centerlines

In a previous blog I described the concept of the centerline and I thought I would post a picture to clarify what I mean.

I also include a quote from an article discussing the fighting stance of Baguazhang

'However, when training specifically for fighting, one must learn to “Close the Door” by modifying the body posture and stance to shut off an opponent’s access to one’s centerline, both above and below the waist.  “Closing the Door” protects the body’s "Center Gate" (Chung Men), and covers all possible paths through which an opponent can attack.’

The non-Avatar pictures can be found here, here and here.

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While the existence of a “central axis” concept is unified in Wing Chun, the interpretation of the centerline concept itself is not. Many variations exist, with some lineages defining anywhere from a single “centerline” to multiple lines of interaction and definition. Traditionally the centerline is considered to be the vertical axis from the top of a human’s head to the groin. The human body’s prime striking targets are considered to be on or near this line, including eyes, nose, throat, solar plexus, stomach, pelvis and groin.

Wing Chun techniques are generally “closed”, with the limbs drawn in to protect the central area and also to maintain balance. In most circumstances, the hands do not move beyond the vertical circle that is described by swinging the arms in front, with the hands crossed at the wrists. To reach outside this area, footwork is used. A large emphasis and time investment in training Chi Sao exercise emphasizes positioning to dominate this centerline. The stance and guard all point at or through the center to concentrate physical and mental intent of the entire body to the one target.

Wing Chun practitioners attack within this central area to transmit force more effectively, since it targets the “core center” (or “mother line”, another center defined in some lineages and referring to the vertical axis of the human body where the center of gravity lies). For example, striking an opponent’s shoulder will twist the body, dispelling some of the force and weakening the strike, as well as compromising the striker’s position. Striking closer to the center transmits more force directly into the body.

Anyone interested in my old Centerlines? they were originally 4x100, but they were redrilled to 4x114.3 by one of the previous owners. They also require shank style lug nuts which i will provide. The wheel closest in the picture has some pretty mean curb rash from its past life on drift cars. But it holds air just fine, and all the wheels are balanced. 

Tires are 195/50/15 Toyo Proxes4 with lots of life left. 2 of them have some wear on the sidewalls from rubbing the fender. 

Size is 15x9 offset is around -25.

Wheels are located in the San Francisco Bay Area. will not ship.

Price is $700obo