aethiopicus

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Marbled Lungfish (Protopterus aethiopicus)

Also known as the Leopard Lungfish, the marbled lungfish is a species of lobe-finned fish found throughout Northeast Africa. Like other lungfish the marbled lungfish can breath air using a special lung like appendage. Using their ‘lungs’ these fish can live in streams and swamps that are dry for long periods of time, emerging when the water returns. Marbled lungfish usually inhabit rivers, swamps and floodplains where they feed on molluscs, fish and insects. The marbled lungfish is also one of the few animals that have had their genome’s sequenced it also has one of the largest genomes of all vertebrates at an outstanding 133 billion base pairs long!

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Sarcopterygii-Dipnoi-Lepidosireniformes-Protopteridae-Protopterus-aethiopicus

Image Source(s)

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Pic 1Australopithecus aethiopicuswas discovered in West TurkanaKenya by archeologist Alan Walker in 1985. (2.5 million years old) Read More

Pic 2Australopithecus boiseidiscovered by anthropologist Mary Leakey on July 17, 1959, at Olduvai GorgeTanzania (1.75 million years old) Read More

Pic 3.  Australopithecus robustusdiscovered in Southern Africa in 1938(2 million years old) Read more

So, it's transitional fossils you want, Bucko! Well, a short list is below. Google those and check back in a couple months dude

Primates

Darwinius masillae— a link between earlier primates and later ones.

Non-human primate to human

Sahelanthropus tchadensis— One of the oldest known species in the human family tree. Lived around 6.5-7 million years
ago, one of the earliest bi-pedal fossils.
Orrorin tugenensis— Over 20 fossils of the 6 million year old species have been found and show very human-like
morphology.
Ardipithecus ramidus— 4.5 million year old species showing bi-pedal adaptations and opposable thumbs.
Australopithecus— a genus of bipedal apes
Australopithecus anamensis
Australopithecus afarensis
Kenyanthropus platyops— 3.5 million year old himinim fossil, most likely a subspecies of Australopithecus
Australopithecus africanus
Australopithecus garhi
Australopithecus sediba— advanced australopithecus showing more human features
Australopithecus aethiopicus
Australopithecus robustus
Australopithecus boisei
Homo habilis— a transitional form from Australopithecus to later Homo
Homo rudolfensis— a type of Homo habilis or a different species
Homo ergaster— a form of Homo erectus or a distinct species
Homo georgicus— a form of Homo Erectus or a distinct species
Homo erectus— a transitional form from Australopithecus to later Homo (Latin for humans) species
Homo antecessor— is an extinct human species, or subspecies, dating from 1.2 million to 800,000 years ago
Homo heidelbergensis— A possible common ancestor of modern man and homo neanderthalensis
Homo neanderthalensis— They may or may not have done Humpy bumpy with modern humans.
Homo floresiensis— Extinct Homo species, living 94,000-12,000 years ago, used tools, bipedal, very human-like
Cro-magnon— considered early modern human and perhaps as smart as we are
Invertebrate to Vertebrate

Unnamed Upper (U.) Pre-Cambrian chordate — First to bear a primitive notochord; archaetypical chordate.
Pikaia gracilens— Middle (M.) Cambrian chordate with lancelet-like morphology.
Haikouella— Lower (L.) Cambrian chordate, first to bear a skull; archaetypical craniate.
Haikouichthys— L. Cambrian quasi-vertebrate, intermediate in developing a vertebral column; archaetypical vertebrate.
Conodonts— U. Cambrian to Triassic quasi-vertebrates with spinal cord; “bug-eyed lampreys”.
Myllokunmingia— L. Cambrian vertebrate with primitive spinal column; oldest true crown-group vertebrate.
Arandaspis— L. Ordovician vertebrate, armoured jawless fish (ostracoderm), oldest known vertebrate with hard parts known
from (mostly) complete fossils.

Jawless Fish to Jawed Vertebrate

Birkenia— Silurian primitive, jawless fish, a typical member of the Anaspida
Cephalaspis— Silurian armoured jawless fish, archaetypical member of the “Osteostraca,” sister group to all jawed
vertebrates.
Shuyu— Silurian to Devonian, armoured jawless fish belonging to Galeaspida, related to Osteostraca. Internal cranial
anatomy very similar to the anatomy seen in basal jawed vertebrates. This similarity is directly implied with the translation
of its name, “Dawn Fish,” with the implication that it represents the “dawn of jawed vertebrates.”

Acanthodian to Shark

Ptomacanthus— sharklike fish, originally described as an acanthodian fish: brain anatomy demonstrates that it is an
intermediate between acanthodians and sharks.
Cladoselache— primitive/basal shark.
Tristychius— another sharklike fish.
Ctenacanthus— primitive/basal shark.
Paleospinax— sharklike jaw, primitive teeth.
Spathobatis— Ray-like fish.
Protospinax— Ancestral to both sharks and skates.

Primitive Jawed Fish to Bony Fish

Acanthodians— superficially similar to early bony fishes, and some have been identified as being the ancestors of sharks.
Palaeoniscoids— primitive bony fishes.
Canobius, Aeduella— palaeoniscoids with more advanced jaws.
Parasemionotus— combination of modern cheeks with more primitive features, like lungs
Oreochima— first teleost fish
Leptolepids— vaguely herring-like ancestors of modern teleost fish. Lung modified into swim bladder.
Amphistium and Heteronectes— percomorphs that demonstrate the transition of the eye location of flatfishes.

Fish to amphibian

Paleoniscoids— both ancestral to modern fish and land vertebrates.
Osteolepis— modified limb bones, amphibian like skull and teeth.
Kenichthys— shows the position of exhaling nostrils moving from front to fish to throat in tetrapods in its halfway point, in
the teeth
Eusthenopteron, Sterropterygion— fin bones similarly structured to amphibian feet, but no toes yet, and still fishlike bodily
proportions.
Panderichthys, Elpistostege— tetrapod-like bodily proportions.
Obruchevichthys— fragmented skeleton with intermediate characteristics, possible first tetrapod.
Tiktaalik— a fish with developing legs. Also appearance of ribs and neck.
Acanthostega gunnari— famous intermediate fossil. most primitive fossil that is known to be a tetrapod
Ichthyostega— like Acanthostega, another fishlike amphibian
Hynerpeton— A little more advanced then Acanthostega and Ichtyostega
Labyrinthodonts— still many fishlike features, but tailfins have disappeared
Lungfish—A fish-that has lungs.

Primitive to modern amphibians

Temnospondyls
Dendrerpeton acadianum
Archegosaurus decheni
Eryops megacephalus
Trematops
Amphibamus lyelli
Doleserpeton annectens
Triadobatrachus— primitive frog
Vieraella
Karaurus— primitive salamander

Amphibian to reptile

Proterogyrinus
Limnoscelis
Tseajaia
Solenodonsaurus
Hylonomus
Paleothyris

Early Reptile to Turtle

Captorhinus
Scutosaurus
Odontochelys Semitestacea— partial formation of a turtle shell, showing how the hard underbelly, or plastron, formed first.
Deltavjatia vjatkensis
Proganochelys

Early reptile to diapsid (dinosaurs and modern reptiles except for turtle)

Hylonomus
Paleothyris
Petrolacosaurus
Araeoscelis
Apsisaurus
Claudiosaurus
Planocephalosaurus
Protorosaurus
Prolacerta
Proterosuchus
Hyperodapedon
Trilophosaurus
Reptile to mammal

Paleothyris
Protoclepsydrops haplous
Clepsydrops
Archaeothyris
Varanops
Haptodus
Dimetrodon
Sphenacodon
Biarmosuchia
Procynosuchus
Dvinia
Thrinaxodon
Cynognathus
Diademodon
Probelesodon
Probainognathus
Exaeretodon
Oligokyphus
Kayentatherium
Pachygenelus
Diarthrognathus
Adelobasileus cromptoni
Sinoconodon
Kuehneotherium
Eozostrodon
Morganucodon— a transition between “mammal-like reptiles” and “true mammals”.
Haldanodon
Peramus
Endotherium
Kielantherium
Aegialodon
Steropodon galmani
Vincelestes neuquenianus
Pariadens kirklandi
Kennalestes
Asioryctes
Cimolestes
Procerberus
Gypsonictops

Dinosaur to bird

Allosaurus—A large therapod with a wishbone
Coelophysis
Compsognathus—A small coeleosaur with a wishbone
Eoraptor
Epidendrosaurus
Herrerasaurus
Ceratosaurus
Compsognathus
Sinosauropteryx
Protarchaeopteryx
Caudipteryx
Velociraptor
Deinonychus
Oviraptor
Sinovenator
Beipiaosaurus
Lisboasaurus
Sinornithosaurus
Microraptor— a feathered bird with distinctly dinosaurian characteristics, such as its tail.
Xiaotingia— slightly earlier than Archaeopteryx, slightly more like a dinosaur and less like a bird
Archaeopteryx— the famous bird-with-teeth.
Rahonavis
Confuciusornis
Sinornis
Patagopteryx
Ambiortus
Hesperornis
Apsaravis
Ichthyornis
Columba— One of many typical modern birds

Cetaceans

Indohyus— a vaguely chevrotain-like or raccoon-like aquatic artiodactyl ungulate with an inner ear identical to that of
whales.
Ambulocetus— an early whale that looks like a mammalian version of a crocodile
Pakicetus— an early, semi-aquatic whale, a superficially wolf-like animal believed to be a direct ancestor of modern whales.
Rhodocetus— An early whale with comparatively large hindlegs: not only represents a transition between semi-aquatic
whales, like Ambulocetus, and obligately aquatic whales, like Basilosaurus.
Basilosaurus— A large, elongated whale with vestigial hind flippers: transition from early marine whales (likeRhodocetus) to
modern whales
Dorudon— A small whale with vestigial hind flippers, close relative of Basilosaurus.