Era diversa.
Per sentirsi veramente viva aveva bisogno di qualcosa simile a una poesia.
Una poesia squisitamente erotica.
Un concetto il più vicino possibile a una sensazione carnale.
Non, come accade agli uomini, un’idea che si trasforma in sensazione carnale,
bensì una sensazione carnale che si trasforma in idea,
che prende a rifulgere come un gioiello di carne…
—  Mishima Yukio

Non mi sono mai intossicata di droghe, ma d’amore, di un amore sconsiderato e folle, più simile a un danno che a una cura, a un crepacuore che a un cuore sano. 
L’amore è vivido. 
Non ho mai voluto la versione sbiadita. 
L’amore è forza alla massima potenza. 
Non ho mai voluto la versione diluita. 
Non mi sono mai sottratta all’enormità dell’amore. 

Jeanette Winterson

Era diversa.
Per sentirsi veramente viva aveva bisogno di qualcosa simile a una poesia.
Una poesia squisitamente erotica.
Un concetto il più vicino possibile a una sensazione carnale.
Non, come accade agli uomini, un’idea che si trasforma in sensazione carnale,
bensì una sensazione carnale che si trasforma in idea,
che prende a rifulgere come un gioiello di carne…

Mishima Yukio

5 Tips for Creating Great Metaphors & Similes

Aaaah, metaphors: they can be a writer’s best friend, or worst enemy (see what I did there?). When done well, they can add a whole other dimension to your writing. But you can’t necessarily just compare sadness to road kill and be on your merry way. Metaphor creation is a honed writing skill.

Before we hop to the 5 tips, let’s learn some terminology with the help of our buddy John Green, and our favorite metaphor from Looking for Alaska:

“So I walked back to my room and collapsed on the bottom bunk, thinking that if people were rain, I was drizzle and she was a hurricane.”

The best definition of a metaphor that I could come up with based on others I read was “a comparison that shows how two mostly dissimilar things are alike in a contextually important way”. So though people are not drops of water who fall from the sky, we learn that Miles feels “subdued” compared to Alaska, because we know how drizzle relates to a hurricane.

Metaphors have two parts: a tenor and a vehicle. The tenor is the actual thing being described—in the above quote, people, Miles, and Alaska are tenors. The vehicle is what the tenors are being compared to: rain, drizzle, and a hurricane, respectively.

Okay! Now that we’ve got that down, let’s get this show on the road:

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Northern Wind
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  • City and Colour
  • Little Hell
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You’re the Northern Wind
Sending shivers down my spine
You’re like falling leaves
In an autumn night

You’re the lullaby
That’s singing me to sleep
You are the other half
You’re like the missing piece

Oh my love
Oh my love
Oh my love
You don’t know
What you do to me, to me

You are all four seasons
Rolled into one
Like the cold December snow
In the warm July sun

I’m the jet black sky
That’s just before the rain
Like the mighty current 
Pulling you under the waves

Oh my love
Oh my love
Oh my love
You don’t know what you do to me
To me
I’m the darkest hour
Just before the dawn
And I’m slowly sinking
Into the slough of despond

Like an old guitar
Worn out and left behind
I have stories still to tell
They’re of the healing kind

Oh my love
Oh my love
Oh my love
If I could just 
Find you tonight
If I could just find you tonight
Oh my love

Do do do (5X)

How vulnerable
we would all be if longing
shone through our bodies,

if our skins were translucent
lanterns flushed with yellow flame

leaping in the strange
and unpredictable winds
of our desire, like

the neon Morse code fireflies
use to brazenly flick the night.

—  Lee Ann Roripaugh, section 3 “Lumen” from “Bioluminescence,” in On the Cusp of a Dangerous Year (Southern Illinois University Press, 2009)
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