professor at the University of London and director of the State Crime Initiative, in a recent op-ed for The Independent. Imbued with “enormous moral and political capital”, Green argued, Myanmar’s opposition leader could have challenged “the vile racism and Islamophobia which characterises Burmese political and social discourse”.

She didn’t. Instead, she spent the past few years courting the Buddhist majority of Myanmar, whose votes she needs in order to be elected president in 2016 - if, that is, the military will allow her to be elected president, or even permit her to stand - by playing down the violence perpetrated against the Muslim minority, and trying to suggest a false equivalence between persecutors and victims of persecution.

In a BBC interview in 2013, for example, Suu Kyi shamefully blamed the violence on “both sides”, telling interviewer Mishal Husain that “Muslims have been targeted but Buddhists have also been subjected to violence”.

Yet in Myanmar, it isn’t Buddhists who have been confined to fetid camps, where they are “slowly succumbing to starvation, despair and disease”. It isn’t Buddhists who have been the victims of what Human Rights Watch calls “ethnic cleansing” and what the UN’s special rapporteur on the human rights situation in Myanmar has said “could amount to crimes against humanity”. It isn’t Buddhists who are crowding onto boats, to try and flee the country, and being assaulted with hammers and knives as they do so. It isn’t Buddhists, to put it bluntly, who are facing genocide.

Risk of 'genocide’

Is this mere hyperbole? If only. Listen to the verdict of investigators from the US Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Simon-Skjodt Center for the Prevention of Genocide.

“We left Burma,” they wrote in a report published earlier this month, “deeply concerned that so many preconditions for genocide are already in place.”

The investigators, who visited Rohingya internment camps and interviewed the survivors of violent attacks, concluded: “Genocide will remain a serious risk for the Rohingya if the government of Burma does not immediately address the laws and policies that oppress the entire community.”

Yet, despite the boats and the bodies, the reports and the revelations, Suu Kyi is still mute. She hasn’t raised a finger to help the Rohingya, as they literally run for their lives. Shouldn’t we expect more from a Nobel Peace Prize laureate?

Maybe not. The words “Henry” and “Kissinger” come to mind. Plus, the Nobel Prize Committee has a pretty awkward history of prematurely handing out peace prizes. Remember Yitzhak Rabin, Shimon Peres and Yasser Arafat’s joint prize in 1994? Ask the children of Gaza how that worked out. Remember Barack Obama’s in 2009? Ask the civilian victims of drone strikes in Pakistan how that worked out.

Rabin, Arafat, Obama … ultimately, of course, they’re all politicians. Suu Kyi was supposed to be something else, something more; a moral icon, a human rights champion, a latter-day Gandhi.

Sad truth

Why weren’t we listening when the opposition leader and former political prisoner told CNN in 2013 that she had “been a politician all along”, that her ambition was to become president of her country?

The sad truth is that when it comes to “The Lady”, it is well past time to take off the rose-tinted glasses. To see Suu Kyi for what she is: A former prisoner of conscience, yes, but now a cynical politician who is willing to put votes ahead of principles; party political advancement ahead of innocent Rohingya lives.

“Ultimately our aim should be to create a world free from the displaced, the homeless and the hopeless,” Suu Kyi grandly declaimed in June 2012, as she finally accepted her Nobel Peace Prize, in person, 21 years after she won it while under house arrest, “a world of which each and every corner is a true sanctuary where the inhabitants will have the freedom and the capacity to live in peace”.

Forget the world. She should try starting at home, with the Rohingya of Rakhine. And if she won’t, or can’t, then maybe she should consider handing back the prize she waited more than two decades to collect.

Source:- http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2015/05/aung-san-suu-kyi-inexcusable-silence-150524085430576.html

In battles with the other Founders, Jefferson constantly referred to “the true principles of the Revolution.” He accused his opponents of “heresy” and “infidelity” in defense of what he called “the holy cause of freedom.”  The result was a palpable distortion of American constitutional meaning, changing the consolidating moment of 1787 into the dangerous states rights principles of the 1798 Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions.  But even more broadly, Jefferson began an impulse, which continues to this day, to take normal political disagreement, policy disagreement, and to convert that disagreement into a dispute over first or fundamental principles.  The result is a kind of apocalyptic politics.  We can’t just have a political disagreement based on differing values or differing policy estimations.  Our dispute is evidence that one of us is engaged in bad faith and betraying founding principles.  That kind of disagreement is harder to tolerate and tends to promote a no-holds barred kind of politics, rather than a politics of compromise, conciliation, and pragmatic action.

President Adams decided to send Dr. Edward Stevens to Cap Français to meet with Toussaint and “conciliate the good opinion of that General and his people.” Pickering’s instructions to Stevens directed him to seek (a.) to end privateering from the ports of Saint Domingue; (b.) to help Toussaint consolidate control of the island; and (c.) to encourage Haitian independence. Stephens was a native of the West Indies who had emigrated to the United States and become a highly respected physician; he was also one of Hamilton’s oldest friends, possibly even a half-brother. Stevens quickly won Toussaint’s confidence; together they established an informal alliance. With Stevens’s help, Toussaint concluded a treaty with the British that removed their forces from the island; American merchants and ships were given unrestricted access to Saint Domingue’s ports. With American naval support, Toussaint was able to defeat the sizable mulatto force that threatened his control of the colony. The American experience with armed intervention in a foreign civil war started here.

Stevens’s actions reflected the consistent direction of Federalist - Hamiltonian - foreign policy in the 1790s: redress the balance between France and Great Britain, preferably reducing the influence of both; promote American commerce; and erode the hold of slavery in the New World. Encouragement of Haitian independence served all three of these ends, and all three are necessary for explaining that policy.

—  Daniel Lang, Hamilton and Haiti

Par ailleurs grâce à griffes.tumblr.com et aux conseils de dsata.tumblr.com , je suis également plongée dans le passionnant essai de Mona Chollet, “Chez soi, une odyssée de l'espace domestique”, question qui me passionne, et dans laquelle elle interroge ce besoin qu'ont certains d'entre nous d'être BEAUCOUP chez eux (et qui généralement se sentent vaguement coupables tant la société valorise les aventuriers, ceux qui ne sont pas frileux et repliés sur eux-mêmes), et qui cependant sont aussi BEAUCOUP sur le net. Je me sens concernée, voyez-vous.
“Pourquoi le travail domestique est-il autant méprisé ? Comment concilier l’intérieur (le confort du salon) avec l’extérieur (le monde tel que raconté sur Internet, par exemple) ? Pour faire le tour de ce vaste sujet, Mona Chollet convoque la philosophie et l’architecture, le féminisme et la politique, Instagram et le ­travail du dimanche. Et cite, pêle-mêle, Gaston Bachelard et Georges Perec, Raoul Vaneigem et Virginia Woolf, Nicolas Bouvier et Betty Friedan. Éclectique et pop, cet ouvrage nous fait considérer autrement le «chez-soi» : qu’on se le dise, notre table basse est, elle aussi, politique.” Libération.

MUST Read & Help the people, ASSK.: Aung San Suu Kyi's inexcusable silence

By Mehdi Hasan via aljazeera

Aung San Suu Kyi was a moral icon, a human rights champion - so why has she been silent about the Rohingya Muslims?

“In awarding the Nobel Peace Prize … to Aung San Suu Kyi,” the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced in 1991, it wished “to honour this woman for her unflagging efforts and to show its support for the many people throughout the world who are striving to attain democracy, human rights and ethnic conciliation by peaceful means”.

Suu Kyi, the Committee added, was “an important symbol in the struggle against oppression”.


Fast forward 24 years, and the Rohingya Muslims of Myanmar might disagree with the dewy-eyed assessment of the five-member Nobel Committee. And with Gordon Brown, too, who called Suu Kyi “the world’s most renowned and courageous prisoner of conscience”. Not to mention Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who has said that the people of Myanmar “desperately need the kind of moral and principled leadership that Aung San Suu Kyi would provide”.
In recent years, the Rohingya Muslims - “the world’s most persecuted minority”, according to the United Nations - have struggled to attract attention to their plight.

Until, that is, a few weeks ago, when thousands of Rohingya refugees began arriving in Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia, while thousands more believed to be still stranded on rickety boats off the coasts of these three countries, with dwindling supplies of food and clean water.


‘So hungry, so skinny’


“Fisherman Muchtar Ali broke down in tears when he set eyes on the overcrowded boat carrying desperate, starving Rohingya off the coast of Indonesia,” noted a report by AFP on May 20.


“I was speechless,” Ali told AFP. “Looking at these people, me and my friends cried because they looked so hungry, so skinny.”


These Rohingya “boat people”, however, are a symptom of a much bigger problem. As Kate Schuetze, Amnesty International’s Asia Pacific Researcher, has observed: “The thousands of lives at risk should be the immediate priority, but the root causes of this crisis must also be addressed. The fact that thousands of Rohingya prefer a dangerous boat journey they may not survive to staying in Myanmar speaks volumes about the conditions they face there.”
Those oppressive conditions range from a denial of citizenship to Myanmar’s 1.3 million Rohingya Muslims to severe restrictions on their movement, employment and access to education and healthcare, as well as a discriminatory law imposing a “two child” limit on Rohingya families in their home state of Rakhine.

Hundreds of thousands have been driven from their homes; their towns and villages razed to the ground by rampaging mobs. In 2014, the government even banned the use of the word “Rohingya”, insisting the Muslim minority, who have lived in that country for generations, be registered in the census as “Bengali”.
Inexcusable silence.


So, where does Suu Kyi fit into all this? Well, for a start, her silence is inexcusable. Her refusal to condemn, or even fully acknowledge, the state-sponsored repression of her fellow countrymen and women, not to mention the violence meted out to them by Buddhist extremists inspired by the monk Ashin Wirathu (aka “The Burmese Bin Laden”), makes her part of the problem, not the solution.


“In a genocide, silence is complicity, and so it is with Aung San Suu Kyi,” observed Penny Green, a law professor at the University of London and director of the State Crime Initiative, in a recent op-ed for The Independent. Imbued with “enormous moral and political capital”, Green argued, Myanmar’s opposition leader could have challenged “the vile racism and Islamophobia which characterises Burmese political and social discourse”. 


She didn’t. Instead, she spent the past few years courting the Buddhist majority of Myanmar, whose votes she needs in order to be elected president in 2016 - if, that is, the military will allow her to be elected president, or even permit her to stand - by playing down the violence perpetrated against the Muslim minority, and trying to suggest a false equivalence between persecutors and victims of persecution.


In a BBC interview in 2013, for example, Suu Kyi shamefully blamed the violence on “both sides”, telling interviewer Mishal Husain that “Muslims have been targeted but Buddhists have also been subjected to violence”.

Yet in Myanmar, it isn’t Buddhists who have been confined to fetid camps, where they are “slowly succumbing to starvation, despair and disease”. It isn’t Buddhists who have been the victims of what Human Rights Watch calls “ethnic cleansing” and what the UN’s special rapporteur on the human rights situation in Myanmar has said “could amount to crimes against humanity”. It isn’t Buddhists who are crowding onto boats, to try and flee the country, and being assaulted with hammers and knives as they do so. It isn’t Buddhists, to put it bluntly, who are facing genocide.


Risk of 'genocide’


Is this mere hyperbole? If only. Listen to the verdict of investigators from the US Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Simon-Skjodt Center for the Prevention of Genocide.


“We left Burma,” they wrote in a report published earlier this month, “deeply concerned that so many preconditions for genocide are already in place.”
The investigators, who visited Rohingya internment camps and interviewed the survivors of violent attacks, concluded: “Genocide will remain a serious risk for the Rohingya if the government of Burma does not immediately address the laws and policies that oppress the entire community." 


Yet, despite the boats and the bodies, the reports and the revelations, Suu Kyi is still mute. She hasn’t raised a finger to help the Rohingya, as they literally run for their lives. Shouldn’t we expect more from a Nobel Peace Prize laureate?
Maybe not. The words "Henry” and “Kissinger” come to mind. Plus, the Nobel Prize Committee has a pretty awkward history of prematurely handing out peace prizes. Remember Yitzhak Rabin, Shimon Peres and Yasser Arafat’s joint prize in 1994? Ask the children of Gaza how that worked out. Remember Barack Obama’s in 2009? Ask the civilian victims of drone strikes in Pakistan how that worked out. 


Rabin, Arafat, Obama … ultimately, of course, they’re all politicians. Suu Kyi was supposed to be something else, something more; a moral icon, a human rights champion, a latter-day Gandhi.


Sad truth


Why weren’t we listening when the opposition leader and former political prisoner told CNN in 2013 that she had “been a politician all along”, that her ambition was to become president of her country?


The sad truth is that when it comes to “The Lady”, it is well past time to take off the rose-tinted glasses. To see Suu Kyi for what she is: A former prisoner of conscience, yes, but now a cynical politician who is willing to put votes ahead of principles; party political advancement ahead of innocent Rohingya lives.
“Ultimately our aim should be to create a world free from the displaced, the homeless and the hopeless,” Suu Kyi grandly declaimed in June 2012, as she finally accepted her Nobel Peace Prize, in person, 21 years after she won it while under house arrest, “a world of which each and every corner is a true sanctuary where the inhabitants will have the freedom and the capacity to live in peace”.

Forget the world. She should try starting at home, with the Rohingya of Rakhine. And if she won’t, or can’t, then maybe she should consider handing back the prize she waited more than two decades to collect.

p a c i f y

Here’s my first ever boyxboy story~


pac·i·fyˈpasəˌfī/Verb1.    Quell the anger, agitation, or excitement of.“he had to pacify angry spectators”synonyms:placate, appease, calm (down), conciliate, propitiate, assuage, mollify, soothe


On Third Person’s POV


“What the fuck! How many times do I need to tell you not to call me?!” Chanyeol shouted over his phone as he answered Kyungsoo’s call. “Woah there. Calm down dude. It’s me Kyungsoo, I just want to remind you of the upcoming party of Sehun this Saturday. Please do come, we all know that he’s expecting us to come.” Kyungsoo ended the call without letting Chanyeol to speak a word.


Chanyeol thought that it was Baekhyun again who’s calling. He is damn irritated with Baekhyun. Actually Baekhyun and Chanyeol used to be best friends among their circle of friends, not until Baekhyun had his first girlfriend.

Chanyeol was the last one to know about Baekhyun having a girlfriend but the fact that Baekhyun’s girlfriend is the girl that he loves for almost half of his life, hurts him more. He felt betrayed by his only best friend. Chanyeol started to put some barrier between him and Baekhyun, and Baekhyun is aware that their friendship’s slowly fading.

On the other side, their friends were also affected by the awkwardness when the two of them are around. As the eldest hyung in the group, Suho tried to mend the broken friendship of the two, but he failed. Kyungsoo, Kai and Sehun did some efforts, but it all became a waste.

“Penny for your thoughts?” Chanyeol came back into his senses when he heard Kai’s voice. The six of them live in one house together, but most of the time Chanyeol stays home with his family.

“Hey nigga!” Kai became Chanyeol’s best friend, but he admits that their closeness is far different from what he used to have with Baekhyun. “You bitch! Stop calling me nigga!” Chanyeol loves fooling around with Kai’s complexion. “I don’t have a dark complexion, this is what you call bronze skin.” Kai added.

“Whatever you say bronze nigga!” Chanyeol starts to laugh like there’s tomorrow and Kai just ignored what Chanyeol said. “Whatever you say big ears. So is there something bothering you?” Chanyeol stopped laughing.
“Same old problem, huh?” Chanyeol slowly nodded like a child caught in an act. “Dude, why don’t you just stop living in the past and move on.” Kai suggested.

“It’s easy for you to say such this because you don’t know how it feels to be betrayed by your own best friend.” Pain is written all over Chanyeol’s face, until now he’s hurting.

“I am also hurting. We are hurting to see you and Baekhyun treating each other as complete strangers. Baekhyun’s trying to talk to you, but you don’t give a damn to listen.” Chanyeol seems to be surprised by what Kai said.

“Are you telling me that it’s my entire fault?!” Chanyeol exclaimed. “You guys don’t have any idea how painful to see the girl you love and best friend to be deeply in love with each other!” Kai laughed mockingly and shrugged his shoulders. “Maybe you’re right, we don’t have any idea how hurt you are but you don’t also have any idea how hurt your friends are to see you like that!” Kai walked out but before he went farther, “Don’t disappoint Sehun, attend his party.”

Chanyeol felt a pain in his chest. “Do I deserve this pain?” He uttered to his self. Chanyeol decided to go home. On his way home, he saw Baekhyun and Aika walking while holding each other’s hand.

Again, he felt the pain on his chest, but more painful. He placed his right hand on his chest and talked to his reflection on the rear-view mirror. “When will I stop feeling this pain? Will this pain disappear?” He heard continuous horning from his back, then he realized he stopped his car in the middle of the road.

On the day of Sehun’s party, everyone who’s invited came, except for one.
“Hyung, Chanyeol hyung is on his way right?” Sehun asked Suho. Expectation is visible on Sehun’s eyes. “Of course, he’ll come, he texted me few minutes ago and he said it’s traffic so we just need to wait for few more minutes.” Everyone knows it’s a lie, well except for Sehun.
When Sehun left them and entertain his other guests.

“You should have tell Sehun the truth.” Baekhyun whispered to Suho, afraid that Sehun might heard him.

“He’ll be disappointed if I tell him that Chanyeol isn’t coming.” Baekhyun drop his jaw in awe. “You just did. You just disappointed Sehun.” Baekhyun grabbed his phone and dialed Chanyeol’s number.


“Hey best friend!” Baekhyun was surprised with Chanyeol’s greeting.

“Are you drunk?” Baekhyun exclaimed, he can sense it on Chanyeol’s voice. He got the attention of Kyungsoo, Kai and Suho.

“Who’s drunk?” Kyungsoo asked, he has no idea that it is Chanyeol who’s on the other line.

“You care eh?” Chanyeol mockingly asked. Baekhyun has no time for this, he suddenly felt nervous.

“Stop fooling around Park Chanyeol. Where are you?!” Baekhyun almost shouted. But Chanyeol just laughed and didn’t respond. Kai grabbed the phone on Baekhyun’s hand.

“What the fuck Chanyeol! Are you driving?!” He asked as he heard the engine starts.

“Hey there new best buddy! I’ll be heading there. For sure Sehun-ah’s waiting for me.” He said cheerfully. It’s too damn obvious that he’s drunk.


“Please stop the fucking car Chanyeol! Fucking please!” Kai pleaded in frustration because of his friend.

“I can’t! You told me not to disappoint Sehun right? So I’ll come.” Before Kai could respond, he heard a loud thud and loud screech.

“Fuck! Chanyeol! Chanyeol! Are you there?!” But he only heard nothing.
“What the heck is happening?!” Kyungsoo asked in horrified.

Kai ended the call and faced his three friends. “I heard a loud thud and screech! I don’t want to say this but I think Chanyeol got into an accident!” Without saying a word Kyungsoo run out and the three followed.

Suho droved quickly while Kyungsoo’s trying to detect Chanyeol’s location. “That kid will really be the cause of my death!” Suho’s starting to panic. “Shut up hyung! Calm down yourself.” Kyungsoo said as he also try to calm down his self. As for Baekhyun and Kai, they cannot sit still at the passenger seat.

“Why can he be that idiot?!” Baekhyun hissed. Between Chanyeol and Baekhyun, Baekhyun is the one who exerts effort to mend their ruined friendship but Chanyeol doesn’t give any attention to it at all.

“He became more idiot when you and Aika became official.” Kai said bitterly, he isn’t blaming Baekhyun, but that’s the truth. Before Baekhyun can respond, Kyungsoo interrupted them.

“This isn’t the time for you to fight. Have a grip.” The two remained silent.

“Have you detected his location?” Suho asked because he’s driving to nowhere.

“Wait wait. Oh! Here! He’s near the pub.” Faster than a bullet, Suho speed up the car. The three almost fell on their seats and they arrived to the said location in no 10 minutes.

“Damn Suho! If Chanyeol would be the cause of your death then you’ll be the cause of our early death.” Baekhyun complained as he stepped out of the car but he was shock with what he saw.

He saw an accident. An accident involving the car of his best friend. Chanyeol’s car turned upside down. Kyungsoo was the first to run towards Chanyeol’s car while Suho’s trying to call someone and Kai followed Kyungsoo. Baekhyun can’t move a muscle. He’s trying to convince his self that this is just a prank.

In no more than five minutes, the ambulance came. The three other guys rode the ambulance and rushed the covered in blood Chanyeol to the nearest hospital. Luckily Suho handed the key to Baekhyun earlier so he started the engine and made the car fly to the hospital.

“Where’s Chanyeol? How’s he?!” Baekhyun asked in horror but no one dared to answer. No one’s talking, it seems like their all praying for Chanyeol’s safety. Suho’s ringing phone broke the silence.

“Sehun’s calling.” Without saying anything, Kai answered the call. Among the six of them, aside from Chanyeol and Baekhyun, Kai and Sehun has also the kind of friendship. They are best of best friends.

“Suho hyung? Why do you leave so soon? You should’ve at least told me.” Now, Sehun’s maknae side is showing up.

“Sehun-ah, this is Kai, we’re very sorry for leaving your party without saying a word, we’re here on the hospital right now.” Kai explained to his best friend. “What are you doing there? What happened?” Sehun asked curiously. They weren’t able to tell Sehun about what happened to Chanyeol earlier. “Chanyeol got into an accident. Without wasting a second Sehun grab his car keys and drove to the hospital that Kai sent after he ended the call.

As if on cue, the doctor came out of the emergency room. "How is he?!” Suho stood up and faced the doctor. “Are you the patient’s guardian?” the doctor asked.

“Yes, I am. Now tell me, how is he?” the doctor sighed deeply that made the four of them nervous. “To be honest with you, he’s in a critical condition right now but we already did our best so we’ll just wait for him to be stable. The impact of the accident was quite terrible so he’s still asleep now, but I guess he’ll wake up sooner or later. Let’s just pray that he can recover soon. You can visit him after transferring to a private room.” And he left after explaining about Chanyeol’s condition.

Kyungsoo asked for assistance to transfer Chanyeol to a private room. Kai and Suho decided to buy foods for them and to bring Chanyeol’s needs, so Baekhyun got no choice but to stay and watch over Chanyeol.

Baekhyun glued his eyes to the sleeping Chanyeol and a warm liquid escaped his eyes. “What have I done to you?” He’s talking to the senseless guy lying on a hospital bed. “Why do things needed to be this complicated?”

“Why do you need to be that idiot, dummy, silly, numb when it comes to love? Why do we need to risk our friendship just because of that damn fucking love? Why do we need to end up like this?” Baekhyun asked as he wiped the tears running down his face. He just remained silent after asking the things he surely cannot ask once Chanyeol woke up.

“What the fuck are you doing here?” Chanyeol asked with almost inaudible voice, it’s obvious that he’s in pain and tired, as he saw the guy whom he thought betrayed him. “Just don’t mind me. Sleep and have a rest.” Baekhyun ignored what Chanyeol said.

“Get out of my room.” Anger and pain is visible in his eyes. “I will when you’re already asleep.”

“Stop this shit Byun Baekhyun! Cut out your drama! Stop acting like you care! I don’t fuck–” Before Chanyeol could finish his rants, Baekhyun placed his lips towards Chanyeol’s and it made Chanyeol shut up.
“If kiss is the only way to pacify then I would, even every day.” Chanyeol’s lips are still parted a little after being shut up with a kiss by Baekhyun. “To tell you honestly Chanyeol, I don’t love Aika. I never did.”

“Pacifying me through a kiss then now you’re telling me you never loved Aika?! Then FUCK YOU! YOU MADE ME MISERABLE, YOU MADE ME FURI–” Again, Baekhyun kissed him, but now more passionately. Baekhyun isn’t waiting for a respond from Chanyeol, he just want him to shut up and listen to his explanation first. When Chanyeol was about to respond, Baekhyun pull off his self away from Chanyeol.

“Now listen to me Park Chanyeol, first of all I am sorry for making you miserable, furious and whatever you say and yeah, to be honest Aika knows that I don’t love her and the feeling is mutual. She doesn’t also love me.” He paused for a while and waiting for a word from Chanyeol but he heard nothing so he continued. “I asked her to be my girlfriend because I hate it when the two of us are together, you always talked about her. You’re too dense to feel that I am jealous with her. You are always pre-occupied by Aika and sometimes you’re ignoring me just because of her. If you love her for almost half of your life, well I do love you since I met you. I did not fell in love, I became in love with you. Well, it’s a shit. I just made you laid on this fucking hospital bed, and made you cry every time I am with Aika. I am really stupid for trying hard to make you fall for me but damn, you just fell deeper for her not to me. Now that I already told you the truth, I can now move on and let you be happy.”

Baekhyun already turned his back from Chanyeol but before he could make step, Chanyeol grabbed his hands pulled him towards him.

“I guess I need to pacify my pacifier.” Chanyeol kissed Baekhyun torridly yet passionately. The two of them can hear the loud thud from their heart. Before they could go even further, they both pull off their selves. “You pacified with a kiss huh? Now let me pacify you with my love.” Chanyeol tried to reach Baekhyun and kisses his forehead.

“You quell my anger towards you, now let me quell the pain I caused you. After being pacified you, I realized I need you more than Aika. I love you my pacifier.” Chanyeol said as he held the hands of Baekhyun and kiss

-THE END :)


Fictional Monarch Spotlight: King Jaehaerys I Targaryen (Game of Thrones)

Jaehaerys I Targaryen, known as the Conciliator, the Wise or the Old King, was the fourth Targaryen King of the Seven Kingdoms, ruling from 48–103 AC. He was a dragonrider whose mount was Vermithor. He was the grandson of Aegon the Conqueror.

Jaehaerys was the third son of King Aenys and Alyssa Velaryon. During the Faith Militant uprising, when Aenys thought King’s Landing too unsafe, he fled to Dragonstone with his wife and all his children except for his eldest two, Aegon and Rhaena, who were in the Westerlands at this time.

Dragonstone was held by Visenya Targaryen, whose counsel was for Aenys to bring “fire and blood” to the Faith of the Seven. Aenys, never the most robust, fell seriously ill. The Dowager Queen Visenya took over his care and Aenys briefly improved. Aenys then suffered a collapse when he learned his son and daughter were besieged at Crakehall, and died later. Upon his death Visenya mounted her dragon and flew to Pentos to retrieve her son Maegor.

Due to the plotting of Visenya, Maegor took the Iron Throne before Jaehaerys’ eldest brother Aegon. Visenya kept Jaehaerys, his mother and sister hostage on Dragonstone for two years while her son fought the Faith Militant. Maegor took Jaehaerys’ older brother Viserys with him as a squire and hostage to ensure Alyssa’s good behavior.

Prince Aegon fought Maegor I to reclaim his father’s throne, but was slain by Maegor at the Battle Beneath the Gods Eye.

In 44 AC, Visenya passed away. The chaos of her death gave Alyssa an opportunity to escape with Jaehaerys and Alysanne. She also took the Valyrian sword Dark Sister. They eventually found sanctuary at Storm’s End. Maegor, as punishment, had her son Prince Viserys tortured to death, leaving his mutilated body in the courtyard of King’s Landing to rot.

By 48 AC the realm had had enough of Maegor’s tyrannical rule. Jaehaerys, the last surviving son of King Aenys, put forth a new claim for the Iron Throne and was supported by Robar Baratheon, the Lord of Storm’s End whom Jaehaerys named Protector of the Realm and Hand of the King.

After Maegor’s mysterious death on the Iron Throne, Jaehaerys was crowned at the age of fourteen and wed to his sister Alysanne.

Jaehaerys inherited from his uncle’s reign a war with the Faith Militant, known as the Faith Militant uprising. Maegor had used brutal methods to eradicate the rebellion, such as placing bounties on the heads of all members of the Faith Militant, but the rebellion had continued. Jaehaerys instead pacified the rebellion with the offer of amnesty for all participants and the disbanding of the Faith Militant. The offer was accepted and the orders disbanded on the condition that the Iron Throne would always defend the Faith of the Seven. This act earned him the name “the Conciliator.” Jaehaerys later in his reign also took away the right of the Faith to conduct criminal trials. This pleased many as there had often been complaints of unscrupulous septries and septons making free with the wealth and property of their neighbors and those they preached to.

Jaehaerys ruled for 55 years, becoming the longest-ruling of the Targaryen kings, which led to him also being referred to as the “Old King”. Jaehaerys brought to the realm a time of great peace and prosperity, aided by his beloved sister-wife, Good Queen Alysanne. Alysanne convinced him to abolish the lord’s right to the first night. Alysanne was Jaehaerys’ great love, while his greatest friend was Septon Barth. Barth worked in the Red Keep’s library due to his keen intelligence. The young Jaehaerys, who loved to read became acquainted with Barth, who attended the King’s books and records. Jaehaerys eventually raised him to be his Hand of the King, an office no commoner had ever held before, nor would hold after. Barth proved more than capable and served as Hand for 40 years.

With Barth’s aid, Jaehaerys reformed the realm more than any king who lived before. Jaehaerys created a unified legal code, so that from the North to the Dornish Marches the realm would share common law. Great works were implemented to improve King’s Landing, such as sewers, drains and wells. Barth believed the fresh water and the flushing away of offal and waste was essential to a cities health. A vast network of roads was built and became known as the Kingsroad, and the king and queen were known to stay at the inn at the crossroads during their journeys, so much so that afterwards it was called the Two Crowns.

Such was Jaehaerys’ wisdom and skill at diplomacy that he even managed to negotiate a truce and bring fifty years of peace between Houses Bracken and Blackwood, two houses whose animosity has lasted for well over two thousand years.

Jaehaerys was known for his love of travel, and once visited the North with Queen Alysanne, six dragons and half his court. His grandson Viserys told his own grandchildren a tale of Jaehaerys flying north to defeat a vast host of wildlings, giants, and wargs at the Wall.

It was during Jaehaerys’ reign that the Night’s Watch castle Deep Lake was built, which was paid for by his wife’s jewels and built by men Jaehaerys sent north.

Jaehaerys and Alysanne had thirteen children, though only nine lived to adulthood. The eldest son of these nine was Aemon and the second son was Baelon. After Aemon died in 92 AC Jaehaerys chose Baelon as his heir, rather than Aemons daughter Rhaenys. This decision by Jaehaerys caused the Second Quarrel between the king and his wife, which would only be resolved by their daughter, septa Maegelle, in 94 AC.

After his old friend Septon Barth passed away, Jaehaerys chose for his Hand the legendary knight Ser Ryam Redwyne, the Lord Commander of the Kingsguard. Ser Ryam, while a great knight, proved unsuited to the office, and was soon replaced by the king’s son and heir, Prince Baelon.

Baelon died suddenly in 101 AC and Ser Otto Hightower took the office of Hand of the King for Jaehaerys’ final years. Baelon’s death meant the calling of the first Great Council. The Great Council of 101 chose Viserys I, Jaehaerys’ grandson as his new heir.

After the deaths of both his beloved wife and his son Baelon, Jaehaerys’ grief was great. The Old King’s mind began to wander in the last two years of his reign and his time was usually spent bedridden. His new Hand, Otto Hightower, effectively ruled the realm while his daughter Alicent looked after the ailing King, reading to him, washing him and helping to feed him.

Jaehaerys passed away in 103 AC. He was 69 when he died. His body was burned in the Dragonpit and his ashes interred with Good Queen Alysanne’s beneath the Red Keep. All of Westeros mourned, even Dorne.

Jaehaerys’ entire reign is remembered as the most prosperous period in the history of the Targaryen monarchy. His reign brought peace, stability and justice to the Seven Kingdoms. Jaehaerys is possibly the best king that Westeros ever saw and is regarded as such by many historians and laymen.

(Source)

Riyad as-Salihin, The Book of Miscellany Book 1, Hadith 249

Narrated ‘Umm Kulthum bint 'Uqbah (ra):
Messenger of Allah (pbuh) said, 'The person who (lies) in order to conciliate between people is not a liar, when he conveys good or says (something) good".[Al-Bukhari and Muslim].The narration in Muslim added: She said, “I never heard him (she meant the Prophet (pbuh)) giving permission of lying in anything except in three (things): war, conciliating between people and the conversation of man with his wife and the conversation of a woman with her husband”.

The almost-but-not-quite Baratheon queen consort

Jocelyn Baratheon

From [the union of Robar Baratheon and Alyssa Velaryon] sprang the Lady Jocelyn, who married the eldest of the Old King’s sons [Prince Aemon] and became mother to the Princess Rhaenys—“the Queen Who Never Was” as the glib jester Mushroom called her.

~ The World of Ice and Fire

The children of Jaehaerys I, the Conciliator, and Good Queen Alysanne, who lived to adulthood:

PRINCE AEMON - Killed in battle against Myrish pirates who had seized the eastern side of Tarth.

~ The World of Ice and Fire

Borros Baratheon’s unnamed eldest daughter

In the early part of the war, Lord Borros proved reluctant to face the dragons personally. But toward the end of the Dance, he and his stormlanders seized King’s Landing during the Moon of the Three Kings, restoring the city to order and winning promises that his eldest daughter would become the new queen of the widowed King Aegon II.

Though Rhaenyra was dead and Aegon the Younger was in his hands, Aegon II still had many enemies who continued to fight against him. They fought as much out of fear of his reprisals as they did for Rhaenyra, but they fought, and they proved the greater foe. When Lord Borros Baratheon at last stirred with his strength, marching against what remained of Rhaenyra’s forces, there might have been a chance to turn the tide. But Lord Borros fell at the Battle of the Kingsroad, his host shattered. 

~ The World of Ice and Fire

Lyonel Baratheon’s unnamed daughter

Lord Lyonel had always been amongst King Aegon’s most leal supporters; so firm was their friendship that His Grace gladly agreed to betroth his eldest son and heir to Lord Lyonel’s daughter. All was well until Prince Duncan met and became smitten with the mysterious woman known only as Jenny of Oldstones (a witch, some say), and took her for his wife in defiance of his father the king.

~ The World of Ice and Fire

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