6

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – VIII

Eighth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.

The Met Tower Bangkok, Thailand (2009)

Architect: WOHA Architects, Singapore

Description (from the AKAA):

Rather than adopting high-rise models from temperate countries, this 66-storey central Bangkok development adapts aspects of low-rise tropical housing to spaces in the sky. Naturally cross-ventilated, the apartments require no air conditioning. Open-air terraces with barbecues, libraries, spas and other facilities link the three towers every five storeys and act as structural bracing. The main columns extend on the exterior of the building, creating protected indoor-outdoor spaces for balconies and terraces, and are lit at night, transforming the building into an elegant, vertical screen. The staggered block arrangement gives apartments light and air on all four sides. Thai elements – ceramic tiles, textiles and timber panelling – are abstracted to organise forms. Every horizontal surface is planted, and vertical faces are shaded by creeper screens.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture; all photographs by Patrick Bingham-Hall; site plan courtesy of the architect

Just so we’re all on the same hilariously inept page, Emperor Nero was an awful athlete and an even worse person. For example one of Nero’s favorite hobbies was dressing all in black and roaming the streets of his city at night stabbing and mugging people. And he was so bad at singing (an Olympic event at the time) that members of the audience would feign being dead to avoid listening to the shrill, birdlike screams he called his singing voice. Seriously — he made Joffrey from Game of Thrones look like a capable ruler, because at least the heir of House Baratheon wasn’t insane from lead poisoning.

Using his role as emperor and the vast wealth of the Roman empire, Nero funded dozens of musical contests to show off his “talents” and he outfitted his personal racing chariot with so many horses that from a distance it kind of looked like a furry centipede.

Two of my favourite things to write about are ancient Roman/Greek history and stupid things. Thankfully this site gives me an outlet for writing about both.

8

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – I

First in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.

Apartment No.1 Mahallat, Iran (2010)

Architect: AbCT – Architecture by Collective Terrain, Tehran, Iran

Description (from the AKAA):

The majority of Mahallat’s economy is engaged in the business of cutting and treating stone, over half of which is discarded due to inefficiencies in stone-cutting technology. This project turns the inefficiency to economic and environmental advantage by reusing leftover stones for both exterior and some interior walls, and has led to the increasing adoption of stone recycling by local builders. The five-storey structure comprises two ground-level retail spaces and eight three-bedroom apartments above. Its austere prismatic form is balanced by the warmth of the natural materials. Small windows are shielded by triangular stone protrusions, and larger ones have wooden shutters that allow residents to regulate light and temperature levels.

Image credits: all photographs copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture and Omid Khodapanahi; isometric drawing copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture, courtesy of the architect.

Akaa Top 10

Today’s Route in Akaa - Only Within A Stone’s Throw From Tampere

Situated only half an hour away from Tampere, the City of Akaa offers a great variety of cultural activities for all ages. 

Fascinate yourself with steam and diesel locomotives in the Locomotive Museum, enjoy environmental art in Näkymä and buzz around with bees in the Hunajahulinat farmer’s market at the end of August. 

Take a train from Tampere, Turku or Helsinki and meet a real Finland in Akaa!

http://bit.ly/NomadiAkaa

www.citynomadi.com

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5

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – IV

Fourth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.

Mapungubwe Interpretation Centre Limpopo, South Africa (2009)

Architect: Peter Rich Architects, Johannesburg, South Africa

Description (from the AKAA):

The plan for the Centre takes inspiration from a motif etched on stones uncovered on the site at Mapungubwe Hill, a World Heritage site located at the confluence of the Limpopo and Shashe Rivers. Exhibition and learning spaces take the form of ten free-form vaults, the largest of which spans 14.5 metres, and a number of regular barrel vaults and domes which are arranged in a triangular layout linked together by ramped walkways. The vaulting method used relies on fast-setting gypsum mortar and earth tiles laid on edge. Low environmental impact is achieved through employing local labour and materials.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture and: 1, 5. Obie Oberholzer; 2. Peter Rich Architects; 3. Robert Rich; 4. Jean-Charles Tall

8

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – III

Third in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.

Islamic Cemetery Altach, Austria (2011)

Architect: Bernardo Bader Architects, Tehran, Iran

Description (from the AKAA):

The Cemetery serves Vorarlberg, the industrialised westernmost state of Austria, where over eight percent of the population is Muslim. It finds inspiration in the primordial garden, and is delineated by roseate concrete walls in an alpine setting, and consists of five staggered, rectangular grave-site enclosures, and a structure housing assembly and prayer rooms. The principal materials used were exposed reinforced concrete for the walls and oak wood for the ornamentation of the entrance facade and the interior of the prayer space. The visitor is greeted by and must pass through the congregation space with its wooden latticework in geometric Islamic patterns. The space includes ablution rooms and assembly rooms in a subdued palette that give onto a courtyard. The prayer room on the far side of the courtyard reprises the lattice-work theme with Kufic calligraphy in metal mesh on the ‘qibla’ wall.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture and: 1, 6-8. Adolf Bereuter; 2, 5. Marc Lins; 3, 4. Bernardo Bader

8

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – VI

Sixth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.

Salam Cardiac Surgery Center Khartoum, Sudan (2010)

Architect: Studio Tamassociati, Venice, Italy

Description (from the AKAA):

The Salam Centre for Cardiac Surgery consists of a hospital with 63 beds and 300 local staff, with a separate Medical Staff Accommodation Compound sleeping 150 people. The centre is built as a pavilion in a garden with both primary buildings organised around large courtyards. The hospital block is of the highest technical standard with complex functions including three operating theatres optimally placed in relation to the diagnostics laboratories and ward. Mixed modes of ventilation and natural light enable all spaces to be homely and intimate yet secure. Seeing the abandoned containers that had been used to transport construction materials for the Salam Centre for Cardiac Surgery, the architects were inspired to reuse them to house the centre’s staff. Ninety 20-foot containers form the accommodation block, each unit consisting of 1.5 containers, with a bathroom and small veranda facing the garden. Seven 40-foot containers are occupied by a cafeteria and services. Insulation is through an ‘onion system’ of 5-centimetre internal insulating panels and an outer skin comprising a ventilated metal roof and bamboo blinds. A solar farm powers the water-heating system.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture and: 1, 3-4. Marcello Bonfanti; 2. courtesy of the architects; 5-8. Raul Pantaleo

Tehy ja Akaa napit vastakkain lomautuksista

Terveydenhuoltoalan järjestö Tehy on kannellut aluehallintovirastoon Akaan kaupungin henkilöstösäästöistä. Tehy epäilee, saavutetaanko lomautuksilla pitkän tähtäimen säästöjä. http://dlvr.it/6b529d

I DIDNT SLEEP AND I FEE L LIKE IM ACTUALLY GONNA CRY?? about AKAA SHI IM LACKINNF SLEEP AND NOW IM GONAN cry about akaashi is this even real why are there tears on my eyes keiji is so important and i bet he cares so much but he was just born with a bitchy face and i feel like people think hes bored but no its just his fac e and im crying i love akaashi

7

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – V

Fifth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.

Kantana Film and Animation Institute Nakhon Pathom, Thailand (2011)

Architect: Bangkok Project Studio, Bangkok, Thailand

Description (from the AKAA):

Massive eight-metre-high handmade brick walls with undulating geometric profiles characterise this undergraduate college. They are supported by a steel inner structure, the cavity between inner and outer skin affording protection against heat transfer. The complex’s five different areas - administration office, lecture room, workshop, library and canteen - are all connected by an ‘inserted forest’ in the form of a greystone and concrete pathway punctuated by trees, running centrally along a solid east-west and a broken north-south axis. Where this extends beyond the confines of the functional buildings, openings in the walls provide relaxation spaces and a link with the green landscaping beyond.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture and: 1, 3-5. Pirak Anurakyawachon; 2. Boonserm Premthada; 6-7. Xaroj Prawong

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