citizenship

anonymous asked:

Stop bumming off of people???? You're an adult and this is embarrassing.

Anonymous asked you: Don’t cheat people out of their money.

No, you know what’s embarrassing??

That I was held back at customs for more than two fucking hours just because I was flying alone and I’m young and single. That the US custom agent who fucking interrogated me in a room looked me in the eyes and said “I can tell that you’re lying.”

That even though I am currently residing in the US on a legal six months permit I keep getting called an “illegal.” Illegal. Like if I were a crime.

What’s embarrassing is how fucking hard you americans try to keep us out of your country, that the waiting list to be even given the chance to be a legal resident is years long, that the immigration test is so hard not even americans pass it, that even though you’re supposed to have “no official language” there’s an English test to cross the border.

And did I mention that shit is fucking expensive? Do you have $765 to spare? Did you know that fee doesn’t guarantee you your residence in the country?

It’s embarrassing that I have to asks for donations because I can get permanently banned from the fucking country where my girlfriend lives if I try to get employed.

That if I do get employed, my boss will most likely take advantage of me and not pay me like a human being, not pay me the minimum wage or give me a health insurance because I wouldn’t be able to legally demand it.

What’s embarrassing is that I can’t get loans or financial aid or grants because I’m not a legal resident. That I can’t get most scholarships because I’m not a legal resident.  That somehow collage is three times more expensive for me than it is for you because I’m not a legal resident.

That every news article I browse about immigrants is plagued with comments like “go back to your country” and “stop stealing our jobs” even though you know which fucking jobs we get? The hard ones.  The unwanted ones. The ones you americans cannot deign yourself to do.

What’s embarrassing is that my fucking situation “bums you off”. Give me a fucking break.

That, anon, is fucking embarrassing. Fuck off.

Doctoring Freedom: The Politics of African American Medical Care in Slavery and Emancipation by Gretchen Long

For enslaved and newly freed African Americans, attaining freedom and citizenship without health for themselves and their families would have been an empty victory. Even before emancipation, African Americans recognized that control of their bodies was a critical battleground in their struggle for autonomy, and they devised strategies to retain at least some of that control. In Doctoring Freedom, Gretchen Long tells the stories of African Americans who fought for access to both medical care and medical education, showing the important relationship between medical practice and political identity.

Working closely with antebellum medical journals, planters’ diaries, agricultural publications, letters from wounded African American soldiers, WPA narratives, and military and Freedmen’s Bureau reports, Long traces African Americans’ political acts to secure medical care: their organizing mutual-aid societies, their petitions to the federal government, and, as a last resort, their founding of their own medical schools, hospitals, and professional organizations. She also illuminates work of the earliest generation of black physicians, whose adult lives spanned both slavery and freedom. For African Americans, Long argues, claiming rights as both patients and practitioners was a political and highly charged act in both slavery and emancipation.

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Anderson Desir, 9, shares a dream with many boys his age in the Dominican Republic: He wants to grow up and play baseball in la liga grande, otherwise known as American Major League Baseball.

But there’s an important difference between Anderson and the 80 Dominican kids from his summer baseball league in San Pedro de Macoris: Anderson is Haitian.

In a controversial decision last year, the Dominican Constitutional Court ruled that those born in the country are not citizens unless at least one parent is a legal resident.

The decision could cause problems for Haitians living in the Dominican Republic, like Anderson, whose parents brought him here from Haiti shortly after he was born. However, the ruling especially affects an estimated 250,000 Haitian descendants born in the Dominican Republic, including Anderson’s two siblings — his sister Rosaura, 6, and his brother Mickael, 2.

Who’s A Citizen? The Question Dividing The Island Of Hispaniola

Photo Credit: Sarah Tilotta for NPR

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Watch: Strangers admit they’re undocumented citizens in powerful video

How would you feel if you had to tell a stranger a very deep secret that you haven’t told even some of your closest friends? Would it feel empowering of or stifling? Judging from the lastest video produced by Rocsi Diaz, it could be the latter.a newly-released and quietly devestating video, it could be the latter.

In her directorial directional debut, shedirector Rocsi Diaz explores what happens when undocumented citizens reveal their status to people they have just met. Riffing off the viral First Kiss video, theDiaz’s short PSA entitled “The Secrets of Strangers” empowers all immigrants to tell their story. The results are moving.

Watch the full video | Follow policymic

On February 6, 2014 the federal government introduced Bill C-24, a law that changes the Citizenship Act of Canada. This new law changes core aspects of Canadian citizenship as we know it.

If passed, Bill C-24 will make it more difficult for new immigrants to get Canadian citizenship and easier for many Canadians to lose it, especially if they have dual citizenship. Most Canadians do not understand the ways in which Bill C-24 will undermine their fundamental right to be a citizen of Canada. The Canadian Association of Refugee Lawyers has provided a summary of the most important changes to the Citizenship Act. If you are concerned about the loss of citizenship rights for many Canadians, we urge you to contact your member of parliament before Bill C-24 is passed into law.

In Canada, citizenship has always been secure. Whether native-born or immigrant, once you are granted Canadian citizenship, you are secure. Under the current system, you cannot lose your citizenship unless you obtained it by fraud, and even then, a Federal Court judge must make that decision after a full court hearing. Under the current system, if you do not agree with the judge, you have a right of appeal. Under the new law, there will be several ways to lose your citizenship. As well, the decision as to whether you lose your citizenship will be made by a government bureaucrat who will inform you in writing with no opportunity for a live hearing to defend yourself.

Sure, Bush and the neocons lied us into the Iraq War. But you know what? ...

We wanted them to. We BEGGED them to. America went to war with Iraq because Americans bought Bush’s BS. Never forget that fact — and never let anyone off the hook with the phrase, “they lied.”

See, there were voices critical of the war BEFORE it was fought. (Mine was one, but I am a minor academic at a mid-level state school, so therefore I don’t count among the SERIOUSLY SMART PEOPLE who get on talk shows and opine in the pages of the New York Times.) Lots of people — we used to call them experts — knew about life on the ground in Iraq, and the need for nation-building, and the requirements of democracy, and the actual non-commitment of the United States to ANY of these things, and, on the basis of this knowledge (a suspect word these days, admittedly), recommended against the war. The problem was too big and the American effort was too small to end up with anything less than disaster.

But you know what happened to these voices? They got drowned out — and not just by the VERY SERIOUS PEOPLE who all agreed that it was invade-Iraq-or-global terrorist mushroom clouds. Lots of ordinary Americans let their nationalist, xenophobic freak flags fly and attacked anyone who had the temerity to suggest that killing Iraqis was not actually a very good idea. The most insane of these people insisted that to NOT want to kill Iraqis was somehow or another to NOT “support our troops” — since everyone knows all troops want to do is go kill foreigners. (Many of these people are of course now upset we don’t “Support Our Troops” in VA services … that they refuse to pay for in, what do they call it? … oh, yeah: taxes.)

The “Bush lied” statement is true. It’s just not the point. Politicians lie, prevaricate, manipulate, distort: they do politics to get what they want. This is why we call them “politicians,” not “paragons of truth.”

It is our job as democratic citizens to figure out when we’re being lied to and then restrain our political leaders. We failed in Iraq. We enabled. We celebrated. We cackled about shoving boots up enemy asses. But now, after all this, we think we were lied to and that the lies we sprang to salute and defend somehow gets us off the hook for the Iraq disaster.

We did it, people. It’s not Bush’s and the neocons’ fault — or at least it’s not only their fault. It’s all of our faults. And we better remember that before we do something so monumentally stupid ever again.

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Can you pass the US citizenship test?

Every year, thousands of people take the U.S. citizenship exam. To pass the civics portion, which tests knowledge of American politics and history, applicants must correctly answer six out of 10 questions. The questions are randomly selected from a list of 100 with no multiple choice.

The above questions were taken from the list of 100. Admittedly, these are some of the harder ones. Could you pass?

AnswersFollow policymic

New York City is expanding a program that allows local residents with a library card to take home broadband Internet hotspots — sometimes for up to a year. The hotspots allow users to connect up to 10 mobile devices like laptops, tablets, mobile phones, and gaming devices to zippy 4G LTE broadband.

The devices, powered by Sprint, usually cost $49 with a two-year service agreement and a $110 a month fee for 30 GB of data. But New York libraries will loan hundreds of them to residents. The catch? They’re free with unlimited data as long as the borrower is enrolled in a library program, from citizenship classes to adult literacy.

Faith in humanity: restored.

ayanachea asked:

i kind of agree with the anon.. "i can't get a job because my manager will take advantage of me"! UMMMMM NOOOOOO. that's not true. MANY of my friends are illegal and are employed.. AND they get equal pay and get treated equally! it makes me mad that you assume that every american will act like that and try to take advantage of you. because it's not true.

(1) illegal is a slur

without a greencard:

(2) you’re banned permanently from the country at best and you have to pay the fucking trip back yourself

(2)you can get sent to prison just for living in the us if youre not that lucky 

(3) police brutality gets you killed

(4) no social security number means no

  • credit cards
  • no cars
  • no loans
  • no grants
  • no driving permits
  • no bank accounts
  • no health care 
  • no insurances
  • no government help
  • no labor laws protection
  • etc

(5) living in constant paranoia that your classmates / boss / work partners / neighbors will report you

(6) racist white privileged douches like you who dont understand social class struggles or intersectionality

i strongly doubt you have “many friends that are [immigrants] and employed and get treated equally” and even if you do your personal experience will never speak for the struggles of 11.7 million people

Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat said it was “appalling” that the Dominican court has “chosen to commemorate the upcoming 76th anniversary of the October 1937 massacre of thousands of Haitians in the Dominican Republic by stripping Dominican-born men, women, and children of Haitian descent of their citizenship, rendering them not only stateless but unable to attend school or make a living while becoming even more vulnerable to all kinds of hostilities including, increasingly, physical violence.”
—  Junot Diaz
Becoming an American!

Today was my naturalization ceremony for becoming an American citizen.  I’ve been here 26 years and today was a huge milestone in my life.  I’m a dual citizen now, which is pretty cool.  Here’s some photos from today’s ceremony.

The ceremony was at 7:30 this morning, in a city two hours away from us.  Yeah… You can tell its early.

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The ceremony was really nicely done.  They had 75 people from 35 different countries become US citizens today.  I was the only one from Canada.  The highlight was the pair of immigrants from Russia and the Ukraine taking a moment to stop, clap for each others’ countries and hug.  That gives me some measure of hope for the world.

Here’s me with my naturalization certificate!

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I held it for a moment and then… I realized I had become an American.  See?

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IM A ‘Murican.  GO BEARS!!!1111 WOOO, BEER AND GUNS AND JESUS!!!111

(All humor aside, I’m happy to finally become a citizen of the country I’ve lived in since I was five.  I get to vote now too! Yay!)