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The Geometry of Type by Stephen Coles.

The Geometry of Type" explores 100 traditional and modern typefaces in loving detail, with a full spread devoted to each entry. Characters from each typeface are enlarged and annotated to reveal key features, anatomical details, and the finer, often-overlooked elements of type design, which shows how these attributes affect mood and readability. Sidebar information lists the designer and foundry, the year of release and the different weights and styles available, while feature boxes explain the origins and best uses for each typeface, such as whether it is suitable for running text or as a display font for headlines. To help the reader spot each typeface in the wider world, the full character set is shown, and the best letters for identification are highlighted. This beautiful and highly practical work of reference for font spotters, designers and users is a close-up celebration of typefaces and great type design.

There are many things I like about Stephen Coles’ recent book; the bright, clean design and the accessible structure allowing you to dip in and out; but most of all, it’s the lack of fluff or filler. The content has been carefully honed to focus on the important details, which is in fact what the book is all about: the details of each typeface.

In highlighting and comparing the features that give each typeface its character, anyone exploring this subject can begin to make informed choices between similar typeface options.

The pithy descriptions describe each typeface’s origin and advise what makes each appropriate for certain scenarios and where it might fail. These are occasionally laced with a subtle humour that keeps the tone of the book warm.

The great balance of written and visual explanation means the book works well as a quick reference but has a seductive way of drawing you in to read more and examine further.

Book Review by typeworship

Get the book here:

USA: http://amzn.to/1aafkj0
UK: http://amzn.to/18VlHX0

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Book Review: The Geometry of Type

There are many things I like about Stephen Coles’ recent book; the bright, clean design and the accessible structure allowing you to dip in and out; but most of all, it’s the lack of fluff or filler. The content has been carefully honed to focus on the important details, which is in fact what the book is all about: the details of each typeface.

In highlighting and comparing the features that give each typeface its character, anyone exploring this subject can begin to make informed choices between similar typeface options.

The pithy descriptions describe each typeface’s origin and advise what makes each appropriate for certain scenarios and where it might fail. These are occasionally laced with a subtle humour that keeps the tone of the book warm.

The great balance of written and visual explanation means the book works well as a quick reference but has a seductive way of drawing you in to read more and examine further.

The 100 “essential” typefaces chosen covers a decent range and they have been categorised in the most straight-forward way. Historically it stretches from Gill Sans 1928-32) right up to Heron Serif (2012), but also acknowledges original creation dates for revivals such as Bembo (1495).

I’ve already found it useful in my work and I know I’ll enjoy repeatedly picking it up in the future to compare other typefaces in my collection and those I’ve spotted in the wild.

Well worth picking up a copy: The Anatomy of Type

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The Geometry of Type

Thames and Hudson are famous for interesting books, especially when it comes to typography knowledge. Here is the geometry of type written by Stephen Coles and showing you 100 essential typefaces with their anatomy.

About the book

Beginning with the foreword of Erik Spiekermann where he says that this book is the ultimate guide to the intricacies of typeface design. But why? Characters from each typeface are enlarged and annotated to reveal key features, anatomical details, and the finer, often overlooked elements of typeface design. The book shows you the attributes affecting mood and readabilit. Whether you like to use running text or suitable headlines, after reading this book you are one step closer to understand type design.

What gives a typeface personality? Why does one font appear bigger or clearer? How can you perfectly appraise the white space, pounces and the stems?

The answers are quite simple and explained in this book. Facing objective criteria that can male you find the right typeface for the right project can be fun and can solve a lot of problems you are in by having chosen the profession of design.

We highly recommend the book to type enthusiasts and designer who want to dive deeper into the perfect use of typography. The computer can’t answer you the questions, although the fontfaces got more and more better and well proportioned. In the end this book is the best guide for you to be the master of the letters and not let the letters rule your design.

Get it in our Typostrate book shop
Kaufe es in unserem Typostrate Buch Shop

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9

Chromeography: Metal logos and lettering

Over the last couple of years I’ve seen some wonderful chrome lettering pass across my screen from Stephen ColesChromeography site and today I thought I’d share a few of my favourites.

Stephen, who featured in 8 Faces #2 and whose book The Geometry of Type we reviewed on Type worship, has been running the blog on tumblr since 2009. The collection of letters led to an exhibition last year at Mota Italic in Berlin and with it the creation of the Chromeography logo in collaboration with Laura Serra (another 8 Faces contributor ).

The myriad of myriad of lettering and logo are collected from all over the web with some shots by Coles. Not just vintage cars either but cameras, refrigerators, typewriters, and I even spotted a gun.

Images above:

8 Faces: About  | Magazines | Type Worship Blog |

A typeface is like a chair

  • A page is like a room, type is like furniture, and a typeface is like a chair.
  • Chairs and typefaces are designed to fulfill a purpose.
  • The user knows immediately when they aren’t right for the purpose, though they may not be able to explain why.
  • Furniture design and typeface design are crafts.
  • Both crafts require good taste.
  • Both crafts require technical proficiency.
  • For most purposes, both crafts require restraint.
  • A chair or typeface can be decorative to varying degrees but must be functional.
  • The best chairs and typefaces have an appropriate balance of form and function.
  • Very small changes in proportion make a big difference.
  • You can misuse a chair and you can misuse a typeface.
  • Context matters: a lounge chair doesn’t work at a dining table, Papyrus doesn’t work in a business letter.
  • Audience matters: a chair must hold the weight and size of the sitter, a typeface must hold the attention of the reader.
  • Everyone needs them every day.
  • There isn’t a perfect one.

Stephen Coles via Listgeeks

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