Important PSA about asthma

So the other day I saw a post going around with ‘cute fic ideas’, on that list included something along the lines of person A having an asthma attack but not their rescue medication so person B calming them down out of the attack.

THAT IS NOT HOW ASTHMA WORKS. YOU CAN KILL OR SERIOUSLY INJURE SOMEONE WITH ASTHMA IF THEY’RE HAVING A BAD ENOUGH ATTACK AND YOU TRY TO ‘CALM THEM DOWN’ INSTEAD OF GETTING THEM PROPER CARE.

Here is what you actually need to do if someone you know is suffering from an asthma attack and they either don’t have their rescue medication or their rescue medication didn’t help the attack:

  • First things first you need to calm down and assess the situation. Either way, you’re going to have to be making a nice little trip to the ER so determine if the attack is moderate or severe. If it’s moderate, you can drive them, if it’s severe or they are unresponsive, call 911 IMMEDIATELY and have an ambulance bring them so they can get proper oxygen and medication en route to the hospital. You’re going to need to tell the operator that they do not have any rescue medication, and have not been given any (of if they have that medication was administered at x time and has had no effect. The operator should give you a run through of what to do from that point onward).  
  • If it’s a moderate attack, ask them if there’s any place they might have a backup inhaler (purse, bag, backpack, cupboard, under the sink etc), however don’t waste time on this, if they don’t know just get them in the car and GET THEM THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL TREATMENT THEY NEED. THEIR LUNGS ARE NOT FUNCTIONING PROPERLY. THEY NEED MEDICAL ATTENTION IF THEY DO NOT HAVE THEIR RESCUE INHALER OR IF IT IS NOT WORKING.
  • Now here is only part about calming them down. Most people with asthma have dealt with it before, so they know to stay calm as possible during an attack. However, it is hard to stay calm if the person trying to help you is freaking out about it and causing a scene, so I state again, you, the person helping, need to stay calm. I don’t care how bad it seems, freaking out accomplishes nothing. If it makes you feel better, play some calming classical music on the drive to the ER. If you have access to hot/ at least warm water give them a cup of it to sip on during the drive (if you don’t, that’s fine too, don’t waste time heating up water in a coffee pot or kettle THEY NEED MEDICAL ATTENTION.)
  • If the person having the attack goes into a panic attack, try to calm them down en route to the hospital the same way you’d calm a regular person having a panic attack down. If they’re so freaked out they don’t want to leave the house, it’s time to call the ambulance. Panicking can and will make asthma worse and it is very important they get prompt care for their asthma.
  • IF YOU ARE EVER IN DOUBT AND UNSURE ABOUT HOW BAD THE ASTHMA IS ERROR ON THE SIDE OF CAUTION AND CALL FOR AN AMBULANCE. IT’S BETTER YOU OVER REACT AND GET AN AMBULANCE INSTEAD OF THE PERSON STOPPING BREATHING HALF WAY TO THE HOSPITAL. ASTHMA IS VERY SERIOUS. TREAT IT AS SUCH.

Please take a second to reblog this; as someone who suffers from asthma that has landed me in the hospital quite a few times, it is very scary that there are people who think the treatment for asthma is to try and calm someone down instead of getting them proper medical attention.

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The biggest gang in NYC doing what they do best.

The New Jim Crow.

2

om the moment Los Angeles police handcuffed him, Jorge Azucena told officers he needed help.

"I can’t breathe, I can’t breathe," he pleaded. "I have asthma, I have asthma."

In the half-hour or so after his arrest late one night last September, Azucena said over and over that he was struggling for breath. Numerous LAPD officers and sergeants heard his pleas for medical attention but ignored them even as his condition visibly worsened.

"You can breathe just fine," one sergeant told him. "You can talk, so you can breathe."

Azucena could not walk or stand by the time officers brought him to a South Los Angeles police station for booking. So they carried him into a cell, leaving him lying face-down on the floor. He was soon unconscious. When paramedics arrived shortly after, Azucena’s heart had stopped.

The chilling account of how Azucena died is told in two reports made public this week. After a Times article last year on the circumstances surrounding Azucena’s death, the reports offer new details into the man’s desperate and futile attempts to convince officers his lungs were succumbing to what coroner’s officials determined was most likely an asthma attack.

Nearly a year after Azucena’s death, LAPD officials have not yet determined whether any of the officers involved that night should be disciplined for failing to summon help and, in the case of some officers, for lying to investigators. Nine officers and two sergeants are the subjects of ongoing internal investigations, while another sergeant under scrutiny recently retired, said Capt. Paul Snell, who commands the LAPD’s Southwest Division, where the death occurred. As is customary, prosecutors from the county district attorney’s office are reviewing the case to determine whether the inaction amounts to criminal behavior.

"There should not be any question that when somebody in custody is heard to say ‘I cannot breathe,’ the officers should promptly call for an ambulance," said Robert Saltzman, a member of the Police Commission that oversees the LAPD.

Through a spokesman, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck declined to comment.

http://www.latimes.com/local/crime/la-me-lapd-custody-death-20140823-story.html#page=1

Sleeping on animal fur in the first three months of life might reduce the risk of asthma in later childhood a new study has found. The chance of having asthma at the age of 6 years was 79% lower in children who had slept on animal skin after birth compared with those who were not exposed to animal skin. The risk decreased to 41% by the age of 10.

Of note.

Guys, Wally is so important. He has what appears to be asthma; breathing difficulties that clear up in the fresh air of Verdanturf. He accomplishes many things, he grows as a character, and he is great representation for those with asthma. He’s a great character first and foremost and I can identify with his struggles and making sacrifices, like moving or getting rid of pets, in order to breathe and not be miserable.

I looked up to him as a kid because having asthma isn’t easy. Especially considering things like Jimmy Neutron being on TV at the time (Carl Wheezer is bad.) I mean here is a character that has asthma and IT ISN’T A PUNCHLINE! I am so sick of nerdy/geeky characters getting asthma attacks and pulling out that ol’ inhaler as a “look how loser and outcast this character is! Lululul!”

The night I discovered I had it, I was hunched over in a chair, unable to breathe enough to cry because I hurt so much. In the Pokemon world where walking and being physical is a necessity for a trainer, not to mention sudden happenstances and scares, I can imagine it being very difficult for asthmatics.

So Wally is important. Thank you, Pokemon, for an awesome character that a new generation of asthmatic kids can look up to and see a role model. You made an awesome character that is so much more than his illness!

Study sheds light on asthma and respiratory viruses

People with asthma often have a hard time dealing with respiratory viruses such as the flu or the common cold, and researchers have struggled to explain why.

In a new study that compared people with and without asthma, the answer is becoming clearer. The researchers found no difference in the key immune response to viruses in the lungs and breathing passages. The work, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggests that a fundamental antiviral defense mechanism is intact in asthma. This means that another aspect of the immune system must explain the difficulty people with asthma have when they encounter respiratory viruses.

Read more

Funding: This study was supported by grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (grant numbers AADCRC U19-AI070489 and U19-AI000000, U10-HL109257, and CTSA UL1 TR000448), and Roche Postdoctoral Fellowship awards.

Care about research like this? Sign on to our Thunderclap campaign (http://bit.ly/NIHthunderclap) to tell Congress to finish what it started and pass the FY 2015 Labor-HHS spending bill now to restore sequestration cuts so that the promise of National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored research can be realized.

Flavor of the Month: Cardamom

Cardamom is the third most expensive spice by weight, behind only saffron and vanilla.  But with a captivatingly complex flavor profile crammed into such a small package, there’s little mystery behind its steep price. While popular in foods and drinks, cardamom is equally admired in traditional medicine. Perhaps most interesting is its airway relaxant potential in the treatment of asthma. Read more…

Photo Credit: Robin (FotoosVanRobin/Flicker)

If you ever tell me that asthmatics are just “faking it to get out of gym class” or some other shit I will slit your fucking throat bc one of my friends is currently in the hospital because of asthma and I’ve been put in the hospital bc I couldn’t breathe so don’t you ever say asthma isn’t that bad

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