Have a few minutes to spare? I just found out that the Smithsonian is now accepting public help for entering label information for their bumble bee collection. This data will then be put into a database and be readily available to interested researchers! This kind of historical data is really important for studies examining the change in insect populations over time and examining when certain species become rare.

I’ve done a few so far, and the work is pretty easy. Even doing one or two to kill some time will help contribute to science.

9

Artfully Artless Craft’s 4th Giveaway!

Because I love you guys <3

Rules - PLEASE READ

  • Must be following me - Uponsorrowfuleyes
  • Only reblogs count! Every reblog gets you an entry. Reblog as many times as you want! 
  • No giveaway or inactive blogs. I will check!
  • This giveaway ships internationally
  • Winner will be picked October 5, 2014

What you get:

  • One hand crafted glass eye brooch
  • One knotted goldstone keychain
  • One knotted moonstone keychain
  • Various stones including peacock ore, and rainbow mystic aura quartz
  • One vial full of cruelty free honey bees (donated by local beekeepers after they’ve passed)
  • Four real butterfly wings
  • Four drilled elytra beetle wings
  • Two sea shells
  • One ammonite
  • Two coyote teeth
  • One mink jaw
  • One porcupine quill
  • Numerous hedgehog spines
  • One coyote claw
  • One turtle claw
  • One alligator scale
  • Two gilded bone necklaces
  • One mystic aura quartz trio necklace
  • One autumn honey bey necklace
  • One resin encased crab claw

Good Luck!

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Bacteria from bees possible alternative to antibiotics

Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. So what is the key to its’ antimicrobial properties? Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a unique group of 13 lactic acid bacteria found in fresh honey, from the honey stomach of bees. The bacteria produce a myriad of active antimicrobial compounds.

These lactic acid bacteria have now been tested on severe human wound pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), among others. When the lactic acid bacteria were applied to the pathogens in the laboratory, it counteracted all of them.

Tobias C Olofsson, Èile Butler, Pawel Markowicz, Christina Lindholm, Lennart Larsson, Alejandra Vásquez. Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey’s antimicrobial and therapeutic activities. International Wound Journal, 2014; DOI: 10.1111/iwj.12345

Working bees on honey cells (stock image). Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. Credit: © Dmytro Smaglov / Fotolia

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