agalychnis-callidryas

Signaling behavior in the Red-eyed tree frog

Red-eyed tree frogs, Agalychnis callidryas (Hylidae), form nocturnal mating aggregations in vegetation over Mesoamerican wet forest ponds.

Males defend calling sites, maintaining a spacing of at least 0.5 m. Most females pair with one male, but multimale amplexus and paternity occur, and aggression between amplectant and unpaired males is common.

During contests over females, competing males use chuckle calls and perform a display wherein the signaler raises his body off the plant and then rapidly contracts and extends his hindlimbs, shaking his hind end (tremulation).

Because tremulating males likely excite strong, stereotyped vibrations in plants, it has been hypothesized that this display generates a vibrational signal, or possibly a bimodal signal with both visual and vibrational components.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Nicolas Reusens

Locality: unknown

Red-eyed tree frog life cycle in watercolour and technical pen on Arches hotpress watercolour board. 

Finally posting this piece, which I finished a while ago. This was part of my semi-private lessons on topics in scientific illustration, and was the first time I’d made a descriptive illustration in watercolour (usually, it’s Adobe Illustrator). I’ve discovered that I’m not so skilled in painting backgrounds, but it was an interesting learning experience, and I think that it would be fun to try again some day. I’m not crazy about the illustration board I use, since it curved severely under heavy washes, so next time I’ll probably use stretched or heavy hotpress paper. On the plus side, it holds up remarkably well to multiple layers of liquid masking fluid. 

RED EYED TREEFROG (Adult)
Agalychnis callidryas
©Careyjamesbalboa

Red-eyed tree frogs, as their name states, have red eyes with vertically narrowed noses, a vibrant green body with yellow and blue striped sides, and orange toes. There is a great deal of regional variation in flank and thigh coloration

The red-eyed tree frog has three eyelids and sticky pads on its toes. Phyllomedusid tree frogs are arboreal animals, meaning they spend a majority of their life in trees, which also makes them great jumpers.

Red-eyed tree frogs are not poisonous and rely on camouflage to protect themselves. During the day, they remain motionless in cryptid position — they cover their blue sides with their back legs, tuck their bright feet under their stomach, and shut their red eyes. Thus, they appear almost completely green, and well hidden among the foliage.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agalychnis_callidryas

Other photos you may like:

Southern Orange-Legged Leaf Frog

Red-Backed Poison Dart Frog

Cuban Tree Frog

RED-EYED TREEFROG
Agalychnis callidryas
Karen Warkentin, Boston Univ./ STRI

Eggs may not seem to do anything except sit around waiting to hatch, but the embryos inside them can do lots of behaving. That’s what undergraduate researcher Jessica Rogge of Boston University found after observing the directed movements of red-eyed treefrog embryos through the walls of their translucent, jelly-covered eggs. Rogge and Boston University associate professor Karen Warkentin found that even early on, the larval treefrogs wriggle around within their cramped quarters to find the “sweet spot” near the surface that is richest in oxygen.

When Rogge gently repositioned the embryos with a probe, turning the small bodies away from their oxygen banquet, the embryos quickly flipped themselves back into their favorite pose with gills fanned wide. Even the youngest embryos—without blood, gills, or muscles—would slowly cruise back into place.

Instead of depositing eggs in water, as most female frogs do, the red-eyed treefrog, an arboreal hylid native to Neotropical rainforests in Central America, lays her eggs on the underside of a leaf overhanging water. Tadpoles can hatch and drop into the water below just four days after the eggs are laid. But time is on their side—the longer they wait before hatching, the better equipped they will be to escape hungry mouths waiting in the water below.

Fact Source: http://accessscience.com/IOW/iow.aspx?iowID=40

Other photos you may like:

Newly hatched Indian Ornamental Tree Spiders

White Spotted Bamboo Shark Embryos

Arowana with babies living in its mouth

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Red eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas)

The red-eyed tree frog is an arboreal tree frog native to Neotropical rainforests in Central America. The red-eyed tree frog has three eyelids, and sticky pads on its toes. They are excellent jumpers. Red-eyed tree frogs are not poisonous and rely on camouflage to protect themselves. During the day, they remain motionless, cover their blue sides with their back legs, tuck their bright feet under their stomachs, and shut their red eyes. Thus, they appear almost completely green, and well hidden among the foliage. Red-eyed tree frogs are insectivores that eat crickets, moths, flies, and other insects. During mating season, the male frogs shake the branches where they are sitting to improve their chances of finding a mate by keeping rivals at bay. This is the first evidence that tree-dwelling vertebrates use vibration to communicate.photo credits: Careyjamesbalboa, fanpop

Red-eyed Tree Frog Nictitating Membrane by marlin harms on Flickr.

Many different kinds of animals have a nictitating membrane. “The nictitating membrane (from Latin nictare, to blink) is a transparent or translucent third eyelid present in some animals that can be drawn across the eye for protection and to moisten it while maintaining visibility.”—Wikipedia. I am amazed at the pattern of this membrane.
Captive frog.

RED-EYED TREE FROG
Agalychnis callidryas
©AnimalExplorer/Paul Bratescu

The Red-eyed Treefrog is an arboreal hylid native to Neotropical rainforests in Central America.

Red-eyed tree frogs, as their name states, have red eyes with vertically narrowed noses, a vibrant green body with yellow and blue striped sides, and orange toes. There is a great deal of regional variation in flank and thigh coloration.

Red-eyed tree frogs are not poisonous and rely on camouflage to protect themselves. During the day, they remain motionless, cover their blue sides with their back legs, tuck their bright feet under their stomach, and shut their red eyes. Thus, they appear almost completely green, and well hidden among the foliage.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agalychnis_callidryas

Other posts:

Marsupial Frog - carries tadpoles on her back

Glass Frog - see through skin shows internal organs

Red Eyed Tree Fog -full body photo