australian-national-maritime-museum

Seaman with a cat and kitten, c 1910 by Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons on Flickr.

This photo is part of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s Samuel J. Hood Studio collection. Sam Hood (1872-1953) was a Sydney photographer with a passion for ships. His 60-year career spanned the romantic age of sail and two world wars. The photos in the collection were taken mainly in Sydney and Newcastle during the first half of the 20th century.

Other great photos by Sam Hood here.

It’s a bit pre-this blog’s era as the exhibition covers the period up to the mid-19th century, but those of you in Sydney should pop down to the National Maritime Museum to catch our East of India exhibition about the origins of the East India Company and early Australian trade and relations with India. As this photo suggests, textile art and costume play a significant role in the exhibition. Here’s a good review, highlighting some of the interesting stories the exhibition explores.

view north from HMAS Vampire, Australian National Maritime Museum, Darling Harbour, Sydney
7/11/2014

Cats on an old shelter by Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons on Flickr:

This photograph is part of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s collection of nitrate negatives taken by Harold Nossiter and his son Harold Nossiter Junior in the 1920s and 1930s.

Harold Nossiter (senior) was a noted Sydney sailor in the 1920s and 1930s who became the first Australian to skipper a yacht around the world under an Australian flag.

This photograph is believed to have been taken during a cruise to Broughton Island on Harold Nossiter’s yacht UTIEKAH II in 1930.

Australian National Maritime Museum: Week 199

For when you need to do field research- Australian National Maritime Museum: Week 199

Barret and I have been working on a graphic novel together and when I decided a few chapters would take place on a ship, I realized that I don’t know very much at all about life at sea. It also didn’t help that the kind of visual information I needed was very specific and very elusive.

At Barret’s suggestion I made a research appointment at the library of the Australian National Maritime Museum…

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