6

Well, whatever happened with Mako, I’m glad it hasn’t come between us. I’ve never had a girlfriend to hang out with and talk to before.

5

Can we talk about something? The way Bryke used the past vilians to taunt Korra with her insecurities and inadequacies. You get a quick look into her mind as she suffers through the venom. It would probably explain why she was so depressed in the finale. Can you imagine, having to experience all of that for probably…maybe an hour? 

2

There was this one scene that was incredibly heartbreaking to me. In the finale, Bryke includes one small shot of a terribly, beaten up Tenzin turning around to look at the wreckage of the Air Temple.

Everyone talks about Korra’s broken spirit, but at this moment, it is apparent that Tenzin’s spirit is broken as well. All his life he was taught to believe that he was the sole predecessor to his father’s culture and legacy.  

During the season, he gained hope. He believed that he was finally rebuilding the Air Nation again. All he wanted to do was make his father proud.

But, this scene…when the castle falls apart in front of his eyes, you can just see the shame in his eyes, and the despair in his frown. He probably felt that he had failed his father. 

4

This was painful. Like, really sad. And the consequences will be interesting. I knew Korra would have some sort of major event occur in her life that would cause her to become debilitated and incapable of performing her duties, so this was definitely in line with that, but it was still hard to watch. Also, instead of the death of someone close to her, which is what I thought would happen, we get something that physically debilitates her—which in some ways, is almost better, as it removes her power and agency in a much more real, visceral way. And for Korra, someone to whom power and energy and choice means everything, being stuck in a wheelchair is a pretty horrifying thing. I’m really interested to see where this goes, and how Korra learns her final lessons: Learning how to look to others for help, and learning to get back up again even when hope is nothing but a bitter memory. 

After this finale, I think I figured out what the thematic endgame of the series is — Korra’s going to teach the world to keep balance whether the Avatar is around or not.

As awful as Korra’s current situation is, I feel like it’s going to be something that she will end up learning from. And, if you consider her hallucinations — which suggest that obsolescence is her greatest fear — and the way those fears will inevitably interact with her extended convalescence (since she’ll have to watch as other people take over the job that should have been hers… or, worse, as a situation she could have handled with ease turns toxic without her around), it’s easy to see how the major takeaway could be that the Avatar can’t be the only force for balance anymore.

It’s easy to imagine that this will be Korra’s legend — she’ll be the Avatar who taught the world to take care of itself without an Avatar. And, considering what happened to the world due to Roku’s inaction and Aang’s hibernation, it’ll probably be the best legacy she could possibly leave.

If the show decides to go the “Red Lotus tried to kidnap Korra because they had a different idea of how the Avatar should be raised” route, I can’t imagine a more powerful line to introduce that side of them than this:

"We have something in common, Avatar.  You and I were both imprisoned by the White Lotus for the same crime.  They just gave you a nicer cage."

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