comcast

7 Colorado towns just gave big cable the finger 

Residents of seven communities in Colorado sent a resounding message to cable companies Tuesday: We’re tired of your Internet service, so we’re going to get our own.

Voters in seven cities and counties have agreed to let their local governments provide Internet service, thereby giving big broadband companies some much-needed competition. It’s a solution that has made service cheaper, faster and more reliable.

And it’s popular, too.

Comcast customer service is so legendarily bad that hyperbole has become pretty much impossible. But why? If this entire massive corporation hates their own customers so much, why bother providing Internet service at all instead of, say, a cable that delivers an endless stream of spiders straight into our homes? Well, we decided to track down three members of Comcast’s customer service strike force, and discovered that this phenomenon is far more complicated and far stranger than we thought…

5 Nightmares You Live Working for America’s Worst Company

If you woke up tomorrow, and your internet looked like this, what would you do? 

Imagine all your favorite websites taking forever to load, while you get annoying notifications from your ISP suggesting you switch to one of their approved “Fast Lane” sites.

Think about what we would lose: all the weird, alternative, interesting, and enlightening stuff that makes the Internet so much cooler than mainstream Cable TV. What if the only news sites you could reliably connect to were the ones that had deals with companies like Comcast and Verizon?

On September 10th, just a few days before the FCC’s comment deadline, public interest organizations are issuing an open, international call for websites and internet users to unite for an “Internet Slowdown” to show the world what the web would be like if Team Cable gets their way and trashes net neutrality. Net neutrality is hard to explain, so our hope is that this action will help SHOW the world what’s really at stake if we lose the open Internet.

If you’ve got a website, blog or tumblr, get the code to join the #InternetSlowdown here: https://battleforthenet.com/sept10th

Everyone else, here’s a quick list of things you can do to help spread the word about the slowdown: http://tumblr.fightforthefuture.org/post/96020972118/be-a-part-of-the-great-internet-slowdown  

Ryan Block called Comcast, his internet provider, to cancel his account, but the ‘retention specialist’ on the other end of the line really didn’t want him to do that. The resulting conversation was painful to say the least.

Now Comcast has contacted Block directly to issue a cringe-inducing apology: “We are using this very unfortunate experience to reinforce how important it is to always treat our customers with the utmost respect.”

Get through to Comcast’s semi-secret customer service line with one of these special cards
For years, Comcast has been giving its employees special cards to hand out to customers who had “a negative or unpleasant experience that is unresolved.” Once called “Make It Right” cards and recently rebranded as “We’re On It” cards, the cards are printed with a unique ID number and a “no wait” hotline that connects to a dedicated team of 250 customer service agents. Employees receive 12 cards a year, which they can hand out at their discretion.