Tony Tuesday: Frolicking in the Jungle with Audrey Hepburn

This movie gets such a bad rap, and it’s totally unfair.

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Green Mansions (1959) was one of only 3 films TP made in the 1950s that was in color, and this one outshines them all. Seriously, even though much of the “jungle” set was created on a soundstage, it wasn’t anything less than breathtaking. THAT, at least, I think most people can agree on.

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What’s a little less unanimous is this:

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People looove to drone on about how Tony and Audrey Hepburn were “miscast.” I say PHOOEY!

Okay, so perhaps Tony isn’t the first person that comes to mind when you think “Venezuelan adventurer”, but he doesn’t NOT come to mind either…? I think he put in a pretty solid performance. And he was swarthy enough to be convincing as a South American (kinda). As for Audrey, she played Rima, a girl who grew up in the jungle and can commune with nature and stuff. She’s supposed to be nymph-like and ethereal. So, what’s the problem exactly?? Does Audrey not embody those exact qualities?

I think the problem people were having (and still have) with the casting is that is was completely different than what we were used to from these two. Tony was being groomed as the preppy version of James Dean, and Audrey was known for socialite/debutante-type roles. So people’s eyes just kinda glazed over when this movie came out I guess. :-/

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Fact of the matter is, this flick was romantic as fuck, and TP and AH made a really cute couple.

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Okay, yes, Tony’s brawl with big, brawny Henry Silva was kind of hilarious for all the wrong reasons, but we can forgive that because there’s a REALLY HOT BATHING SCENE, you guys…!!!

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I also love that Tony and Audrey seemed to get along rather well off-camera too. They would have made an adorable couple, if not for the fact that Audrey’s husband was the director of the movie…. #AWKWARD

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Green Mansions was based on a book by William Henry Hudson, and HOLY CRAP… if you think George R.R. Martin is long-winded, you haven’t read the THREE ENTIRE PAGES it took for WHH to just describe Rima’s hair ffs!!

(What I am saying is, skip the book and watch the movie!)

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No one really runs away from anything. It’s like a private trap that holds us in like a prison. You know what I think? I think that we’re all in our private traps, clamped in them, and none of us can ever get out. We scratch and we claw, but only at the air, only at each other, and for all of it, we never budge an inch.

Psycho, 1960 | Alfred Hitchcock.

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"[Norman] gets out and pushes the light-toned car into the dark thick morass of waters to submerge the evidence, watching nervously and nibbling as it slowly gurgles lower and lower into the muck. He cups his hands in front of his chin, fearful that it won’t sink entirely. The car sinks only part way in - and then halts. Norman, looking remarkably like a scared bird, darts his head around anxiously. Then he grins approvingly when it is finally swallowed up…by the blackness. He is relieved that the evidence is covered up."
-Tim Dirks

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Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho: Behind the Scenes

"I once made a movie, rather tongue-in-cheek, called Psycho. The content was, I felt, rather amusing and it was a big joke. I was horrified to find some people took it seriously. It was intended to make people scream and yell and so forth – but no more than screaming and yelling on a switchback railway (rollercoaster). I’m possibly in some respects the man who says in constructing it, ‘how steep can we make the first dip?’ If you make the dip too deep, the screams will continue as the car goes over the edge and destroys everyone. Therefore you mustn’t go too far because you do want them to get off the switchback railway, giggling with pleasure.”
—Alfred Hitchcock