Thermal paper cash register receipts account for high bisphenol A (BPA) levels in humans

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical that is used in a variety of consumer products, such as water bottles, dental composites and resins used to line metal food and beverage containers, and also is used in thermal paper cash register receipts. Now, research conducted at the University of Missouri is providing the first data that BPA from thermal paper used in cash register receipts accounts for high levels of BPA in humans. Subjects studied showed a rapid increase of BPA in their blood after using a skin care product and then touching a store receipt with BPA.

"BPA first was developed by a biochemist and tested as an artificial estrogen supplement," said Frederick vom Saal, Curators Professor of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Science at MU. "As an endocrine disrupting chemical, BPA has been demonstrated to alter signaling mechanisms involving estrogen and other hormones. Store and fast food receipts, airline tickets, ATM receipts and other thermal papers all use massive amounts of BPA on the surface of the paper as a print developer. The problem is, we as consumers have hand sanitizers, hand creams, soaps and sunscreens on our hands that drastically alter the absorption rate of the BPA found on these receipts."

In the study, researchers tested human subjects who cleaned their hands with hand sanitizer and then held thermal paper receipts. As an added step, subjects who had handled the thermal paper then ate French fries with their hands. The result was that BPA was absorbed very rapidly, vom Saal said.

"Our research found that large amounts of BPA can be transferred to your hands and then to the food you hold and eat as well as be absorbed through your skin," vom Saal said. "BPA exhibits hormone-like properties and has been proven to cause reproductive defects in fetuses, infants, children and adults as well as cancer, metabolic and immune problems in rodents. BPA from thermal papers will be absorbed into your blood rapidly; at those levels, many diseases such as diabetes and disorders such as obesity increase as well. Use of BPA or other similar chemicals that are being used to replace BPA in thermal paper pose a threat to human health."

Researchers Grow Blood Vessel in a Week

The technology for creating new tissues from stem cells has taken a giant leap forward. Two tablespoons of blood are all that is needed to grow a brand new blood vessel in just seven days. This is shown in a new study from Sahlgrenska Academy and Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital published in EBioMedicine.

Just three years ago, a patient at Sahlgrenska University Hospital received a blood vessel transplant grown from her own stem cells. Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson, professor of transplantation biology at Sahlgrenska Academy, and Michael Olausson, surgeon/medical director of the Transplant Center, came up with the idea, planned and carried out the procedure.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/10/researchers-grow-blood-vessel-week

Study Reveals Secrets of Carbonic Acid


Though it garners few public headlines, carbonic acid, the hydrated form of carbon dioxide, is critical to both the health of the atmosphere and the human body. However, because it exists for only a fraction of a second before changing into a mix of hydrogen and bicarbonate ions, carbonic acid has remained an enigma. A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers has yielded valuable new information about carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.

Richard Saykally, a chemist with Berkeley Lab’s Chemical Sciences Division and a professor of chemistry at the University of California (UC) Berkeley, led a study that produced the first X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements for aqueous carbonic acid. These XAS measurements, which were obtained at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source (ALS), were in strong agreement with supercomputer predictions obtained at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/10/study-holds-geological-biological-implications

Hey guys! I’ve already created new account inspired by studyblr and studyspo hashtags which are so motivational!! So firstly..I would like to show u my study area in my room :) As u can see I have lots of pics on my wall ( most of them are on my tumblr account joaanes) On this blog I’d like to share with u my notes, studying ideas etc..Hope u like it! Keep studying everyone 😘😉

Researchers: Comet is Smelly

Rotten eggs, horse urine, formaldehyde, bitter almonds, alcohol, vinegar and a hint of sweet ether. That heady bouquet, according to Swiss researchers, is the “perfume” of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Scientists at the Univ. of Bern say they have determined what the comet would smell like by analyzing the chemicals in its coma, the fuzzy head surrounding the nucleus.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/10/researchers-comet-smelly

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What Makes Food Taste Sweet?

Ever wonder why your favorite sweets taste, well, sweet? Whether they’re made with sugar or artificial sweeteners, it all comes down to chemistry, and a very special shape known as the “sweetness triangle”. Let Darcy Gentleman, who has a Ph.D. in chemistry and snappy dressing take you through the science of sweetness.

Special thanks to Professor Matt Hartings of American University for his help with this episode.

By: ACS Reactions.

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