This is the recording of Daniele Watts being approached by the police.I’m so mad because I felt so bad for her but the police didnt even come to arrest her they just needed to check her ID to follow up on a complaint, but she decided to be an asshole and made it worse for herself. and while she throws a temper tantrum her boyfriend has a whole casual convo with the cops. No one is mad but her.I feel lied to !!!

Watch on c0n0r0berst.tumblr.com

what have I made

Founding Fathers of Hard-Boiled Crime.  This week, we’re taking a look at the creators of the tough and gritty genre of Hard-Boiled Crime Fiction. Dashielle Hammett, Carroll John Daly and Raymond Chandler wrote raw, sparse stories of brave private-eyes that solved cases and caught crooks through perseverance, guns, shady accomplices, and wisecracks. Read on here.

The Open Textbook Challenge

Each year US college students spend about $1,000 on textbooks.

The Saylor Foundation wants to change this by providing free and open textbooks that can be used throughout an undergraduate education. 

To do so they’ve launched the Open Textbook Challenge and offer $20,000 prizes to authors who create Creative Commons licensed textbooks in topics ranging from art history to business management to mechanical engineering. 

For authors, the next round of grants and prizes closes May 31. Information about submitting material is here.

For students, petition your professors (and schools) to start using these materials.

Image: Screenshot from Elementary Linear Algebra (PDF) from Open Textbook Challenge winner Kenneth Kuttler of Brigham Young University.

2
The algorithm that won an Oscar

Hollywood likes a good explosion.  Now, with the help of an open source algorithm called Wavelet Turbulence, filmmakers can digitally create pyrotechnics that were formerly time-consuming and difficult to control.

UCSB’s Theodore Kim (along with three collaborators) picked up the Academy Award in Technical Achievement for Wavelet Turbulence. The algorithm uses a theory of turbulence developed in the 1940s by Russian mathematician Andrey Kolmogorov.

So far, it has been used in over 26 major hollywood productions including Avatar, Sherlock Holmes, Hugo, and Super 8 (pictured above).

Read the full story

Friendly reminder that white men are still walking around with rifles in grocery stores.

image

Kroger is about to become the latest battle ground for the open carry battle after recent demonstrations in Ohio and Texas (of course) caught the attention of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

Related:  Blacks Demand Due Process Before Being Gunned Down in America still gaining no traction.

Read More

TO ALL YOU ASSHOLES USING “YE” AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR “THE” TO MAKE SOMETHING SOUND LIKE OLD ENGLISH I HAVE A FUCKING LESSON FOR YOU

MOSTLY BECAUSE I DON’T THINK YOU FUCKING KNOW WHAT OLD ENGLISH IS BECAUSE YOU ARE REALLY FUCKING IT UP SO SIT THE FUCK DOWN AND TAKE SOME GODDAMNED NOTES

FIRST UP YOU SHOULD KNOW THAT TALKING LIKE SHAKESPEARE ISN’T FUCKING OLD ENGLISH (AND YOU PROBABLY SUCK AS SHAKESPEARE TOO BECAUSE FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THAT IS HOLY “WHEREFORE” DOES NOT MEAN “WHERE” IT MEANS FUCKING “WHY” ) THAT SHIT IS MODERN ENGLISH OLD ENGLISH DOESN’T EVEN FUCKING LOOK LIKE ENGLISH 90% OF THE TIME

NOW I COULD GO ON AND ON ABOUT ANGLO SAXON RUNES AND SHIT BUT WE’RE GONNA FOCUS ON THIS FUCKER RIGHT HERE BECAUSE I DON’T FEEL LIKE WRITING A GODDAMNED NOVEL

image

THAT RIGHT THERE IS A GODDAMNED THORN. IT MAKES THE “TH” SOUND. 

NOW OLD ENGLISH HAD MORE FUCKING LETTERS THAN WE HAVE TODAY, BUT THE FIRST PRINTING PRESS WAS MADE IN GERMANY (AND IF YOU DON’T KNOW THIS YOU NEED TO GO GET HIT BY A TRUCK FILLED WITH A HUNDRED COCKS AND KNOWLEDGE

SO WHEN THEY WERE PRINTING SHIT THEY NOTICED “SHIT MAN WE DON’T HAVE THIS RUNE” AND THAT WAS SORT OF A PROBLEM BECAUSE THE “TH” SOUND IS ACTUALLY KIND OF A BIG THING 

THEY DECIDED “WELL HEY THE ‘Y’ KIND OF LOOKS LIKE THE THORN, SO LETS USE THAT.”

THEY COULD HAVE GONE AND ADDED THE THORN BUT THEY DIDN’T THINK PEOPLE HUNDREDS OF YEARS FROM THEN WOULD BE COMPLETE FUCKTRUCKS AND NOT REALIZE THEY WERE SUBSTITUTING THE ‘Y’ FOR TWO LETTERS 

BASICALLY IT’S THE SAME FUCKING THING AS WRITING “4” INSTEAD OF “FOR” AND PEOPLE SOMEHOW FUCKING FORGOT THIS 

SO AFTER THIS IF YOU HEAR SOMEONE USING THE WORD “YE” TO SOUND MEDIEVAL I WANT YOU TO TAKE THEM BY THE HAIR AND SUBMERGE THEM IN A TANK FILLED WITH HYDROCHLORIC ACID AND TAKE A FEW DEEP BREATHS 

Watch on yasboogie.tumblr.com

Andre Benjamin Embodys Jimi Hendrix In First Clip From Biopic ‘All Is By My Side’

Open Road and XLrator picked up U.S. rights to Andre Benjamin’s Jimi Hendrix project,All Is By My Side, another high-profile film based on the life of a real-life person that’s been burdened with controversy since it started production, which made its World Premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival last fall, and will make its USA premiere at the upcoming SXSW Film Festival this month.

In brief, this is the Hendrix project that didn’t have the approval of Jimi Hendrix’s estate to use any of the musician’s original songs, with reps for the estate accusing the filmmakers of moving forward with the project without their official permission. 

Thus the film is free of all Hendrix-written classics like Purple Haze or The Wind Cries Mary, because of rights issues, and the producers set the film in “Hendrix’s pre-fame era,” as they said, and the music used are covers of other musicians’ songs Hendrix performed.

The feature film is written and directed by John Ridley, who’s been at the center of some alleged dispute with his 12 Years A Slave director, Steve McQueen.

Zeba reviewed it post its TIFF screening, and, in short, she wasn’t impressed. Read her reactions HERE.

Open Road hasn’t set a release date yet, but they have unveiled some first look footage at the film today - a clip featuring Hendrix and Linda Keith (played by Imogen Poots) having an intimate chat. Keith was the girlfriend of Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards who played a part in Hendrix’s early success.

I can’t believe I haven’t seen a 100k post about this on tumblr yet. This could seriously affect every internet user, especially if you watch Netflix and Youtube and shop on any site that isn’t’ Amazon. 

Net neutrality explained. Will you have to pay more for Netflix, or a fee to be able to stream YouTube videos at full speed?

(CNN) — How would you like to have to pay a fee to be able to stream YouTube videos at full speed? What if you liked downloading music from, say, Last.fm or Soundcloud, but those sites suddenly became infinitely slower than bigger sites like Amazon or iTunes?

Those are the kind of major changes to the Internet some folks are envisioning after a federal court ruling this week on what’s come to be called “net neutrality.”

This stuff can get really confusing, with all the government jargon, Internet lingo and competing arguments mixed up in it.

But it’s also really important and could rework the Web as we know it — like allowing the hypothetical situations above become realities.

Here’s a breakdown of what this week’s ruling could mean to you.

What is “net neutrality?”

Generally speaking, when folks talk about neutrality, they’re referring to the ideas that led to a set of rules the Federal Communications Commission approved in 2010. The point of the rules was to keep the companies that hold the keys to the Web from playing favorites.

The “open Internet” rules prevent Internet service providers from blocking or “unreasonably discriminating” against any legal website or other piece of online content.

The philosophy behind it all, preached vociferously by Web activists, is that, in 2014, Internet access is a human right. Denying access, even in part, or giving preferential treatment to one user over another, violates that right, they say.

(The term itself was coined by Columbia law professor Tim Wu.)

What happened this week?

A federal appeals court ruled on Tuesday that the FCC doesn’t have the right to enforce those rules. The court said that the government is tasked with overseeing crucial utilities like telephone service and electricity, but that the Internet isn’t considered to be one of those utilities under current law.

The decision harks back to statements and decisions made by the FCC and other government agencies in the early 2000s, when molasses-slow dial-up connections were the norm and Web access wasn’t nearly as common or, some would say, necessary as it is today.

The FCC has suggested it will appeal the ruling.

So what?

Everybody who accesses the Internet does so through an Internet service provider. And these providers have been pushing for the ability to dole out that access to us on their own terms.

What does that mean? For one, companies like Verizon, who sued the FCC over the rules, would be able to pick and choose who gets the best access.

So, for example, they might start charging big fees for websites to get in the “fast lane.” Those fees presumably would be no problem for the Web’s monster moneymakers but tougher to take for the little guys.

Then, all of a sudden, you’re starting to get two Internets — a quick, smooth highway for the major players and a slow, bumpy trail for everybody else.

The providers could also just blatantly play favorites. So imagine AT&T, a major provider, making traffic quicker on the websites of smartphone companies that use its mobile service and slower on the sites of phone makers who don’t. We’re not saying they’d do that, of course. But, theoretically, they could.

Has this ever actually happened?

In 2007, Comcast started blocking some peer-to-peer networks — the kind customers use to transfer data-heavy files like entire movies and the like.

The FCC ordered them to stop. Comcast sued the FCC. An appeals court ultimately sided with the FCC, but by that time, the backlash had been enough for Comcast to quit on its own (after paying $16 million to settle a lawsuit, that is).

For what its worth, the Web’s major service providers put out statements Tuesday saying they don’t have plans to change anything based on the court’s decision. Of course, it would probably be bad business to make a multimillion-dollar move before the case has played itself all the way out to the Supreme Court, which is where this one might ultimately be decided.

What’s the argument against the rules?

The service providers and their supporters essentially say this is a free-enterprise issue. They say they provide a service and, therefore, should be able to decide how to deliver it and how they charge customers for it.

When the FCC approved net neutrality on a 3-2 party-line vote, Commissioner Robert McDowell, one of two Republicans who opposed it, called the vote a “radical step.”

"Nothing is broken in the Internet-access market that needs fixing," he said at the time.

Randal Milch, a Verizon executive vice president, said in a statement that Tuesday’s ruling “struck down rules that limited the ability of broadband providers to offer new and innovative services to their customers.”

Bottom line — could it cost me money?

It’s possible.

If providers start charging a premium to websites for services, you can bet those sites will turn around and pass the cost on to their customers.

Netflix, whose movie streaming is one of the Internet’s biggest bandwidth hogs, already took a ding to its stock price after the court ruled. The presumption by some investors was that providers are most likely to charge more to sites like Netflix that use so much data.

For fee-based services like Netflix, it’s hard to imagine monthly fees not increasing if their cost of doing business increases. And while it’s obviously all still speculation, it’s possible that currently free services like Google-owned YouTube — which already offers paid subscriptions — could adopt adopt more pay models to make up the difference.

What’s next?

The ruling wasn’t a complete blasting of the FCC’s position. In fact, it said the body still has the right to make rules for the Web, so the commission could possibly try again with a new set of rules.

Congress could settle the issue once and for all with a new, clearly worded law. And there’s always the Supreme Court if the FCC does, in fact, decide to appeal.

Things you did not know VLC Media Player could do

As howtogeek.com puts it, VLC Media Player is the Swiss Army Knife of all media players,  with over 100 million downloads and with it’s new release for android last June 13- we users would want to know what VLC has in store for us. While there are many, here are 7 that appealed to me most and hopefully to you as well.

  1. Convert Media Files -  ctrl+R or media>Convert/Save
    Choose the media file you want to convert, input where you want to save the output file, choose the output file, then convert.
  2. Watch Videos on your Network or over the Internet (such as youtube, vimeo, and vine) - ctrl+N or media>Open Network Stream
    Simply paste the URL of the video you’d want to watch. You can also stream torrent files if you have a decent connection at work/home.
  3. Record your desktop - media>Convert/Save>Capture Device>Select Desktop as capture device>Input Destination>Alter Settings>Press Start.
    You can use this to record a video of your desktop while creating a program then use it after with a voice over (helpful if you are doing tutorials and demos), or use this in conjunction with VLC’s stream feature to do a live stream over the network/Internet.
  4. Do a live stream of your Desktop - ctrl+S or media>Stream>Capture Device>Select Desktop as Capture Device>Choose HTTP if you’re streaming via HTTP>StreamThis is useful if you want to teach someone over the internet things you normally do on your desktop. There’s a similar feature in skype whether you can ‘share screens’ but it has lower resolution compared to VLC’s stream.
  5. Internet Radio - Click on Playlists>Icecast Radio Directory>On the search bar, search for anything you want to listen to.
    his most especially helpful to us anime fans who like to listen to Internet radio but have no means to pay for a service.
  6. Podcasts - Playlists>Podcasts>Add Podcasts
    Listen to podcasts without having to install additional software.
  7. Effects! - ctrl+E or Tools>Effects
    You can do almost anything from audio editing to video editing, you just have to be imaginative. If there are tweaks you’d want to learn, google is your friend.

——-

You can download VLC Media Player here.

image

image

sources: 1, 2.

Text
Photo
Quote
Link
Chat
Audio
Video