andrew-goldfarb

PORK 15 - SUMMER ISSUE 

24 PAGES OF REAL ROCK&ROLL SLEAZE, STONED FANTASY, DENIM, LEATHER, STUDS, HAIR & SWEAT, GLAZED & SMOKED TO PERFECTION. FREE ON THE STREETS OF MOST AMERICAN CITIES & IN A BUNCH OF FOREIGN LANDS TOO! 

ST. RIPPER - BOSTON’S COMBAT SHOCK ROCKERS INTERVIEWED BY CHRIS PITTMAN OF WHO KILLED SPIKEY JACKET? 

SEAN DIGGER OF REAL CLASS LEATHER - CRUST PUNK ADVENTURER TURNED SALT OF THE EARTH AMERICANA LEATHER WORKER INTERVIEWED BY AMELIA AN OK (CREATE TO DESTROY) 

IAN MILLER - AMAZING GOTHIC FANTASY ARTIST HAS CREATED INCREDIBLE ART IN THE VEIN OF ALBRECHT DURER, PHILIPPE DRUILLET & HIERONYMOUS BOSCH FOR RALPH BAKSHI’S WIZARDS & COOL WORLD, A TOLKIEN BESTIARY, MANY GAMES WORKSHOP/WARHAMMER GAMES, MAGIC THE GATHERING CARDS, HP LOVECRAFT NOVELS & MUCH MORE INTERVIEWED BY SEAN AABERG. 

HAMMERED SATIN - GLAM ROCK STARS, FOXY DUDES, LONELY TIGERS INTERVIEWED BY SEAN 

SKINNER - DEMONIC ARTIST SKINNER HAS SUMMONED A TERRIFYING MURAL OF CTHULHU ON SIZZLE PIE EAST & SEAN TALKS TO HIM ABOUT THE PROCESS OF RENDERING THE UNIMAGINABLE, ART AS DEMONOLOGY & MAGIC BROWNIES. 

DINOS BOYS - ATLANTA NE’ER DO WELL ROCK&ROLLERS CATAPULT YOU UP INTERVIEWED BY SEAN 

DIRTY FENCES - NYC SWEET & SOUR ROCKERS TALK THE KILSYTHE ROCK INTERVIEWED BY SEAN 

COMIC ISLAND WITH COMICS BY: BOBBY MADNESS, BEN LYON, THE SLOW POISONER, MAX CLOTT, CHICO FELIX, THOMAS FERNANDEZ, TALLBOY, THE FORSLEY BROTHERS, JESSE CALIFORNIA & SEAN AABERG. 

EXPANDED PHOTO COMICS SECTION WITH PORK TIME, TIM & TIM, DON’T TELL YOUR MOTHER & NOW THE LIL’PIGS! BY KATIE & SEAN 

BAD IDEAS WITH COLUMNS BY: DAN SHOUP, JJ MK, THE SLOW POISONER, MYKEL BOARD, JAKE RAT, BOBBY MADNESS, THE ILLAGE VIDIOT, JAKE KELLY & A SPECIAL UNBELIEVABLE ZIMBABWE GOBLIN EMERGENCY REPORT FROM JJ MK WITH CHRIS PITTMAN. 

THE RETURN OF STREET & SWEET & THE FINEST SELECTION OF LOW-LIFE ACCESSORIES FOR PORK LIVING AND AN EXPANDED REVIEW SECTION WRITTEN BY THE TROGLODYTE TASTE-MAKER: ROCKY STARCRUSHER. GET YOURS AT THE PORK SHOP!!!

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Following in the footsteps of Coil, Psychic TV and other experimental artists, a one-of-a-kind improvised music collaboration between Flood Damage (Michael Allen Rose), The Slow Poisoner (Andrew Goldfarb) and writer/director John Skipp.

THE SLOW POISONER AT THE LOVECRAFT BAR 6-27-2014

YOU SHOULD BE FAMILIAR WITH THE SLOW POISONER AS HE HAS BEEN A PORK BROTHER SINCE THE EARLY DAYS & IS A STALWART WEIRDO ARTIST & MUSICIAN, HAVING SLOWLY POISONED SAN FRANCISCO & ITS SATELLITES FOR YEARS NOW. I HAVE KNOWN THE SLOW POISONER FOR NEARLY AS LONG & ALSO GAVE HIM HIS FIRST TATTOO IN WEST OAKLAND IN THE OLD PRACTICE SPACE OF FLIPPER.  THE SLOW POISONER IS CURRENTLY CREEPING THROUGH DISEASED HILLOCKS & CANCEROUS SWAMPS AS SOME KIND OF A ONE-MAN BAND, ROCK&ROLL ROOTS & COUNTRY WEIRDO PREACHER - SYRUPLY SINGING ODES TO THE OLDE RELIGION IN A VOICE WHICH MORE OFTEN THAN NOT REMINDS ME OF CAROL CHANNING. AS A POPULAR PERFORMER HE IS AN ANOMALY, BUT AS A HISTORIC ENTITY HE IS ENGAGED WITH A REALITY OF WEIRD AMERICANA THAT SHOULD BE AS COMFORTABLE & FAMILIAR, THOUGH PERHAPS UNSETTLING AS SCORPION PAPERWEIGHTS, MERMAN SKELETONS & ALLIGATOR PAW CHARMS. SINGING SONGS FROM A HELLMOUTH OR CONJURING UP MAGGOTS & WORMS & SPIDERS, THE SLOW POISONER IS A CONSUMMATE CONJURE MAN OF OLD, A WIZARD OF OZ & YOU MUST SEE HIM WHEN HE’S IN TOWN, BUY ONE OF HIS VELVET PAINTINGS, OR HIS VIALS OF CURE-ALL, FROM WHICH ALL ORIGINAL PORK CREW HAS DRANK & OF COURSE HIS RECORDS & COMIC-BOOKS. THE BIZARRO FICTION CREW FROM ERASER-HEAD PRESS WERE ALL THERE AS WELL, THE SLOW POISONER HAVING TRICKED THEM INTO PUBLISHING HIS VERY STRANGE NOVELS. THE LOVECRAFT BAR IS A STRANGE, ANOMALOUS PLACE AS WELL, FITTING FOR THE SLOW POISONER, THERE IS A GIANT NECRONOMICON SEAL ON THE CEILING & TENTACLES. THE AUDIENCE WAS ONE OF THE WARMER ONES I’VE BEEN AROUND IN THE USUALLY CLAMMY PORTLAND. I SUGGESTED THAT THE SLOW POISONER SHOULD DESIGN HIS OWN BLOTTER PAPER & SELL ACID TO HIS AUDIENCE IN THE FUTURE, AMPLIFYING THE SPIRITUAL GATEWAY THAT HE CREATES DURING PERFORMANCES & POSSIBLY TRANSFERRING SOME SOULS OF THE AUDIENCE IN OR OUT OF THIS DIMENSION. 

Gearbox Panel at PAX – “Borderlands,” “Homeworld,” and Lots of Laughs

Gearbox Panel at PAX – “Borderlands,” “Homeworld,” and Lots of Laughs

Jo Wylie ’16 / Emertainment Monthly Staff Writer

 

“Who here likes Borderlands?” At the answering roar from the packed Main Theatre, Gearbox CEO Randy Pitchford threw a joke to the crowd: “Oh, I thought you were all here for our work on 007: Nightfire.” And so the Gearbox Panel started, Sunday morning at PAX East2014. With Gearbox panelists Randy Pitchford (President), Brian Martel (Executive…

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Why Ubisoft Delays Games: An IGN Editorial By Andrew Goldfarb. Shared By Playstation Innovation

Ubisoft isn’t afraid to delay a game if it thinks it can be better. Following delays for several of Ubisoft’s major titles in both 2012 and 2013, North American president Laurent Detoc explained to IGN the thought process behind pushing games, and how it fits into the company’s long-term strategy.

“It’s a very intense decision,” Detoc told IGN. “I think one of the fascinating things about this industry is that you can go from genius to idiot in an extremely short time frame. These are some of those moments, where you’re riding sky high on Watch Dogs or Rayman, and then suddenly you have to break it to the outside world, and sometimes even convince the inside people. Not everybody agrees. You have to say, ‘this is in the best interest of the product, to do this,’ because at the end of the day we’re going to be able to do this extra fine tuning.”

Detoc explained that the scope of these delays varies greatly, from a few months of polish for Far Cry 3 to a massive, multi-year reworking of a game like Splinter Cell: Conviction. In the case of this year’s highest-profile delay, Watch Dogs, Detoc says while it came as a shock to fans, some people at Ubisoft were equally surprised.

“I’ll tell you, at Gamescom, everybody was looking each other in the eye thinking we would be there at launch,” Detoc said regarding Watch Dogs, which was originally scheduled to be ready for the launch of next-gen consoles but has now been pushed to 2014. “There were already some lingering doubts, but we were plowing through it. There were more than a thousand people touching that game. Then eventually, a month later, we said, ‘this is not gonna fly.’ Then it takes a few more weeks to decide how we’re going to package that news for everyone. It’s not just about delaying for the sake of delaying it. No matter how hard we try, we also put out games that are not good quality, unfortunately. It’s not because we go out and say, ‘great, let’s make a piece of junk and put it out there.’ It’s really painful to us. But some games, you just can’t make them that much better because of how they’ve been progressing. Part of the decision to delay Watch Dogs is also that. We know it’s not where we want it to be. Can it get there? What will it take to get there? That’s why it takes a longer process. But in August we really thought we were going to have that game at launch.”
Watch Dogs could have ended up being the best-rated game on next gen if it came out at launch.
Still, Detoc is optimistic about Watch Dogs, which he feels, despite some stumbles, is an extremely strong product.
“I actually believe that Watch Dogs could have ended up being the best-rated game on next gen if it came out at launch. We wanted it to be even higher,” Detoc told us. “The whole package is there already. But without sending them too many flowers, the guys at Rockstar have showed us again that if you make a 96-percent game, people will come. Watch Dogs, I can only hope we get to that level. There’s an attachment to the brand, in the case of GTA, that makes people really want to give it that 100-percent review. We’ll be missing that on Watch Dogs until we go further, potentially. That’s what we’re after.”
Detoc knows that South Park: The Stick of Truth, another high-profile delay this year, could have been a huge seller this Christmas, but it was in the best interest for the game – and, ultimately, for consumers – to push it to next year.
South Park: The Stick of Truth Delayed
“It’s a huge brand. It’s interesting, because the South Park guys are extremely demanding. They’re very professional. They want the best for their brand. We get along with each other fairly well because we’re quite receptive to their requests. If we get to this level of quality, it’s going to be a bigger success,” he explained. “Their season ends at the beginning of December. We were all trying to lock this in. We looked at the game and we said, ‘we need to delay this.’ It was sort of preaching to the choir, because we knew they also wanted what was best for the product. But it was an easy decision, because we wanted to make a better product. It was not a good commercial decision at the time, because you’re going to miss those December sales. 18 months from now? I think we’ll make that up.”
South Park was a rare case for Ubisoft, who traditionally deals with its dozens of internal studios, to publish a game created by a third party. It’s also a unique situation since the license was purchased from THQ when the former publisher was dissolved in January.
One of the fascinating things about this industry is that you can go from genius to idiot in an extremely short time frame.
“It took a while to understand what they wanted. We already had the game. The game was supposed to be done by March and shipping in May or June. We bought it in January. It was a few weeks to pre-alpha. It was in the can. Then we had a couple of meetings with the guys from South Park, and we realized that this was not at all where they wanted to go,” Detoc explained. “Then we said, ‘do we want to have a fight with these guys and ship the game without their support?’ Be the guy who did the bad South Park game? Or do we bite the bullet and say, ‘fine, give it another six months and see if we can get there?’ In the end we had to give it another nine or 10 months. That’s more than we thought. But we really reshuffled the cards dramatically with this one. It was trickier, because it was a third party – both Obsidian and South Park Digital Studios are third parties – in addition to what we’re typically dealing with. So this one was more complicated. In this particular case, if you keep those two guys engaged, Matt and Trey are really funny guys. They want to put their hearts into making the game

Following a delay, Detoc told us, the hard part is deciding when to re-reveal a title that’s been pushed. We asked when the public might get its next chance to see Watch Dogs, and Detoc had a simple answer: “When we have something good to show again.” He believes that there’s no simple formula for timing something like that, explaining that building games is “not a perfect science. It’s not just software. It’s art. There’s a lot of judgment and perception that comes into this. It’s extremely complicated, with a lot of moving parts. Especially with a game like Watch Dogs. We’re breaking ground on a number of different gameplay assets. We’re in uncharted territory.”
It’s not a perfect science. It’s not just software. It’s art.
“We would not be pushing games that much if we didn’t believe that the quality would have a positive impact,” Detoc said about delays in general. Still, not every delay magically fixes a game’s problems, and he admits that Ubisoft has made the mistake in the past of putting extra months into a game that probably should have just met its original target.
“We tend to favor what the people who make the games want to do in this company. Not every company behaves that way,” he said. “But yes, sometimes you delay a game and you hope it’s going to get better, and you make the wrong decision, because you still can’t fit a square peg in a round hole. You would have been better off just shipping as opposed to continuing to invest. We tend to be guilty of continuing to invest, probably, more often than others, because that’s sort of the promise of people who work at Ubisoft. We give a lot of creative freedom. That’s why we put out so many new brands, by the act of it.

“Could we make more money if we did it another way? Maybe. There’s a long term and short term mentality that comes into play here. Ubisoft is very much focused on the long term. That’s why quality is important. It’s why I talk about brands the way I did earlier. It’s why we built all these studios,” he continued. “We have this motto inside the company: we want games to enrich people’s lives. Starting from there, you give a lot of creative freedom to anybody and everybody who wants to do some game that can go along with that. Then you start Rocksmith. You say, ‘yeah, we’ll get people to learn real-world skills. We’ll enrich their lives.’ When you make a game like Assassin’s Creed, you say, ‘how crazy can we go? We’ll have a guy who travels through time and do an insane amount of research on every period of history.’ There’s a lot of history that goes into these games. We’re not just sending a guy with a sword after another guy with a sword. I don’t like to use the word much, because I think some people disagree, but there’s a real art that goes into making these products. Do we give too much freedom for our own good? Maybe. But I think that so long as we continue to be in business and make enough money, it’s a good thing.”
Still, Ubisoft is a business, and while it tries to give as much freedom as possible to the teams making games, finding a way to make a profit is still obviously a major factor, especially since there are investors to please. Detoc believes that need to have a profitable business can still be balanced with the desire for creators to express themselves artistically.
“This is a testament to Yves Guillemot. It’s his vision, his company. This is a place where people feel comfortable working,” Detoc said. “They feel they’re respected. It translates into how people make these games as well. They know we respect their opinions. We try to help them so they don’t make products that don’t sell, but we really favor creativity, as opposed to having people say, ‘what game do you want me to make?’ We’ve talked about the products themselves, but this is something that you find throughout the company in general.”