The-Music-Snobs

roxy-and-the-striders asked:

any England head cannons?

  • England use to be such a music snob and say things like ‘you can’t be punk if you don’t listen to classic rock’ but he realised how stupid he sounds and stopped.
  • He gets a migraine every time his way of spelling colour or flavour etc. is underlined in red.
  • On the Battle of Waterloo anniversary, when the euro-star enters Waterloo Intentional train station, England gathers Prussia, Germany, and the Netherlands to welcome France with ‘We won’ banners and a very smug Englishmen.
  • England may of won something as petty as a game of snap a century ago but he never forgets and never fails to remind others too.
  • He is really a genuinely nice person to have tea in the afternoon with though. Even Scotland and Ireland get along with him in then.
  • He makes it his duty to regularly visit all past colonies if they allow him over.
  • Although his cooking isn’t the best in the world he can make a damn good BBQ.

Here’s Fall Out Boy’s Induction speech for Green Day:

Patrick Stump: So let me ask everybody a question — what is punk rock? Now that should seem like a simple enough question to answer, but kids and critics argue with fervor and furious devotion, religious sects and political parties…Star Wars fans…so, I guarantee you that someone, somewhere will be very pissed off when I say this, but what’s more punk rock than pissing people off? What I’m saying is that one of my all time favorite punk bands is Green Day.
So, I remember the first time I heard Green Day. Give you a little background…I was a little bit of a music snob when I was a kid. My dad was a Chicago folk singer and he was very psyched to see all the punk bands of the day. And he played a lot of fusion jazz when I was younger, so you can imagine I was pretty upset with my friends who were punk fans. So one day some friends got me to sneak out of class, and mostly we just went home and listened to this cassette tape that one of them had…it was Dookie. So the thing that struck me right off the bat was how musical it was. It was all the things that you’d expect from punk rock, it was angry, it was loud, it was fast, but there were these subtle overtones of awareness of music theory and music history that was wise beyond its years. Now, other kids had Guns N’ Roses and Nirvana and all those things later. 1994, none of that was good. This, this one I was like, “this is mine.”
After that, I was all over it. I tried to dress like them, I tried to play my dad’s music real low like Billie Joe did. I followed every interview, I watched every TV performance…and the more immersed into the world I got, the more I thought that this band was one of the greatest. You have to think to yourself, “Wow, how’d they get all these guys in one band together?” Now, the thing that kills me is sometimes you have that point in your life where you think, “Yeah, they should maybe be in the fall of fame but ah…maybe not everyone’s pulling their weight.” Maybe you see one guy and, “Ah, he’s cool but…maybe he just the maybe he just drove the van.” But with Green Day, every player, every sound that came out of these three guys was as important to the entire thing, including the one guy.
Billie Joe’s singing and strong, sarcastic lyrics that totally…those bright, open chord structures…the way he played guitar. Mike Dirnt! And those bass lines…up there with the lights of James Jamerson and Jaco Pastorius, identified the bass players in the history of his playing. Tré Cool…your drummer is Tré fucking Cool. That is the coolest thing ever. And there’s not a drummer under the age of 30 who didn’t spend their entire summer trying to learn…to play that rabid fire build at the beginning of “Basket Case” just like Tré. And guess what? No one can. The passion, he makes it look easy. It’s incredible.
Pete Wentz: Now, no one else can do anything the way Green Day does. I have this distinct memory of Billie Joe. He was interviewing at MTV somewhere around the album Nimrod, where he said something along the lines of, “I don’t want to be making punk rock the rest of my life.” Sorry man, you still are.
When you followed up Dookie with a single about methamphetamine, and another in two movements, that was pretty punk rock.
When conventional wisdom demanded another fast rock punk song and instead you put down a stripped down ballad single that became the go-to prom song for a decade, that was pretty punk rock.
When you put out three companion albums in a year — in an era of digital singles — that was pretty punk rock.
When you put out an acoustic folk album at a time when you were fooled by obviously Green Day-inspired pop-punk, that was pretty punk rock.
When in an era of basically no socially conscious discourse in pop music, you put out a scathingly political rock opera and somehow managed to make that career-redefining, that was insanely fucking punk rock. Not to mention you’re alleged involvement in side projects like the Network and Foxboro Hot Tubs.
Everything you guys do is punk rock in the sense that you’ve gone for the easy route…the obvious route, the safe route. You’ve never repeated yourselves, you’ve never done anything to please suites. Suites aren’t really pleased by changed, but a brief band plays a set of their hits, there should be a lot of change. Like Queen, the Who or the Clash, the best bands go to defy and define the labels they get savvy with…the best bands are legend on record and onstage.
Now I have to say, the impact that Green Day has had on pop culture…when we walk through an airport, about 80 percent of the time when someone takes a picture with us, we hear them walk off like, “Holy shit, I just got a picture with fucking Green Day!” That’s totally true. Now Fall Out Boy has never for Green Day, and honestly part of us kind of likes it that way. Because Green Day is honestly one of the best live bands on the planet right now. If you’ve ever opened for them, they put on a show that’s so epic and engaging, that the audience forgets about you by the way they’re halfway through the first chorus. If you’ve ever played after them…sorry.
This is a band that’s so in tune with their audience that let a random kid onstage and play in the band, in arenas literally filled who probably daydreamed every kid has playing onstage with their favorite band. That’s not image consultants, cleaver A&R, or media trainee, but by cutting your teeth in community halls and basements in post punk squats. So let some Red feed argue the definition of punk rock. Me, I already have my answer. It is our great honor to induct Green Day into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The Music Snobs // Episode 014: Erykah Badu

The TMS crew + Badu kick things off with an introspective look into the prolific career of Ghostface Killah and discuss the method behind Tony Starks’ mad genius. Then Arthur, Isaac, Jehan, Scoop, and Erykah examine the long history of image within the music industry and try to draw a line between musicians who have used image to improve their art, and those whose image has overshadowed their music. Finally the crew engages in a wild rapid roundtable that poses an interesting question: What is the one song lyric you’d love to actually say in real life…but know you never will?

just listen..

The Music Snobs Break it Down on the Status of Black Music

Last month, I stumbled across this terrific discussion from the Music Snobs about Soul Music and the disappearing Black aesthetic in music. Azealia Banks has recently made us more aware of this dynamic of “cultural smudging” and D'angelo has reasserted just what the Black aesthetic is in music at the end of 2014.

 This Music Snobs conversation was before the infamous Hot 97 interview of Azealia Banks and before the release of D'angelo’s Black Messiah. Which makes it even more compelling. I found the discussion to be well informed and thought provoking so I hope you will give it a listen. You can subscribe to The Music Snobs on Soundcloud.

You want more Badu? We got more Badu. Check out this exclusive, bonus edition of The Music Snobs as Arthur, Isaac, Jehan, and Scoop unveil a previously unreleased segment from their conversation with the legendary Erykah Badu. Together, the Snobs and their guest-Snob dive into a unique round table discussion: If you could change one thing about an artist that you feel is holding them back, what would that thing be? Listen to this bonus episode of The Music Snobs to hear the crew + Erykah Badu discuss the “fatal flaws” of some of their favorite artists.

Nah, no because once I realize that people aren’t really looking for a savior they’re looking for somebody who looks like one, then, anybody can fit that bill. I’m not- thats not my business, I’m not interested in that business. I’m interested in evolving and people who want to evolve along with me can, you know, people who want to critique it can, people who want to use it to write their own pieces and albums and be inspired by it can, people who want to run a tractor over 100 of my CDs can, you know because thats what art is for, its for dialogue, you know the dialogue of whether you like it whether you don’t and to me thats why I do what I do, I do it because I HAVE to, its therapy for me, its how I live…
— 

Erykah Badu’s response to a question on The Music Snobs “Do you find backlash from some of your fan base that has been with you since 97 expecting to see you come out with the headwrap with the drape dress(she says "Yeah definitley” here), do you feel beholden to reach them and try to bring them up through image?“

This is a DAMN good answer to that question that has somehow made me like Badu more than I already did (which is a lot)

Erykah Badu is one of my favorite artists (PERIOD), to this day she still hasn’t released an album that I don’t like, which is saying something because she has been around for a while. Mama’s Gun and Baduzim are my favorite Badu albums.

The quote is from around the 50th minute: https://soundcloud.com/themusicsnobs/episode-014

Erykah Badu Guest Stars on The Music Snobs. The TMS crew + Badu kick things off with an introspective look into the prolific career of Ghostface Killah and discuss the method behind Tony Starks’ mad genius. Then Arthur, Isaac, Jehan, Scoop, and Erykah examine the long history of image within the music industry and try to draw a line between musicians who have used image to improve their art, and those whose image has overshadowed their music. Finally the crew engages in a wild rapid roundtable that poses an interesting question: What is the one song lyric you’d love to actually say in real life…but know you never will?

Get ready for one of the most highly anticipated episodes of The Music Snobs yet, as Erykah Badu joins us long enough to reveal a side of her we guarantee you’ve never seen.

Why does all criticism of AM ends up on songs like No, 1 Party Anthem and Fireside? We all agree that they are flops. What about R U Mine? Arabella? Why do you only call me when you’re high? One for the Road? 2013(bonus track)? They haven’t even changed their sound to drastic measure and these music snobs are losing their shit. Shows how they only like their music because of the image it gives them.

Marvin Gaye’s classic “Let’s Get It On” Album Is Appraised By
The Music Snobs In Honor Of Its 40th Anniversary

Marvin Gaye’s classic Let’s Get It On album is appraised
by The Music Snobs in honor of its 40th anniversary.
The crew of Arthur, Isaac, Scoop and Jehan delve
deep into the album’s expression, influences, &
ramifications towards Motown, soul, R&B,
and Marvin’s own career. The episode is
yours for free download via TMS’
site
, where you can check out
many more entertaining &
insightful episodes.