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Here are my theories revolving capture technology in a realistic pokemon world. I’ve had the idea rattling around in my head for quite a while, but I just got a prompt to get it on paper, so I thought I would share it!

PART 1. – The first step is the Silph Co. branded Intellechip (name pending, lol) This chip is the key for my idea and is mass produced. The basic idea for step one is that upon turning sixteen, you can apply for an adult Pokémon licence ( until this age, you are considered a minor and have to be registered under your parent or guardians licence, so family pets are fine, but you can’t buy or use poke balls for example, until the age of 16).

When you apply for you licence, this chip is implanted into the palm of your hand. This then connects with the pokedex you are given, which also contains a similar chip. This transfer’s information about you once inputted and is essentially your trainer identification. It also keeps track of your health, has your phone numbers and data etc, and loads of other cool gadgetry. The main point is that it knows you and keeps track of you. In terms of who keeps track of this basic info on yourself, Silph co is a conglomerate that has branches in the police, security and of course, ties to the Pokémon league. No particularly personal information would be there, only stuff that you yourself would be happy putting there, but as it’s a mobile phone, or smartphone, it could be used for online and wireless bank transfers when you lose a match, satellite navigation to the nearest Pokémon centre and various other purposes.

 Whilst they are expensive, there is extended warranty on pokedexes etc, so it’s not too bad to replace. In case of identity theft, if someone were to take your pokedex and try and use it as a fake ID, the dex would read the other persons chip, or lack thereof, and report itself stolen instantly. It has to be close to its trainer to be used as an official league licence, so there Is a good degree of security.

PART 2. – Pokeballs also contains chips. They have two in fact, one for themselves and one that is implanted into Pokémon upon capture. When you purchase a pokeball, it interacts wirelessly with the one in your hand and the one in your pokedex, meaning that it is registered to you to a specific ID and cannot be stolen. Again, there is a degree of security surrounding this kind of equipment. I do imagine, however, that Pokeballs without Pokémon in them can be hacked or gifted to other trainers, but only through use of the pokedex system allowing an official transfer. If they are empty, I don’t imagine them being too hard at all to gift.

This also means that when they are thrown and are not broken, they gravitate back to the trainers palm (ever wondered why they bounce back in a lot of the anime?) meaning they are easier to track if thrown or lost. It also means during battle, they return swiftly to the palm, meaning the trainer can recall the Pokémon at will if they feel it is in danger or needs to be switched out.

PART 3. – When capturing a Pokémon, the pokeball tags the Pokémon with a chip, in the same way we tag our pets. It’s perfectly harmless as the Pokémon is reduced to its ‘energy’ state within the ball. This chip then sends the Pokémon’s data, information, height, weight and all vital signs immediately to the pokedex so that you have a complete and whole view of the creature you have just obtained. It is also at this stage that you can input a nickname.

This means you can monitor the Pokémon’s health directly on the screen, which is what I imagine the ‘HP bar’ to be in a realistic setting. Rather than simply beating each other to a pulp until one or the other goes down, it means they can keep track of how they are doing and switch them out when they are low or injured. In a realistic setting, death is not an unlikely situation, especially for new Pokémon trainers.

This also means that in ‘official’ matches, so with gym leaders, league members or in special battle grounds, this information is transferred to the large screen as shown in the example picture, so that the entire audience can keep track of the match details and how things are going. Think of it as the information that plays about the team as a football match is going on. It also links with a registered pc of your choice, or wirelessly to the cloud network that is available in all Pokémon centres.

This means that, as I imagine a lot of trainers to take laptops with them, they can access their items, plug them in at a local centre and access their whole list of Pokémon, their items, their mail, etc. Upon capture, you also get the option to swap the Pokémon into your team by transferring one from your belt to the pc. Everything is simple and automatic for today’s trainer-on-the-go! (as for PC systems themselves, that’s for another time, though I do imagine it to be much harder to own masses of Pokémon, as they can’t be kept in a box for too long. In fact, I don’t imagine there to be a ‘box’ at all, the pc is just a way of accessing them. They could be sent to live with your parents, a guardian, a friend or a day care in your town, which I imagine to be a very big business and therefore a viable option to keep 10-20 Pokémon per trainer without being cruel.)

PART 4. – The pokedex is also the way TM’s and HM’s are able to be taught to Pokémon. The CD’s are obtained and kept in small cases that can then be installed into the pokedex. Once inside, they can then be taught to any Pokémon in your team of six wirelessly using the chips. As the information is essentially downloading straight into the ball and then into the Pokémon, it’s instantaneous. (In this highly technologically advanced world, I don’t see this as being much of an issue or a question of morals, but eh)

There are a whole load of other things I would like to explore with this idea, but for now, these are the main aspects. It means that information is able to travel freely and swiftly in a world where everything is very fast-moving. I hope this has been explained clearly enough, and do let me know if you think it would make an interesting part to a poster collection, or trainer guide. I also plan on doing information on battles and gym leaders, as well as the league itself. Thanks guys! 

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Tiny chip mimics brain, delivers supercomputer speed

Researchers Thursday unveiled a powerful new postage-stamp size chip delivering supercomputer performance using a process that mimics the human brain.

The so-called “neurosynaptic” chip is a breakthrough that opens a wide new range of computing possibilities from self-driving cars to artificial intelligence systems that can installed on a smartphone, the scientists say.

The researchers from IBM, Cornell Tech and collaborators from around the world said they took an entirely new approach in design compared with previous computer architecture, moving toward a system called “cognitive computing.”

"We have taken inspiration from the cerebral cortex to design this chip," said IBM chief scientist for brain-inspired computing, Dharmendra Modha, referring to the command center of the brain.

Read more

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State of the Art: the Evolution of the Computer Chip

Published less than three decades after the first integrated circuit ever produced, Stan Augarten’s State of the Art (1983) demonstrates how rapidly the new technology developed. In a comprehensive survey ranging from the earliest hand-soldered circuits of the 1950s to American Microsystems’ sleek S4535 High-Voltage Driver produced in 1982, the book presents computer chips like works of art, aesthetic icons of the nascent digital revolution. Perhaps most notable is the way the technology quickly evolved out of human hands and into a complex mechanized process requiring precision at an atomic level. Indeed, Jack S. Kilby built the first integrated circuit at Texas Instruments by hand. But his groundbreaking solution, which eliminating the need for individual discrete components by making a “monolithic” circuit from one material, allowed for automation to soon take over. Today the most advanced circuits contain several hundred millions of components on an area no larger than a fingernail and must be manufactured under highly delicate conditions. Laid bare as objects, their mysterious hieroglyphics seem to reveal the intricate, arcane processes that produced them. 

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District 3 is responsible for technology/electronics. For this design, I tried to make it look like a computer chip. I went over the lines with glow-in-the-dark nail polish because I thought it suited the technology theme :) It took me a while to find a good glow-in-the-dark nail polish but I ended up using the one from Urban Outfitters. It works well if you hold it up to a light to “charge”.

On another note, I tried Dragon Boat racing for the first time last Thursday. I gotta say, I don’t think I’ve ever been so sore before. Despite the soreness, I’m glad I went and I look forward to doing it again and trying other new things. Also, don’t forget this weekend is Father’s Day! See y’all soon.

6/12/13

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Products used:

  • Essie Protein Base Coat
  • Maybelline 5 Day Nail Color in “Black Magic”
  • Dashing Diva nail polish in “Fashion District”
  • BTOUCH nail art polish in 60
  • Urban Outfitters Glow nail polish in Yellow
  • Lechat Ultra Fast Dry Polish Top Coat

Computer Chip Mimics Features of Real Brain

Researchers have designed a computer chip with brain-like wiring and architecture that can perform sophisticated tasks in real-time while consuming very little energy. The chip paves the way for the design of computer devices suited to tasks conventional computer chips are unable to do well. The researchers’ basic building block was a core comprising 256 input lines (“axons”) and 256 output lines (“neurons”). They connected more than 4,000 such cores and implemented them on a digital computer chip called “TrueNorth,” which has over 256 million “synapses” that trade electrical signals.

Read more about this research from the 8 August issue of Science here.

[Image courtesy of IBM Research. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

New Chip Design Fuses Electronics and Photonics By Combining Silicon and Graphene

Physicist Swastik Kar and mechanical engineer Yung Joon Jung lay belts of carbon nanotubes on top of a silicon wafer. The junction created by the intersection of the two materials proved to be highly sensitive to light; shining a laser spot on it caused a sharp rise in the light-induced current. That allowed the pair to build logic circuits that could be manipulated both electrically and optically.

“What we’ve done is built a tiny device where one input can be a voltage and the other input can be light,” Kar says. The researchers built an optoelectronic AND gate and a two-bit optoelectronic ADDER/OR gate. They also built a four-bit digital-to-analog converter. Shining spots of light onto an array of these junctions converts the digital signal of the laser into an analog current, with the strength of the current depending on the on/off pattern of the laser.

Jung creates the nanotubes in solution, and they can then be placed on a patterned silicon/silicon oxide substrate, so the technology should be compatible with existing CMOS processes, he says. The process should also be reproducible and scalable to large numbers of junctions.

Using light to both move data around a chip and perform some of the logic operations should save time and make the chip work faster, according to the pair. Just how much faster they can’t say yet, as this is only an early step toward an actual chip.

(via Nanotubes Make Logic Circuits that Use Both Light and Current - IEEE Spectrum)

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