Our mantra this last weekend was “Loki is a diva” because I would have to get up early to get dressed, required assistance to get in and out of costume, and then hoarded all the attention.

Then I saw this picture that Robert Hyrum Hirschi (thank you!) took at the Cosplay Competition and was all “That’s it, I’m done! He’s such a Diva!”

Do photographs that picture someone who no longer exists recall death, or life? Are all photographs funerary in the sense that they show us something from the past that will never be that way again?
—  Robert Hirsch
8

Ordinary People (1984) - dir. Robert Redford

After a four-month stint in a mental hospital following an attempted suicide, Conrad Jarett (Timothy Hutton) returns home to live with his parents. His father (Donald Sutherland) coddles him too much. His mother (Mary Tyler Moore) lost her favorite son to a boating accident, and has no love left to give. So poor young Conrad seeks help from a psychiatrist (Judd Hirsch) and meets a new girl at school (Elizabeth McGovern). That’s the plot. You know where it’s going to go, but director Robert Redford slowly unravels all of his characters in turn, creating a rather elegant drama.

Ordinary People is too often beaten down simply because it won the Best Picture oscar over Scorsese’s Raging Bull, but it’s a great film. Parts are severely outdated (the editing of the flashback sequences is laughable by today’s standards) but the heart is still there. It’s an emotional movie with Oscar-worthy performances up and down the line.

8.4

10

Hitchcock  recriado:

Jodie Foster em Os Pássaros

Scarlett Johansson e Javier Bardem em Janela Indiscreta

Marion Cottilardem Psicose

Naomi Watts em Marnie

Keira Knightley e Jennifer Jason Leigh em Rebecca

Seth Rogen em Intriga Internacional

Tang Wei, Josh Brolin, Casey Affleck, Eva Marie Saint, Ben Foster, Omar Metwally e Julie Christie em Um Barco e Nove Destinos

Gwyneth Paltrow e Robert Downey Jr. em Ladrão de Casaca

Emile Hirsch e James McAvoy em Pacto Sinistro

Charlize Theron em Disque M para Matar

Robert Cornelius (1809-1893), the inventer of the Hipstamatic daguerrotype, was a pioneer in the human expression of stylish alienation and brooding ennui[1]. As his 1839 self-portrait attests, for as long as photographs have existed humans been poppin our collars.
—  Robert Hirsch, Seizing the Light: A History of Photography, entry on Robert Cornelius, McGraw-Hill, 2000
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