booklands

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I, um. I don’t even know what to say. 

It’s so .. perfect. And it’s so rare! Oh my god. I know it’s a little worse for wear, but I know this book & he must’ve spent … That aside, I can’t even believe he FOUND this. I’d mentioned months and months ago, offhandedly at a bookshop when we were trying to figure out what book to do next before Crime & Punishment ever started (before I met any of you, even!), that I used to read this old book my local library at home must’ve thrown out at some point about a journey through a land of books. Kinda like what the experiment would be. 

I. Wow.

Bookland: тайная жизнь книг #2

Те, кто читал книгу Ренсома Риггза “Дом странных детей”, то те, наверное, помнят чудесную девочку Оливию, которая умела левитировать. Вот так в один пасмурный денек мы с Оливией внесли в реальную жизнь кусочек чего-то необычного и паранормального :)

“Insurgente” é derrubado por “Cinderela” e pela animação “Cada Um na Sua Casa”

A versão live-action da clássica animação da Disney, Cinderela, estreou com força nos cinemas brasileiros, já faturou R$ 11,6 milhões do dia 26 a 29 de março, tirando a continuação de Divergente do topo das bilheterias.

Confira a notícia completa aqui

adventures-in-bookland asked:

OKAY, LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT MY CRUSH (the crushing is mutual). He's 19 (I'm 20), he's an actual giant, like 6'5. he is bi racial so he's got darker skin, he has the most gorgeous green eyes I've ever seen. I've never met anyone who is such a nerd, but he's also a jock??? like he played football and soccer in HS. We talk for hours on Skype and texting. No other guy I've ever liked before has been this great before, and I' probably gonna end up falling for him.

awww you guys sound cute 

join our sleepover :)

#BookTag – 25 Domande sui libri

#BookTag – 25 Domande sui libri

Mi piace moltissimo leggere le interviste ai blogger, soprattutto quando si parla di libri per capire se ci sono altri malati appassionati come me in giro e, beh, questo tag è davvero carino!

Le domande sono parecchie ma prometto di essere sintetica, ma prima di tutto ringrazio Airals di Airals Books – Welcome to my Bookland per avermi taggata e Racconti dal passato per aver creato questo tag s…

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Today I’m now a little over 100 pages into Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, and it looks like some of the characters’ lives are starting to change and intertwine. I can see some very specific geometrical relationshapes (I’m not sure if I should groan or celebrate that word creation) forming, and they’re nervous-making but also exciting. I’m a huge fan of the dialogue. Currently trying to figure out if I should be more annoyed with Wren than I am.

So far the book has had a couple of effects on me. First, it’s made me reminisce for The Gilmore Girls, season four specifically. Second, it’s made me wonder about the existence of Harry Potter within Cath and Wren’s world. There’s only been one mention of HP so far (again, I’m only barely past 100 pages), and maybe it wouldn’t have stuck out to me if I hadn’t already thought about whether something that is so obviously the inspiration for Simon and Baz’s world could exist in this novel.

Lev Grossman's The Magicians was one of the reasons I wondered about this before I’d ever even opened Fangirl. Grossman’s book is a loving homage that exists within its own skin, but utilizes the bones of C.S. Lewis’s Narnia tales, and Grossman stated in a few interviews that he was positive the characters in Harry Potter would’ve read sci-fi or fantasy fiction, so to have his own characters mention Harry Potter - as they were enrolled in their own, really-real school for magic - seemed perfectly normal. Mentioning C.S. Lewis or Narnia, however, would go too far and pierce the fragile bubble of imagination he was creating; so in the world of Lev Grossman's The Magicians there is no C.S. Lewis or Narnia.

Not that the existence of Harry Potter within the world of Cath and Wren - and Simon and Baz - renders Fangirl unbelievable. Just something I wondered about, and definitely something I’m curious about. Not too curious, though. I’d much rather think about what point/edge of that geometrical relationshape Cath is going to move along.

Onward with the reading.

Zadie Smith's 10 Rules of Writing

  1. When still a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing this than anything else.
  2. When an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it, or even better, as an enemy would.
  3. Don’t romanticise your ‘vocation’. You can either write good sentences or you can’t. There is no ‘writer’s lifestyle’. All that matters is what you leave on the page.
  4. Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without telling yourself that the things you can’t do aren’t worth doing. Don’t mask self-doubt with contempt.
  5. Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.
  6. Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. The presence of a crowd won’t make your writing any better than it is.
  7. Work on a computer that is disconnected from the ­internet.
  8. Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.
  9. Don’t confuse honours with achievement.
  10. Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand — but tell it. Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.