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Please help the garment workers in Bangladesh. The Global North is wreaking havoc on the Global South in the name of globalization, and the victims, largely, are the women of the Global South, women who need money.  If these women don’t migrate to the Global North (the first world) for domestic work, or if they aren’t forced out through trafficking schemes, they’re largely stuck working in free trade zones or sweatshops. They’re stuck in deplorable conditions. They’re being paid starvation wages. They’re beaten when they don’t meet absurd production targets. They’re hired young and fired young. They’re, on average, paid 11 cents an hour. They work 14-20 hours a day, seven days a week, with an average of two days off a month. Often their wages are withheld for no reason. They sleep between shifts, curling up next to their sewing machines. The air is contaminated, the bathrooms unsanitary. There’s little to no ventilation in these factories, and they often set on fire. With no safety exits, women perish. 

This isn’t just happening in Bangladesh. This is happening worldwide. Your beloved Disney contracts factories like that of the Shah Makhdum factory in Bangladesh. Walmart. Gap. Old Navy. Sears. Corporations of the Global North are robbing the Global South and then exploiting them as labor sources.

What can you do? You can be aware. You can pressure companies to improve conditions. You are a consumer, you have the power. But don’t pressure these companies to pull out, as this will leave these women with no source of income. Pressure them to improve conditions. Threaten to boycott if they do not. If they claim they have, ask for proof, ask for follow up, ask to see the funds. Make sure the women working at these factories are making more than starvation wages, for when they do, they can afford medicine, rent, water, food. They can move on from their factory jobs.

Please help. Please watch this documentary,”The Hudden Face of Globalization”  x, by the Institute for Global Labour and Human Rights. Visit their website, familiarize yourself,

Research the factory collapses, the factory fires, the human rights atrocities. Please remember to also research corporations inaction when regarding these tragedies. 

Support the Bangladesh Center for Worker Solidarity.  Donate.

Visit the Alliance for Bangladesh Worker Safety’s website.

Remember this is worldwide. Remember you have the power. Remember these women.

Bangladesh’s Central Bank has said that it would jail anyone caught using Bitcoin or cryptocurrencies, under the country’s anti-money laundering laws. The Bangladesh Bank regulates all the commercial banks and the banking industry in Bangladesh. The announcement came as a surprise, as there was no warning or other material events leading to this move. Bangladesh …read more

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Hi guys, I felt like I should really share this experience with you. Recently I decided to conduct something of a…social experiment.

The first photo is of me in casual wear. It’s pretty mismatched. I was wearing my pajama top over my tee and had black pants on. My hairs messed up and everything. I look unprofessional, and it’s intended.

I took a walk through an inner city neighbourhood of Brisbane. I asked the police for directions to the library. I bought a krispy kreme doughnut from the 7 11. I went inside the mall and was asked to try free samples several times. I bought the first volume from SnK from Angus and Robert’s. I wasn’t treated any differently, the reactions were warm and friendly. My outfit didn’t effect anything at all.

The second image is me in a salwaar. The hair took effort to get into curls. (Sorry, the mirror was foggy) I had a bit of make up on. I looked good. The outfit was ironed and it looked much better than the previous one. I went to the same shops an hour later. Asked the same guard where the library was. Bought another krispy kreme.

The reactions were totally different. There were no thank you’s. No one asked me to try a sample. The guard was annoyed. When I went into the bookstore the lady at the register followed me around the whole time. When I bought a copy of ‘The storyteller’ by Jodi Picoult, she asked me if I had enough money with me before she scanned it.

I am a fourteen year old girl who has lived overseas for three years. Never have I faced such blatant discrimination.

What is this supposed to mean? You’re good to go as long as you don’t embrace your traditional values? Is this why south Asian girls are embarrassed to wear their saris and salwaars in the open? Is this why we refuse to wear our bindi and play the harmonium? Is this why we think it’s better to be well spoken in English that Bangla, Urdu, or Hindi.

When white people embrace my traditional values, they’re open minded. When I do it, I’m suddenly a nuisance. I’m automatically expected to not be well spoken. I’m automatically a suspect for shop lifting.

Think about that.

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Bangladesh (গণপ্রজাতন্ত্রী বাংলাদেশ )

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Bengali Wedding

Bengali’s wedding tradition is a long story. From the very begining we come to know our tradition we saw a strict and joyfull tradition in our wedding ceremony. Where bride and groom come seperately from their home to the venue. Then with due respect on religion a well pious man read the wedding agreement and both bride and groom have to sign on the paper. This happens same for all the other religion/region weddings. But whats the difference for Bengali?

Well, Bengali girls grow on their fathers home with their family. And from childhood they are taught one day they have to leave their known family to a unknown family i.e Grooms home. A Bengali girl always have some dream about unknown Groom’s home. How it will be? They don’t know.

Aminul Islam

A Greek court’s decision to acquit local farmers who admitted shooting 28 Bangladeshi strawberry pickers when they dared to ask for months of back pay has sparked outrage in the country.

Politicians, unionists and anti-racist groups roundly condemned the verdict describing it as a black mark for justice in a case that had shone a light on the appalling conditions in which migrant workers are often kept in Greece.

"I feel shame as a Greek," said the victim’s lawyer, Moisis Karabeyidis, after the tribunal in the western port city of Patras, delivered the shock ruling. "This decision is an outrage and a disgrace … the court showed an appalling attitude toward the victims."

Scores of migrants, many sobbing in disbelief, protested outside the court house after magistrates allowed two of the men, including the owner of the farm who had been accused of human trafficking, to walk free.

Two others, accused of aggravated assault and illegal firearms possession, were handed prison sentences of 14 years and seven months and eight years and seven months but were also freed pending appeal.

The Bangladeshis were shot at in April last year when they demanded to be remunerated for six months of unpaid work at a farm in Manolada in the southern Peloponnese. Four of the strawberry pickers were badly injured in the attack.

At a time of unrivalled crisis in Greece, where living standards have deteriorated dramatically after six straight years of recession, the case had triggered widespread indignation.

Media investigations showed the migrants to be working in subhuman conditions without access to proper hygiene or basic sanitation.

Politicians who took up the cause also weighed in on Wednesday saying the verdict sent set an unwelcome example for other employers to follow.

"It sends the message that a foreign worker can die like a dog in the orchard," said Vassiliki Katrivanou, an MP with the main opposition radical-left Syriza party. She added that in a nation where fruit-farm labourers are frequently from overseas, the attack in Manolada was far from being an isolated incident.

"It leaves room for new victims by closing eyes to the brutal, inhuman and racist character of the exploitation suffered by workers on the land," she said, pointing out that the ruling had been made on World Day against Trafficking in Persons.

The Greek farmers had instructed top criminal lawyers to defend them in a court drama that lasted for over a month. More than 40 prosecution witnesses testified in a case in which the prosecutor had asked that exemplary punishment be made.

Denouncing the judgment as scandalous, anti-racism organisations said it raised questions about the impartiality of the Greek justice system and vowed to step up protest action against the decision.

"We call upon unions and human rights movements to react against this unprecedented racist scandal," said Petros Constantinou, coordinator of the Movement Against Racism and the Fascist Threat in a statement. "The hundreds of millions of profit made in the strawberry industry cannot come about by shooting labourers in strawberry fields."

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