adele-bloch-bauer's-portrait

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When I first read this morning that Eurovision superstar Conchita Wurst had been styled by Jean Paul Gaultier as Klimt’s Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer, and photographed by Ellen von Unwerth, I assumed it was an April Fools’ joke; but I was so very wrong. For those of you who haven’t seen the image, taken to promote the upcoming Aids Life Ball, please enjoy this pretty spectacular project.

Source

Gustav Klimt, Portrait of Adele Block-Bauer I. 1907, oil and gold leaf on canvas. Neue Art Gallery, New York, New York, United States.

Great painting with a great story:

This painting, which took three years to complete, was commissioned by the wealthy industrialist Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer, who made his money in the sugar industry. Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer favored the arts, especially Klimt, and commissioned him to complete another portrait of his wife Adele in 1912. Adele Bloch-Bauer was the only person to be painted twice by Klimt. This painting is perhaps most famous not for its artistic quality, but because of its scandalous history since inception. Upon her death, Adele Bloch-Bauer wished the painting to be given to the Austrian State Gallery, but it was seized by advancing German forces in World War II. In 1945, Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer designated the paintings to be the property of his nephew and nieces, including Maria Altmann. Nonetheless, the Austrian government retained ownership of the painting, and was not returned to the Altmann family until 2006 after a long court battle. The painting was then sold at auction for $135 million dollars, which at that time was the highest price paid at auction for a painting. It is now displayed the Neue Art Gallery in New York.

Gustav Klimt - Portrait of Adele-Bloch Bauer I. (1907)

- This painting, which took three years to complete, was commissioned by the wealthy industrialist Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer, who made his money in the sugar industry. Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer favored the arts, especially Klimt, and commissioned him to complete another portrait of his wife Adele in 1912. Adele Bloch-Bauer was the only person to be painted twice by Klimt. This painting is perhaps most famous not for its artistic quality, but because of its scandalous history since inception. Upon her death, Adele Bloch-Bauer wished the painting to be given to the Austrian State Gallery, but it was seized by advancing German forces in World War II. In 1945, Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer designated the paintings to be the property of his nephew and nieces, including Maria Altmann. Nonetheless, the Austrian government retained ownership of the painting, and was not returned to the Altmann family until 2006 after a long court battle. The painting was then sold at auction for $135 million dollars, which at that time was the highest price paid at auction for a painting.

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Adele Bloch-Bauer by Gustav Klimt - 1912

Adele Bloch-Bauer was born in Vienna on August 9, 1881, the youngest daughter of the seven children of the banker Moritz Bauer and Jeannette Bauer née Honig. Her father was the general director of the influential Viennese Bank association and the president of the Orient railway company. 

 Adele married relatively young. On December 19, 1899, she married the industrialist Ferdinand Bloch.  Adele and Ferdinand had no children. In 1917, both couples added the wives’ maiden name to the family name: Bloch-Bauer.

More here…

http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/bloch-bauer-adele

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the beauty industry and the cosmetics it churns out so frequently aren’t always frivolous. case in point: aerin lauder felt so inspired by gustav klimt’s “portrait of adele bloch-bauer” that she designed two [semi-boring shades of (sorry, i’m just being honest)] lipsticks for neue galerie, which opens an exhibition of the painter’s works—including ‘the lady in gold’ on april 2nd. the limited edition duo will be available in the museum’s shop with proceeds benefitting educational programming.

Donne e Arte.

“La ragazza con l’orecchino di perla”, Vermeer.

“Adele Bloch-Bauer’s Portrait“, Klimt.

“Donna con cappello (madame Matisse)”, di Henry Matisse.

“Madonna”, di Munch.

“La dama con l’ermellino”, Leonardo Da Vinci.

“Acrobata”, Chagall.

“Ritratto di una giovane donna”, Modigliani.

"The Dancer," Helen Mirren’s favorite Klimt

Mirren will soon be gracing movie screens in “The Woman in Gold,” which recounts how a Jewish refugee (played by Mirren) forced the Austrian government to restitute Klimt’s famous Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I. But Mirren recently revealed to the New Yorker that she actually prefers “The Dancer,” which the Galerie St. Etienne first exhibited and sold in 1959. Both The Dancer and Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I are now at the Neue Galerie.

(Image: Gustav Klimt, The Dancer, 1916-18, private collection, courtesy Neue Galerie, New York.)