Welcome to Passive, New York

As Andy Henriquez, a 19 year old from Washington Heights lay in his cell dying from a tear in his aorta, an artery that supplies blood to the heart, he asked a guard if he could call his mother just to say goodbye. For days he suffered in pain barely able to breathe as the blood made its way down to his groin. He request was denied. His fellow inmates knew something was wrong. They screamed and kicked doors in a failed bid to get Andy some help.

A doctor who visited him earlier that day prescribed him hand cream and wrote the prescription in the wrong name.

Hours later he was found dead on the floor of his cell.

This happened in April of last year, New Yorkers are just hearing about it today because a suit has been filed by the lawyer of Mr. Henriquez’s family.

In this last year I have been thinking about some things….

I have thought about the death of Eric Garner and the muted outrage that followed.

I have thought about all the black men who were set up by Detective Louis Scarcella from Brooklyn, who have languished in jail for years and are just now having their cases reviewed after it was discovered Scarcella was crooked and the silence that followed.

I have thought about how everyone just accepts that Stop and Frisk is a thing of the past and that the rights of black and brown men here in New York City are not still being violated.

I have thought about how slick it was for our Mayor to parade his black family in front of the cameras to get elected and how New Yorkers have yet to check him for basically being Bloomberg 2.0.

I have thought about those who live in the projects whose stewards, NYCHA, last year said they had a surplus of money to fix them and are now saying this year they have no money.

I have thought about how “affordable housing” here means you must make damn near 100k, yet no one seems to believe that this city hates its poor.

I have thought about the fact that this city has the highest rates of workplace discrimination lawsuits in the country, yet no one wants to address racism in the workplace.

I have thought about how gentrification of this city has made many neighborhoods I once loved and enjoyed unrecognizable and in my view turned its residents into the quietest, softest, most passive lot of New Yorkers I have ever experienced in my lifetime here.

Who the fuck are you people?

There will be very little outrage over Mr. Henriquez’s death. This lot of New Yorkers would be more outraged if you kicked a cat than if you choked a young black man to death or allowed one to internally bleed to death on the floor of a jail cell.

Ersula Ore. Eric Garner. Jahmil-El Cuffee. Rosan Miller. Marlene Pinnock. Al Flowers. Alonzo Grant. This is just a sample of the men and women who have been savagely, and unnecessarily, beaten by police officers this summer. Garner’s case, in which an NYPD officer used a chokehold to restrain the 43-year-old Staten Island father, resulted in death (On Friday a medical examiner ruled Garner’s death a homicide at the hands of the NYPD). Since then, the topic of “police brutality” has gained momentum nationwide and has sparked outcry from elected officials and community members asking for police reform. Just last week, in a meeting at New York City Hall, Rev. Al Sharpton told Mayor Bill De Blasio of his biracial son: “If Dante wasn’t your son, he’d be a candidate for a chokehold.” And it’s true. But why? How, in Obama’s America, did we end up here?

The following comment added by a regular Gawker reader is of note:

Nothing involving black Americans is a national crisis unless it’s something that makes white people feel threatened, like mass protests against inequality. National crises involve citizens. And most white Americans don’t really view black Americans as full, legitimate citizens. They are an other. Also, the truth is, police brutality makes whites feel safe. Our culture paints blacks as inevitable criminal threats and police brutality makes whites feel as if those threats are being kept in line.

Today, 66 year old Professor Patricia Ward was murdered by her son, Derek Ward, he then jumped in front of a train killing himself. Early details on the murder-suicide were unclear and names went unreleased until this afternoon. Social media lit up with comments, many fueled with Islamophobic rants due to the news outlets use of the word “beheading,” and people’s bigotry. FYI everyone he is not Muslim.

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This type of hatred is exactly why people in my family can’t go out in public without getting harassed. These bigots like to act like they are so civilized while they dehumanize a whole group of people. 

Anon asks:

ANON. How do you let go of long time toxic friends or family? “Just a preference. You’re offended cause you’re black.” “Tr*****s are delusional.” “Abortion is murder. Should’ve used the morning pill to not get pregnant after the rape”. I’m so done.

First of all, it’s a big step to decide that someone’s views or presence in your life to too toxic to allow, so you should be proud of that choice and give yourself some compassion and care for making such a painful decision.

In terms of how to do it, maybe it’s cowardly but I’m a fan of the fade-away.  If it’s someone you don’t interact with regularly and mostly see sharing their views on Facebook, I think deleting them quietly is a valid option.  You don’t need to give them a reason, just fade away.  Unless you wanna go out with one big hurrah and call them out before deleting, which is also a fine way to go about it.

If it’s someone you see around minimally, maybe in your social circle, you can stop reaching out or scheduling plans with them and only attend get-togethers with your social group if they are unlikely to be there.  If it’s an actual close friend, the fade away is also possible, but you might have to be more up front (which is ultimately a good thing since they are getting feedback) about your reasoning.  I’d say stop reaching out, stop making plans, and when they contact you and ask why, let them know their bigotry (be specific though, name the specific kind of -ism they engage in rather than just call them a straight up bigot which is pretty broad) makes you so uncomfortable that you need to take a break, and if they are willing to educate themselves and change, you can reconsider.
For family members, that’s harder, but you can do your best to reduce your interactions with them to the bare minimum and don’t spend your social time with them, just see them when it’s required and then once you’re independent and living on your own, grant your time and presence to those who you know will make you feel safe and comfortable and who deserve your friendship. 

Whatever you do and however hard it is, remember that your safety and health (that includes mental health) come first and that you need to take care of you.  You don’t need to prioritize anyone’s feelings or ego over your own ability to exist in this world comfortably and with as much ease as possible.  You deserve to fill your time and space with people who contribute positively to your life, not the opposite.  Being friends with a bigot costs a TON of mental energy and it is 100% your right to decide that you can’t keep expending that energy on someone who is unwilling to learn, change, respect you or explore your side of those basic issues.

Hope this helps.

d00medy0uth asked:

You do realize that there are other female characters that can suit the love interest of Thor...if they killed her character off there are plenty other women characters to be brought to life in the mcu. Please stop throwing your beliefs on everything, especially something so stupid. It's a fictional character.

Wow you’ve literally just stated that female characters are interchangeable to you. So killing her off means other women can have a go at Thor. Because obviously the ONLY way a woman can be fully fleshed out in the MCU is to be a love interest. Like next time try to hide your misogyny better. 

Like I’ve actually tried diving into the comics and I can see how different Thor storylines have ended up and you know what? She doesn’t die in most of the different versions of Thor. This Jane Foster the MCU version is fucking amazing (they are all p great but she’s the first one I met), she’s a brilliant astrophysicist and she’s not just his love interest. She’s not replaceable and when she’s gone she doesn’t have to die to be written out of his story.

Like I haven’t seen fanboys talk about minutiae like whether or not they’ve gotten costumes right in the latest films and spending hours speculating on whether or not they should have tried harder to achieve the comic book costume. But you know killing off an important character from a popular film franchise is somehow the stupid bit.  Its not like fans haven’t also revealed their racism by being angry with casting Michael B Jordan as Johnny Storm.  Your opinions aren’t magically devoid of bigotry, statements on one’s opinions of fictional characters can reveal issues of internalization (read through the lines you’ve revealed your misogyny in several ways).  

I don’t understand why we’re talking about this. The prof just doesn’t understand how it is today because she’s from a different generation. I mean, we have Obama, right? And Beyonce! Listen, I have black friend, and her parents are dentists. So I don’t understand why we’re still talking about racism.
—  White Second Year Education Student, York University, in a lecture in an education class on race and racism (she said this in response to a black student describing a racist incident they experienced)

So… Barry Spurr (a poetry professor at Sydney Uni who made racist comments about Indigenous peoples in an email exchange and one of the national school curriculum review experts) has been suspended. Yep, not sacked, but suspended “while the matter is investigated”… This is simply not good enough. I’m sick and tired of bigots getting soft punishments. Read more here

anonymous asked:

Why is social Darwinism a bad thing exactly?

Because it is entirely based around justifying existing power structures, AKA women make less money than men, this has nothing to do with the historic oppression of women but rather due to some a priori law of nature.

It’s an attempt to refigure society along the lines present before the French Revolution—that is, that existing power structures aren’t justified via some secular dynamic (which can be challenged) but rather by some otherworldly force.  This is why it was such a great cover for bigotry in the 19th century (and why contemporary bigots have tried to revive it though it’s way more obvious now)

Mod R