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Askos with painted scenes and applied figures. 

Dating to about 270-200 BCE, this askos was found at Cuma in Campania, Italy, and was made at Canosa, Apulia (modern Puglia).

Vessels of this type were evidently not intended to be functional, and were often made to be placed inside tombs. The British Museum houses another Canosan vessel shaped like a head, which you may view here. Canosa was a highly important city of ancient Apulia, which, although influenced by the Greeks, was able to maintain its local culture through to Roman times.

This vase is basically an askos, a simple globular spouted vessel of a shape found in Italy for over two millennia. By the Hellenistic period askoi were over-burdened with a wealth of decoration. This example has two winged horses flying over a brown sea on a pink background. Three winged figures of Nike or Victory stand on the false spouts and handle, and foreparts of horses spring from the body of the vessel. The applied reliefs depict a winged head of the gorgon Medusa and a dancing maenad, a follower of Dionysos. (BM)

Courtesy of & currently located at the British Museum, London, GR 1862.7-12.2. Photos taken by SpirosK photography.

Although Saturday’s hike had it’s ups and downs (downs being: I got extremely wind burnt and I spent my Saturday lost for four hours with a guy named Vlad // ups being: I met a guy named VLAD), we did wander long enough to see the Askoy Bridge lit up after dark and that was pretty lovely. 

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