a:tle

Here’s a doodle of Cassiope Blake. Her family is originally from South Korea (from her mother’s side) and her Mother is the CEO of a big fashion company (specialized in monster fitting brands) who settled in London with her husband and two daughters. Cassiope was born as a gorgon and takes great pride in it. She’s the little queen of the Academy, and by queen I mean ‘perfect angel looking bossing around’ girl. She has it all, wits & good looks and that might have seemed unfair to most people if she wasn’t one of the sneakiest little vixen around. She easily manipulates her other classmates to get what she wants and she’s not afraid to say it. In the end, she’s a very driven young lady who will eventually save the day, you just wait.

2

So. Abigail is the well respected (and feared) headmistress of the Academy. She’s a Harpy, and I’m not sure it shows on those two paintings but she has greenish skin. She’s a very classy lady that you don’t want to piss of. She has little faith in our heroes, as they are ‘uncivilized goons’ barely good enough for detention. Deep down, she harbors some sort of fondness for the little rascals, but she might as well never show it.

Research discovers link between epilepsy and autism

Our researchers have found a previously undiscovered link between epileptic seizures and the signs of autism in adults.

Dr SallyAnn Wakeford from the Department of Psychology revealed that adults with epilepsy were more likely to have higher traits of autism and Asperger syndrome.

Characteristics of autism, which include impairment in social interaction and communication as well as restricted and repetitive interests, can be severe and go unnoticed for many years, having tremendous impact on the lives of those who have them.

The research found that epileptic seizures disrupt the neurological function that affects social functioning in the brain resulting in the same traits seen in autism.

Dr Wakeford said: “The social difficulties in epilepsy have been so far under-diagnosed and research has not uncovered any underlying theory to explain them. This new research links social difficulties to a deficit in somatic markers in the brain, explaining these characteristics in adults with epilepsy.”

Dr Wakeford and her colleagues discovered that having increased autistic traits was common to all epilepsy types, however, this was more pronounced for adults with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE).

The researchers suggest that one explanation may be because anti-epileptic drugs are often less effective for TLE. The reason why they suspect these drugs are implicated is because they were strongly related to the severity of autistic characteristics.

Dr Wakeford carried out a comprehensive range of studies with volunteers with epilepsy and discovered that all of the adults with epilepsy showed autism traits.

She said: “It is unknown whether these adults had a typical developmental period during childhood or whether they were predisposed to having autistic traits before the onset of their epilepsy. However what is known is that the social components of autistic characteristics in adults with epilepsy may be explained by social cognitive differences, which have largely been unrecognised until now.”

Dr Wakeford said the findings could lead to improved treatment for people with epilepsy and autism. She said: “Epilepsy has a history of cultural stigma, however the more we understand about the psychological consequences of epilepsy the more we can remove the stigma and mystique of this condition.

“These findings could mean that adults with epilepsy get access to better services, as there is a wider range of treatments available for those with autism condition.”

Margaret Rawnsley, research administration officer at Epilepsy Action welcomed the findings.

She said: “We welcome any research that could further our understanding of epilepsy and ultimately improve the lives of those with the condition. This research has the potential to tell us more about the links between epilepsy and other conditions, such as autism spectrum disorders.”

Early 2010.

This was a cover for the first stab I took at this story.  That early draft had a lot of this dream symbolism going on where people visually experienced their emotions.  If someone were “drowning in grief” they would literally become just soaked in water to the point of drowning. If someones heart were broken, they could literally open their chest and show other people where it was cracked apart.  Of course, here I think it’s pretty clear that the figure on the cover had a heart that was “burning”, though whether it was in passion or rage was not meant to be clear.  

I still really like this cover (at least the idea if not the actual drawing) and concept.  It doesn’t work for the comic as it is now, but I may return to it one day. 

Also…I am so, unbelievably, impossibly, utterly sorry for that font.  I was young!  I didn’t know what I was doing!!!

Just 7 more days until The Light Eaters debuts my lovelies!  Enjoy!  :)

Happy New Year!

Hi dear readers and LT Lovers,

I wanted to take a moment to thank you for such an amazing year despite the scarcity of posts on the blog. We still had many readers and viewers accessing the site to read old posts and fan fiction stories. On behalf of the blog, I would like to wish you all a very prosperous and joyful new year. With this note holds a promise that I will be finishing The Last Emperors fan fiction and for anyone who appreciate my writing, there is something very special (and gratuitous) in store for you.
Sending you all lots of love and light on this wonderful Tuesday.

Jolie Adam (Jo Lee)

Writing problem #248

In the daytime, I am too tired from not sleeping the night before, so I can’t write much.

In the nighttime, I am trying to train myself to sleep at night, so I can’t write much.

I am not only hypergraphic but the entire package – compulsive creativity, i’ve heard it called Dostoyevsky’s Syndrome but I’ve also heard it called other things (and I’ve heard other things called Dostoyevsky’s syndrome).  It’s often associated with temporal lobe epilepsy.  And if I can’t create, including write, I feel horrible all the time.

So I end up breaking down and creating when I shouldn’t, which makes me feel lousy from lack of sleep. Or I end up sleeping when I should, which makes me feel lousy from lack of creativity.  (I create best at night because  it’s the only time of day I can guarantee to be alone, but can still get help in 5 minutes at the touch of a button or the tripping of a number of different safety alarms throughout the house.)

This is why I want:

  • A 36-hour day 
  • That my circadian clock, such as I have, is actually attuned to (which it isn’t, now)
  • 12 hours daytime, 24 hours nighttime, half of night for creativity, half for sleep.
Truthful Tuesday: Good Cause Edition

Anyone who’s been following me for awhile will know why I’m posting this. For those who don’t, my boyfriend Jeraimee has been living with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) for more than ten years. 

Like so many others, his day consists of suppressing and ignoring hallucinations of voices, music, people, smells, or tastes that may occur. These features are called “auras” or “warnings.” They may last for just a few seconds, or may continue as long as a minute or two. The experiences during temporal lobe seizures vary in intensity and quality. Sometimes the seizures are so mild that the person barely notices. In other cases, the person may be consumed with fright, intellectual fascination, or even pleasure. Jer’s seizures usually take on the appearance of daydreaming or staring off into space and he will often be mildly confused or distracted when it ends.

About 40% to 80% of people with TLE also perform repetitive, automatic movements (called automatisms), such as lip smacking and rubbing the hands together. Three-quarters of people with TLE also have simple partial seizures, in which they remain fully conscious. Some people have only simple partial seizures and never have a change in consciousness. 

Fortunately, in recent months Jer’s seizures have been reduced greatly due to a drastic change in diet. He has stopped drinking diet sodas that contain aspartame and is now following a ketogenic diet that many doctors prescribe for children who are unresponsive to seizure meds. I barely even notice his seizures anymore.  I’m so proud of him for putting such effort into his lifestyle change and really sticking to it. When he puts his mind to it, he is unstoppable. I’m in awe of his determination.

Jeraimee has decided to participate in the 2013 Epilepsy Walk, in March.  It’s only been a week and he has already reached 35% of his fundraising goal. It would mean so much to me if any of you were able to help him reach his goal of $500. The money will go directly to the Epilepsy Foundation of Florida.

To make a donation, click here 

THANK YOU in advance for any help you guys can offer. Please reblog at will. 

NOTE: Portions of this post contains excerpts from this site, where you can learn more about this type of epilepsy. 

 

Moments ago, I found an official announcement pinned to my door with a dagger.  This is news from the higher-ups. 

The Light Eaters will debut on December 25th, 2013.  As a special gift to you, my new readers, the entire first chapter will debut on that day.  Subsequent updates will switch to a once weekly schedule after that.  In the meantime, I’ll be posting up development illustrations and concept art every few days. :)

I’ll convey more information to you as it becomes available to me…hopefully not in the form of papers stuck to my door with daggers.