breastfeeding awareness

There should be a law against stupidity. / Breastfeeding Awareness Month.

Apparently, August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month.

That’s fine. Totally cool. I mean - we’ve got national Pie Day and probably a bunch of other useless awareness months more. Don’t get me wrong: every day should be national pie day.

Anyway. Let’s dig out some old news and ask ourselves: "Is it really legal to walk around with an IQ less than your shoe size?"

Because that’s exactly the kind of question that pops into my head when I think about Gisele Bündchen. She’s as stupid as she’s pretty, and boy she’s got killer looks.

A while ago she said: "There should be a worldwide law, in my opinion, that mothers should breastfeed their babies."

Yes. Breastfeeding is definitely the best option for your baby. But this brainless, narcissistic walking stick forgot a few things in her senseless statement: Not every woman is physically able to breastfeed their baby. Not every woman wants to breastfeed their baby.

Seriously. A law that mothers should breastfeed their babies? A LAW?! So - if I can’t breastfeed I’m a terrible mother and deserve to be punished? Thank god that this woman is in no position to make/change any laws.

Gisele Bündchen: “Some people think they don’t have to breastfeed. I think: ‘Are you going to give chemical food to your child, when they are so little?’ ”

I’m not really sure what kind of chemicals this woman is talking about, but I’m pretty damn certain I didn’t feed my baby any life-threatening formula.

About me:

Why did I choose formula over breastfeeding?
-My body took that decision from me. Some myth says: the bigger your boobs, the more milk you’ll produce. I call bullshit. From breastmilk alone, my daughter would’ve starved within less than 2 days. I had to give my baby formula.

Would I judge people if they denied breastfeeding from the beginning?
-I never judge people. Unless they’re idiotic enough to believe that they have any damn right to tell people what to do. In my birthing class was a mommy-to-be and her nipples were always sensitive and sore to the point where she cried. She was scared of having to breastfeed her baby. Why? Because she knew it would hurt her. Breastfeeding is supposed to build a special connection between a mother and her baby. Pain and being uncomfortable is the wrong way to achieve that. My own daughter and I still have a very special bond - because love’s the magic key and not if you shove a silicon nipple or a human nipple into the baby’s hungry mouth. Other than that: my kid’s pretty damn healthy for a formula-baby. Well… must be the chemicals, she’s probably a genetic superfreak now. I’ll let everyone know when she starts crawling up walls with her bare hands.

A 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) report found that infant formula prepared in accordance with applicable Codex Alimentarius standards was a safe complementary food and a suitable breast milk substitute.

The U.S. Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) defines infant formula as “a food which purports to be or is represented for special dietary use solely as a food for infants by reason of its simulation of human milk or its suitability as a complete or partial substitute for human milk”.

We love our children and we only want what’s best for them. But also: as a mother you get to decide what’s best for your child. And for my child it was best to be fed formula.

Every mother has the right to decide how, what and where she’s feeding her babies.

On the same note: Breastfeeding and/or bottle-feeding in public? I want to smack everyone who looks down at a mother in disgust because she’s got to get her tatas out to feed her baby. It’s the most normal and natural thing in the world. I guess some people have simply forgotten that breats are not only objects of sexual desire.

YAY FOR BREASTFEEDING AWARENESS!

YAY FOR FORMULA SO BABIES DON’T HAVE TO STARVE!

NAY FOR IDIOTS!

Hey breastfeeding moms/advocates: my local gym (owned and run by the city, so it’s a part of the local government) recently put up a new sign in the women’s locker room. I should have taken a picture, but the paraphrased version is this:

To keep other people from being uncomfortable, we invite breastfeeding moms to use our designated breastfeeding area or use a nursing cover.

I believe the “designated breastfeeding area” is the child care room, which, while comfortable and friendly, is usually crowded, noisy, and located at a fairly inconvenient spot.

This sign makes me mad every time I see it, and if there are legal protections for breastfeeding that they’re violating, I’d love to point this out and see if I can get them to take it down.

Any advice?

Edited to add: My state has a law on the books stating that “Mothers have the right to breastfeed anywhere they have a right to be.” What I don’t know is if a business (or in this case, local government) has a right to ask them to cover up.

Milk for Thought: Latch On America!

A couple months ago a friend of mine sent me a link on Facebook to the Milk for Thought website.  I skimmed through the page linked to me, which was a request form for this giant pink bus to visit your town…all in the name of breastfeeding awareness.  I was vaguely intrigued, but kind of forgot about it to be honest!  Then two days ago I went up to Chapel Hill to Women’s Birth and Wellness Center for a quick checkup…and there on the bulletin board was a picture of the pink bus with the words “Latch On America!”.  I was surprised and excited to see the organization had chosen Chapel Hill as a stop on their summer long roadtrip around the USA…and I happened to be up there on the very day of the event!

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So what’s Latch on America all about?  In 45 days this team of breastfeeding advocates will travel to 30 cities, with one goal: to promote breastfeeding on all levels of society by raising awareness about the Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding.  As they visit each city they encourage local organizations that support breastfeeding moms (i.e. La Leche League, lactation consultants, etc.) to show up to the event so moms who stop by can see the wealth of resources available in their own community to support them.   

But that’s not all!  At these events the Milk for Thought team is using their own video crew to record the stories of real moms’ experiences with breastfeeding, in the hopes of compiling all these stories into a documentary to raise even greater awareness for breastfeeding.  I could go on, but I strongly encourage you to check out the website for yourself to read all about it! 

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While at the event on Thursday I was able to speak to the founder of Milk for Thought, Ryan Comfort.  I’ll admit I was a little surprised to see a guy behind this whole venture!  But as I spoke to him and other members of his team I really was impressed with their knowledge and passion for what they are doing. 

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In fact, it inspired me to do a lot more research on Milk for Thought, and I can now say with certainty that I’m proud of what Ryan has created and accomplished so far (and completely in awe of the fact we’re the same age…dang!) and excited to see what lies ahead for this budding organization. 

One thing I promised Ryan I would do after speaking to him was help spread the word about what they are doing this summer.  As he said himself, they have already gotten much attention on major news networks, and have even had the opportunity to sit down with the Surgeon General…but so many more people could be impacted by the documentary they are compiling.  It’s the stories of moms struggling to balance work and pumping breastmilk, or the mom who donated thousands of ounces of her milk after losing her own baby, or the moms who found empowerment through unashamedly breastfeeding in public, that will show this country that our culture needs to change, our healthcare system needs to change so that families get the support and information they need to feed their babies in the most natural way possible. 

(Read more stories here, and view some of the interviews Ryan’s team has done with real moms here)

So…that’s a lot of information to take in, but one last thing!  If you would all click here to view Milk for Thought’s Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for their documentary.  The goal is to raise $210,000 by September 19th.  If this goal is not reached, they will not be able to make the documentary.  I really believe in this and am already committed to pledging what we can to help this endeavor.  Even if you can give as little as $1.00 it would help! 

Here’s a short clip to give you an idea of what a powerful impact a full documentary could be:

So there you have it folks….click on that link above and give $5 or $10 or however much you have to get this ball rolling! 

Images courtesy of Milk for Thought’s Facebook page.

The words that will keep you breastfeeding one more day

by Melissa Byers posted in Mom Stories Before my oldest was born, I was committed to nursing. I took the class and bought the Boppy pillow. I read books and talked with moms in BabyCenter’s community. I felt well prepared. When that baby was born, I got her right on my breast and had thought,… Read more »

Want to get the full story? Click on the headline above. And thanks for reading the BabyCenter Blog.

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I am 100000% for breastfeeding in public. I mean, think about it, would you eat in a bathroom? Everyone seems to think that babies are the same as adults, so why should they be subject to eating in private, if adults can eat in public? And to the mothers who think women must breastfeed in private, did you just not leave your house when you were taking care of your child as an infant? Or were you truly okay with your baby, who could easily acquire disease, eating in one of the dirtiest places we know? Just something to think about.