americanum

Caught this Eastern Tent Caterpillar just starting to make a cocoon. Stopped back by and got an “after” photo. Lots of the moths have already emerged here. The eastern tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americanum) is a species of moth in the family Lasiocampidae, the snout moths. It is univoltine, producing one generation per year. It is a tent caterpillar, a social species that forms communal nests in the branches of trees. It is sometimes confused with the gypsy moth and the fall webworm, and may be erroneously referred to as a bagworm, which is the common name applied to unrelated caterpillars in the family Psychidae. The moths oviposit almost exclusively on trees in the plant family Rosaceae, particularly cherry (Prunus) and apple (Malus). The caterpillars are hairy with areas of blue, white, black and orange. The blue and white colors are structural colors created by the selective filtering of light by microtubules that arise on the cuticle. More - http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_tent_caterpillar

10

It’s that time of year again! Wildflower season in Southeastern Ohio! I’ve done my best with the help of friends to key all these out, if there are any corrections feel free to give me a heads up. Here we go:

  • Dutchman’s Breeches (Dicentra cucullaria)
  • Squirrel Corn (Dicentra canadensis)
  • Large-flowered Trillium (Trillium grandiflorum)
  • Wild Ginger (Asarum canadense)
  • Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis)
  • Pennsylvania Bittercress (Cardamine pensylvanica)
  • Purple Dead Nettle (Lamium purpureum)
  • Trout Lily (Erythronium americanum)
  • Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica)
  • Sharp-lobed Hepatica (Hepatica acutiloba)

There are a few more I’ll share but they wouldn’t quite fit in this set, and there are hundreds more that I’ll be looking for out there! Happy botanizing everyone!

Saw a bunch of trout lilies (Erythronium americanum) the other day. The spring ephemerals are here! Does anyone else enjoy walking through the forest and identifying plants?

Krik

Postdoc: UVirginia.PlantEcologicalGenetics
–_000_D15DD1EC43A49lg8beservicesvirginiaedu_ Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“us-ascii” Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Department of Biology at the University of Virginia invites applications for a postdoctoral Research Associate position in the lab of Dr. Laura Galloway. The position is supported by an NSF-funded project to explore the relationship between biogeography and mating system evolution in American bellflower (Campanulastrum americanum). Mating systems are evolutionarily labile and variation is often explained by hypotheses focusing on the context-dependent benefits of selfing (e.g. reproductive assurance). However, mating system evolution may be driven by historical changes in genetic load. In particular, colonization from glacial refugia to current distributions often entailed bottlenecks and small population sizes that shape population genetic structure and hence potential for mating system evolution. Our goal is to integrate studies of biogeography and mating system using Campanulastrum americanum, a North American herb in which preliminary data indicate reduced inbreeding depression and greater autogamy in sites where phylogeographic data suggest recent colonization. The Research Associate will work with the PI, our collaborator Jeremiah Busch (Washington State Univ), and lab personnel to design and lead research in the lab and field. The Research Associate will conduct greenhouse studies of genetic load and mechanisms of autogamy, field studies of factors that underlie pollen limitation, estimate population selfing rate and interact with collaborators determining population genetic structure. The position also involves data management and dissemination, preparing manuscripts, and mentoring graduate and undergraduate students. The ideal candidate will enjoy working both in a team and independently, and may use the appointment to develop and pursue additional related studies. Finally, this position will coordinate outreach activities at Mountain Lake Biological Station and an Environmental Studies Academy at a local high school. Demonstrated expertise in ecological genetics including field and greenhouse work and strong written and oral communication skills are required. Experience in evolutionary genetics is desirable. The completion of a PhD degree in Biology or related field by the appointment start date is required. Preferred appointment start date is Summer 2015. This is a two-year appointment; the appointment may be renewed for an additional year, contingent upon availability of funds and satisfactory performance. To apply, please submit a candidate profile through Jobs@UVA (http://bit.ly/1ccxWRu) and electronically attach: curriculum vitae with list of publications, a cover letter that summarizes research interests and professional goals, and contact information for three (3) references; search on posting number 0616239. Review of applications will begin May 9, 2015; however, the position will remain open until filled. Questions regarding this position should be directed to: Dr. Laura Galloway (lgalloway@virginia.edu) Questions regarding the Candidate Profile process or Jobs@UVA should be directed to: Rich Haverstrom (rkh6j@virginia.edu) The University will perform background checks on all new hires prior to making a final offer of employment. The University of Virginia is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Women, minorities, veterans and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. –_000_D15DD1EC43A49lg8beservicesvirginiaedu_ Content-Type: text/html; charset=“us-ascii” Content-ID: Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The Department of Biology at the University of Virginia invites applications for a postdoctoral Research Associate position in the lab of Dr. Laura Galloway. The position is supported by an NSF-funded project to explore the relationship between biogeography and mating system evolution in American bellflower (Campanulastrum americanum).
Mating systems are evolutionarily labile and variation is often explained by hypotheses focusing on the context-dependent benefits of selfing (e.g. reproductive assurance). However, mating system evolution may be driven by historical changes in genetic load. In particular, colonization from glacial refugia to current distributions often entailed bottlenecks and small population sizes that shape population genetic structure and hence potential for mating system evolution. Our goal is to integrate studies of biogeography and mating system using Campanulastrum americanum, a North American herb in which preliminary data indicate reduced inbreeding depression and greater autogamy in sites where phylogeographic data suggest recent colonization. 
The Research Associate will work with the PI, our collaborator Jeremiah Busch (Washington State Univ), and lab personnel to design and lead research in the lab and field. The Research Associate will conduct greenhouse studies of genetic load and mechanisms of autogamy, field studies of factors that underlie pollen limitation, estimate population selfing rate and interact with collaborators determining population genetic structure. The position also involves data management and dissemination, preparing manuscripts, and mentoring graduate and undergraduate students. The ideal candidate will enjoy working both in a team and independently, and may use the appointment to develop and pursue additional related studies. Finally, this position will coordinate outreach activities at Mountain Lake Biological Station and an Environmental Studies Academy at a local high school.
Demonstrated expertise in ecological genetics including field and greenhouse work and strong written and oral communication skills are required. Experience in evolutionary genetics is desirable. 
The completion of a PhD degree in Biology or related field by the appointment start date is required. Preferred appointment start date is Summer 2015. This is a two-year appointment; the appointment may be renewed for an additional year, contingent upon availability of funds and satisfactory performance.
To apply, please submit a candidate profile through Jobs@UVA (http://bit.ly/1ccxWRu) and electronically attach: curriculum vitae with list of publications, a cover letter that summarizes research interests and professional goals, and contact information for three (3) references; search on posting number 0616239.
Review of applications will begin May 9, 2015; however, the position will remain open until filled.
Questions regarding this position should be directed to: Dr. Laura Galloway  (lgalloway@virginia.edu)
Questions regarding the Candidate Profile process or Jobs@UVA should be directed to: Rich Haverstrom (rkh6j@virginia.edu)
The University will perform background checks on all new hires prior to making a final offer of employment.
The University of Virginia is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Women, minorities, veterans and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.   

–_000_D15DD1EC43A49lg8beservicesvirginiaedu

via Gmail
Beavers The Size of Bears: Extinction, Survival and Evolution in Kentucky

Researchers at an old geological site talk ‘dirt’ about how Ice Age climate change led to the extinction of mammoths and mastodons, but to the evolution and survival of bison, deer and other present-day species. This is an 18,000 year-old mastodon molar (Mammut americanum).Credit: Tom Robinette, UCThe answers to extinction, survival and evolution are right here in the dirt,“ says University of Cincinnati Quaternary science researcher Ken Tankersley, associate professor of anthropology and geology. "And we are continually surprised by what we find."While many scientists focus on species’ extinction wherever there has been rapid and profound climate change, Tankersley looks closely at why certain species survived.For many years he has invited students and faculty from archeology and geology, and representatives from the Cincinnati Museum Center and Kentucky State Parks to participate in an in-the-field investigation at a rich paleontological and archeological site not too far from UC’s campus.Through scores of scientific data extracted from fossilized vegetation and the bones and teeth of animals and humans, Tankersley has been able to trace periods of dramatic climate change, what animals roamed the Earth during those epochs and how they survived. And his most recent evidence reveals when humans came on the scene and how they helped change the environment in Big Bone Lick, Kentucky."What we found is that deforestation efforts over 5,000 years ago by humans significantly modified the environment to the degree that the erosion began filling in the Ohio River Valley, killing off much of the essential plant life,” says Tankersley. http://b4in.com/pNnH