collimator

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The upper atmosphere of the Sun is dominated by plasma filled magnetic loops (coronal loops) whose temperature and pressure vary over a wide range. The appearance of coronal loops follows the emergence of magnetic flux, which is generated by dynamo processes inside the Sun. Emerging flux regions (EFRs) appear when magnetic flux bundles emerge from the solar interior through the photosphere and into the upper atmosphere (chromosphere and the corona). The characteristic feature of EFR is the -shaped loops (created by the magnetic buoyancy/Parker instability), they appear as developing bipolar sunspots in magnetograms, and as arch filament systems in . EFRs interact with pre-existing magnetic fields in the corona and produce small flares (plasma heating) and collimated plasma jets. The GIFs above show multiple energetic jets in three different wavelengths. The light has been colorized in red, green and blue, corresponding to three coronal temperature regimes ranging from ~0.8Mk to 2MK. 

Image Credit: SDO/U. Aberystwyth

One of the first images from the CMSdetector, a key component of the LHC, showing the debris of particles picked up in the detector’s calorimeters and muon chambers after the beam was steered into the collimator (tungsten block) at point 5 (Image: CERN)

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How To Test Fiber Optic Splitters Or Other Passive Devices

A fiber optic splitteris a device that splits the fiber optic light into several parts by a certain ratio. For example, when a beam of fiber optic light transmitted from a 1X4 equal ratio splitter, it will be divided into 4-fiber optic light by equal ratio that is each beam is ¼ or 25% of the original source one. A Optical Splitter is different from WDM. WDM can divide the different wavelength…

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CERN - First images of collisions at 13 TeV












CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research logo.

May 22, 2015


Image above: Test collisions continue today at 13 TeV in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to prepare the detectors ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb, LHCf, MOEDAL and TOTEM for data-taking, planned for early June (Image: LHC).

Last night, protons collided in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the record-breaking energy of 13 TeV for the first time. These test collisions were to set up systems that protect the machine and detectors from particles that stray from the edges of the beam.


Image above: Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the ALICE detector (Image: ALICE).

A key part of the process was the set-up of the collimators. These devices which absorb stray particles were adjusted in colliding-beam conditions. This set-up will give the accelerator team the data they need to ensure that the LHC magnets and detectors are fully protected.


Image above: Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the CMS detector (Image: CMS).

Today the tests continue. Colliding beams will stay in the LHC for several hours. The LHC Operations team will continue to monitor beam quality and optimisation of the set-up.


Image above: Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the ATLAS detector (Image: ATLAS).

This is an important part of the process that will allow the experimental teams running the detectors ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb, LHCf, MOEDAL and TOTEM to switch on their experiments fully. Data taking and the start of the LHC’s second run is planned for early June


Image above: Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the LHCb detector (Image: LHCb).


Image above: Protons collide at 13 TeV sending showers of particles through the TOTEM detector (Image: TOTEM).

Note:

CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world’s largest and most respected centres for scientific research. Its business is fundamental physics, finding out what the Universe is made of and how it works. At CERN, the world’s largest and most complex scientific instruments are used to study the basic constituents of matter — the fundamental particles. By studying what happens when these particles collide, physicists learn about the laws of Nature.

The instruments used at CERN are particle accelerators and detectors. Accelerators boost beams of particles to high energies before they are made to collide with each other or with stationary targets. Detectors observe and record the results of these collisions.

Founded in 1954, the CERN Laboratory sits astride the Franco–Swiss border near Geneva. It was one of Europe’s first joint ventures and now has 22 Member States.

Related article:

Protons set to collide at 13 TeV to prepare for physics: http://home.web.cern.ch/about/updates/2015/05/protons-set-collide-13-tev-prepare-physics

Related links:

Large Hadron Collider (LHC): http://home.web.cern.ch/topics/large-hadron-collider

ALICE experiments: http://home.web.cern.ch/about/experiments/alice

ATLAS experiments: http://home.web.cern.ch/about/experiments/atlas

CMS experiments: http://home.web.cern.ch/about/experiments/cms

LHCf experiments: http://home.web.cern.ch/about/experiments/lhcf

MOEDAL experiments: http://home.web.cern.ch/about/experiments/moedal

TOTEM experiments: http://home.web.cern.ch/about/experiments/totem

Follow the experiments on Twitter for updates:

@ALICE Experiment: https://twitter.com/ALICEexperiment

@ATLAS Experiment: https://twitter.com/ATLASexperiment

@CMS Experiment: https://twitter.com/CMSexperiment

@LHCb Experiment: https://twitter.com/LHCbExperiment

For more information about the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), visit: http://home.web.cern.ch/

Images (mentioned), Text, Credits: CERN/Cian O'Luanaigh.

Best regards, Orbiter.ch
Full article

E.U.: Accelerator Sets New Hadron Collider Record

Researchers working with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) atom smasher located at the CERN nuclear research facility in Europe have a new Large Hadron Collider record as of a test done on May 20. The new Hadron Collider record comes after the accelerator had been off for two years for needed upgrades, according to the European Organization for Nuclear Research.

New Teraelectronvolts Record Set

The new Hadron Collider record was set when the accelerator was able to reach the energy level of 13 TeV or 13 teraelectronvolts of power for the very first time, thus breaking the previous record energy level or 8 TeV set in 2012. CERN’s goal is to reach an energy level of 14 TeV. Scientists are well on their way to accomplishing that goal as they continue the adventure of studying this thrilling machine and its accomplishments.

“God” Particle Found in 2012

The adventure of discovery had already set one new Hadron Collider record right before it went offline in 2012 by the discovery of the Higgs Bosun or God particle. The particle is believed to be the particle that makes up mass for all things, and what is behind the standard model for all of what makes up the physics of the universe. Because of this, the scientists in charge of the Large Hadron Collider were awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 2013.

Success of Hadron Collider Record Powers Future Experiments

Since CERN has now been successful in setting a new Hadron Collider record, several new tests will be run as the adventure in physics continues. Three of these new experiments will start next month and will be done at the LHC facility. They include ALAS, ATLAS and CMS. The LHC is located in a tunnel underground near Geneva, Switzerland, that is 17 miles long, and considered the largest machine in the world. The scientists bombard billions of protons around at nearly the speed of light and then make them run into each other and when the resulting explosion occurs, the scientists study the results with their special detectors.

Discovering the Secrets of the Universe

The experiments are being done to see how matter particles bond to each other, and the researchers are trying to find what they call a new super particle. In the next few tests, one thing they are doing is calibrating and setting up what is called collimators to protect the LHC as it continues the adventure of trying to set a new Hadron Collider record.

[ Authors ]
Tobias Kramer, Matthias Noack, Daniel Baum, Hans-Christian Hege, Eric J. Heller
[ Abstract ]
We compute trajectories of dust grains starting from a homogeneous surface activity-profile. Despite the homogeneous initial distribution a collimation in jet-like structures becomes visible. The fine structure is caused by topographical features with similar bundles of normal vectors. Gravitational forces are accurately determined from the triangular surface mesh. For the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, we find several areas of good agreement between the homogeneous dust emission model and Rosetta observation of dust jets.

Introduction Une fois la monture installée sur son trépied, on doit procéder à l’installation du tube et à son équilibrage. Ensuite avant de commencer à utiliser son instrument, je recommande de faire une collimation (procédure d’alignement des miroirs) à chaque fois que l’on installe son télescope voire même avant chaque utilisation. Je pense que je […]

Scientists at CERN achieve high power collisions particles in LHC

Scientists at CERN achieve high power collisions particles in LHC

LONDON: For the first time, protons collided in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN at the record-breaking energy of 13 TeV.
These test collisions were part of the systems set up that includes adjusting the collimators that protect the machine and detectors from particles that stray from the edges of the beam. These devices, which absorb stray particles were fine tuned to ensure that the LHC…

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