anthropomorphic

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The Department of Astonishing Anthropomorphism is continually amazed by the countless ways artists are able to evoke human faces, forms and other characteristics in everything from plants and animals to food and inanimate objects, even the weather. It’s an awesome demonstration of our limitless imagination. Today we’re fascinated by the work of Oslo-based artist Tobbe Malm, a blacksmith and photographer who uses his skills to reveal the humanity he perceives in humble metal bolts for an evocative series of sculptures entitled Bolt Poetry.

The bolts were found by Malm in the barn of an old farm in Bergsladen, Sweden, where they had been quietly rusting away for many years:

“The bolts reminded me of human forms, and I felt they had something to tell. I heated them, forged, bent and twisted. I tried to create relations, meetings and situations and suddenly stories emerged about sorrow, joy, pain, warmth and humour. A kind of poetry was created, hence the title.”

Malm deliberately doesn’t title any of his Bolt Poetry sculptures, leaving the viewers to make up their own stories about these emotive pieces of remade metal, to whom he refers to as “bolt people.”

“The bolt people are few in numbers, and maybe these are the last ones, but those that exist will remain to tell their stories.”

Click here to view more of Tobbe Malm’s moving Bolt Poetry sculptures.

Head over to Tobbe Malm’s Behance portfolio to check out some of his other projects.

[via Colossal]

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Egene Koo is an illustrator based in Korea. Her beautifully illustrative oil paintings are a unique fusion of nature, fashion, and portraiture, depicting richly colored wildlife in the same space as over-sized high heels and well-dressed models with wide-eyed cat and rabbit faces, an unusual combination of elements that is both dreamy and unsettling. Check out artist website.

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