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agentharrisonofshield answered your question “Give me super soldiers on the autistic spectrum. Give me sensory…”

Do Aspie SHIELD agents work for you? Aspie agents with 103 coping mechanisms because the middle of a violent mission is no time to meltdown?

R&D coming up with the BEST stim toys. Stuff that can assist aspie/autistic field agents. The psychologists SHIELD hires works /with/ the autistic agents to help them. Handlers working with the agents on that level too.

PTSD being prevalent in SHIELD as well. SHIELD working on being neurodivergent positive.

I recently came across this book. 
It is a book about the struggles of a family, a dad, with two children who have autism.

I am absolutely disgusted by it. By the title, the content and by the summary given. 

I’m autistic myself, aspergers, and yes, there are struggles and yes, it’s really hard sometimes. But for a person, a dad, to make this book with a title like that? It’s just disgusting. 
And I think (hope) that everyone, not even just the autism community, would gladly see this book off the racks.

It now has a 2.5 star rating. Which means, that if you search on average costumer review, in the catogory autism & aspergers, this book will pop up pretty fast.
I myself (and hopefully lots of other people who come across this book) am fortunately good in handling bad talking about autism, but I’d hate for an insecure 11 year old who happens to have asperger or some form of autism, try and find a book on amazon about it and stumble across this. It is pretty triggering. Not only for people with autism or people who know and love people who have autism, but I think also for people who have lost loved ones from a form of cancer, or currently are struggling with cancer in their family and/or friend group.

So please, everyone with a amazon account, try and rate this down. 
I’d love for this book to just disappear, but since that’s not really an option, try and help do the second best thing, which is trying to make it disappear from the shelves.

10 Myths About Introverts

Myth #1 – Introverts don’t like to talk.
This is not true. Introverts just don’t talk unless they have something to say. They hate small talk. Get an introvert talking about something they are interested in, and they won’t shut up for days.

Myth #2 – Introverts are shy.
Shyness has nothing to do with being an Introvert. Introverts are not necessarily afraid of people. What they need is a reason to interact. They don’t interact for the sake of interacting. If you want to talk to an Introvert, just start talking. Don’t worry about being polite.

Myth #3 – Introverts are rude.
Introverts often don’t see a reason for beating around the bush with social pleasantries. They want everyone to just be real and honest. Unfortunately, this is not acceptable in most settings, so Introverts can feel a lot of pressure to fit in, which they find exhausting.

Myth #4 – Introverts don’t like people.
On the contrary, Introverts intensely value the few friends they have. They can count their close friends on one hand. If you are lucky enough for an introvert to consider you a friend, you probably have a loyal ally for life. Once you have earned their respect as being a person of substance, you’re in.

Myth #5 – Introverts don’t like to go out in public.
Nonsense. Introverts just don’t like to go out in public FOR AS LONG. They also like to avoid the complications that are involved in public activities. They take in data and experiences very quickly, and as a result, don’t need to be there for long to “get it.” They’re ready to go home, recharge, and process it all. In fact, recharging is absolutely crucial for Introverts.

Myth #6 – Introverts always want to be alone.
Introverts are perfectly comfortable with their own thoughts. They think a lot. They daydream. They like to have problems to work on, puzzles to solve. But they can also get incredibly lonely if they don’t have anyone to share their discoveries with. They crave an authentic and sincere connection with ONE PERSON at a time.

Myth #7 – Introverts are weird.
Introverts are often individualists. They don’t follow the crowd. They’d prefer to be valued for their novel ways of living. They think for themselves and because of that, they often challenge the norm. They don’t make most decisions based on what is popular or trendy.

Myth #8 – Introverts are aloof nerds.
Introverts are people who primarily look inward, paying close attention to their thoughts and emotions. It’s not that they are incapable of paying attention to what is going on around them, it’s just that their inner world is much more stimulating and rewarding to them.

Myth #9 – Introverts don’t know how to relax and have fun.
Introverts typically relax at home or in nature, not in busy public places. Introverts are not thrill seekers and adrenaline junkies. If there is too much talking and noise going on, they shut down. Their brains are too sensitive to the neurotransmitter called Dopamine. Introverts and Extroverts have different dominant neuro-pathways. Just look it up.

Myth #10 – Introverts can fix themselves and become Extroverts.
A world without Introverts would be a world with few scientists, musicians, artists, poets, filmmakers, doctors, mathematicians, writers, and philosophers. That being said, there are still plenty of techniques an Extrovert can learn in order to interact with Introverts. (Yes, I reversed these two terms on purpose to show you how biased our society is.) Introverts cannot “fix themselves” and deserve respect for their natural temperament and contributions to the human race. In fact, one study (Silverman, 1986) showed that the percentage of Introverts increases with IQ.

April is, among other things, Autism Awareness Month, so you may see tables for autism advocacy organizations around (especially on college campuses).

Do not donate to Autism Speaks- they have no autistic people on their board, have refused to hire parents with autistic children, use legal threats to shut down criticism of their organization from people with autism, adheres to the widely-discredited theory that vaccination causes autism (in that they dump money into researching the connection), and are generally not useful or well-liked by actual autistic people.

Generally, the endeavor is like Susan G. Koemen, a big fundraising loop (they sell products to ‘raise awareness’ and then use those proceeds to sell more products) that fails to benefit anyone but those pulling salaries from the effort, who are notably not autistic. Only 4% of their budget goes to services for autistic people and their families.

Instead, donate to the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, through the title link.

(Thanks to greencarnations for the information.)

SERIOUSLY THOUGH

TELL YOUR AUTISTIC KIDS ABOUT AUTISM

DONT AVOID IT AND NEVER MENTION IT BECAUSE YOU DONT WANT IT BROUGHT UP

DONT LEAVE YOUR KID WONDERING WHAT THE HELL IS HAPPENING TO THEM DURING A SHUTDOWN

DONT LET THEM THINK SOMETHING IS WRONG WHEN THEY GET MADE FUN OF FOR STIMMING

DONT TELL THEM NOT TO STIM

LET THEM LOOK AT STIM TOYS

BUY OR MAKE STIM TOYS

DONT AVOID EVERY ASPECT OF AUTISM

DONT JUST TEACH YOUR KID TO ACT ALLISTIC

Social expectations may also play a role in the underdiagnosis of girls. It’s socially acceptable (or even desirable) for a girl to be “shy” or quiet. The same passive tendencies in a boy are perceived as a lack of assertiveness, an unacceptable trait for males in our society.

Throughout childhood I heard that term over and over again. She’s just shy. That excused everything. If I didn’t participate in discussions in school, it was because I was shy. If I sat on the sidelines at a birthday party or went off to read in an empty bedroom at a family party, it was because I was shy. If I didn’t want to be in the school play or I didn’t have many friends–all part of my shyness.

It never occurred to anyone to ask why I liked to be alone or had few friends or avoided social situations. I was a good girl. I didn’t make waves. What was the problem?

Aspie boys are more likely to act out, which is a problem. And aspie boys seem to be less adept than aspie girls at learning to mimic social behaviors. Perhaps this has something to do with the nature of how girls and boys play.

—  “When Being a Good Girl is Bad for You” from Musings of an Aspie
This post is for...
  • Aspies who sometimes can’t speak, despite having no speech delay in early childhood.
  • Aspies who have permanently lost the ability to speak, despite having no speech delay in early childhood.
  • Aspies who are quiet and sensitive, not loud and blundering.
  • Aspies who sit out entire conversations because they can’t figure out where and how to join in, or how to initiate communication.
  • Aspies who stim, a lot, visibly, to the point people assume they’re “low functioning” and are surprised to hear them talk.
  • Aspies who can’t take care of themselves at all, despite what the DSM says about no significant delays in self-help skills.
  • Aspies who have the stereotypical high-tech computer job… and secretly wear diapers because they’re incontinent and always have been.
  • Aspies who are very echolalic, very ‘sensing’, other things more commonly associated with ‘auties’ than ‘aspies’.
  • Aspies with autistic catatonia who have gone from being considered very high functioning to very low functioning in a fairly rapid time span.
  • Aspies who are ‘passive’ or ‘aloof’ rather than ‘active but odd’ or ‘formal’.
  • Aspies who look exactly like many of Kanner’s original patients.
  • Aspies with extremely severe visual processing issues and other sensory issues, well beyond finding certain stimuli painful.
  • Aspies with something resembling visual agnosia.
  • Aspies with an IQ in the 70-90 range.
  • Aspies with an IQ slightly below 70, who got diagnosed with AS anyway (despite this being against the criteria) because some doctors will diagnose AS in people with, say, a 65 IQ, if every single other thing about them fits the Asperger criteria and not the autism one.
  • Aspies who did badly in school, and never made it to college, or did horribly in college or university and never got a degree.
  • Aspies who grew up partly or entirely in self-contained special ed classrooms or schools.
  • Aspies who find it easier to gesture than to speak.
  • Aspies who find body language easier to understand than understanding language.
  • Aspies who are extremely polite and careful about respecting people’s boundaries.
  • Aspies who are quiet and gentle and shy.
  • Aspies whose speech sounds like that of a very young child — they had no early delay in speech, technically, so they got an AS diagnosis, but their speech stalled at the age of five or so, and never got any better than that.  And somehow that doesn’t count as a speech delay because it happened too late.
  • Aspies who grew up being considered severely intellectually disabled, didn’t speak until they were 15 (after first learning to type at age 13), but didn’t have an autism diagnosis at the time.  And now they’re adults and are being diagnosed with Asperger’s because they can speak now and there’s nobody to corroborate their speech or diagnostic history so the doctor just doesn’t care about getting it right.  So now they’re officially an aspie.  (I’ve seen this happen more times than you’d be surprised by.)
  • Aspies who more than meet the criteria for autistic disorder, but aren’t being diagnosed with it because their doctors are ignoring the DSM entirely in favor of their ‘clinical judgement’ that someone has Asperger’s rather than autism based on seeing them as an adult.

Basically, this post is for ‘aspies’ who fit stereotypes normally reserved for ‘auties’, but had (or were presumed to have) no speech delay and (often) don’t meet the criteria for autistic disorder, so got diagnosed with Asperger’s.  Because such people are all over the place, yet when people say ‘aspie’ they never mean them, of course.  Even though they’re frigging everywhere.

It is said that autism is like having a different operating system from other people. I think that is a good way of seeing ourselves and how we operate. Most people are Windows PCs, the artsy people are Macs, and we run on Linux. We will need programs to help us interact with the majority of Windows people. And at our heart is a different, not inferior, operating system.
—  Richard Maguire, Been There. Done That. Try This!: An Aspie’s Guide to Life on Earth
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