Legendary Dutch conductor William Mengelberg’s score of the Fourth Symphony by Gustav Mahler, with both his and the composer’s notes. One of the annotations – in Mahler’s hand at the bottom of the page – indicates that the introduction of the famous, lilting first theme should be played like a Viennese waltz. This and other tempo markings, corrections and musical indications have proven to be critical to our understanding of this piece [not to mention to the modern performing edition].

Mengelberg was one of Mahler’s foremost advocates and invited him to Amsterdam numerous times to present his work at Concertgebouw. One of those visits, in 1904, was the occasion for a special double performance of the Fourth from which this score dates. Here are Mahler and Mengelberg two years later, with conductor and composer Alphonse Diepenbrock on the right:

In 1939 Mengeberg recorded the Fourth Symphony with Concertgebouw, a performance which remains one of the most intriguing Mahler readings I’ve heard. Download it [zip, 105mb].

anonymous asked:

Hello! I'd like to start listening to some classical composers and I was wondering if you'd mind giving a few links to pieces that are good for starting with. It can be anything, really, but I'm interested in Shostakovich and composers like him. Thanks, and I always enjoy seeing your posts on my dash!

hello!! im glad that you like, want to try listening to some of this stuff, but i fear that you’ve asked the wrong person because i am extremely biased towards 20th century and late romantic (so you know, 1860s onwards) kinda classical music BUT I WILL TRY TO BE DIVERSE OK. shostakovich is down in the 20th century section if you wanna skip everything else :)

  • baroque 1600s - 1750s - ok so i listen to like 0 baroque era but anyway,

    • bach is literally the king of baroque music so there’s always heaps of bach around you can listen to, probably his most famous ones include his well-tempered clavier, art of fugue, brandenburg concertos and i could go on tbh. 
    • vivaldi was also another dude who wrote the four seasons, but he’s also got 12 violin concertos which i guess are worth listening, but i know like 2 baroque pieces so im not the best to ask about this era
    • handel - i don’t remember ever listening to any handel woops but have a look here
    • scarlatti - same with scarlatti, but im pretty sure all he did was piano sonatas so you know go nuts
  • classical 1750s - 1830s - mozart, haydn, gluck and beethoven are your main guys here, sometimes schubert is included in this era but sometimes argued into the romantic era (i think so), but yeah, i don’t listen to this era much as well
  • romantic 1820s - 1910s - ahh things start to get interesting here, it’s my second favourite era.
  • 20th century/modern - 1900s - present. my favourite era, probably yours too if you’re looking into shostakovich and friends! im not going to get into present-day classical music because there’s just so much! also im gonna be biased and put my favourite composers here:
    • shostakovich - as you mentioned, you’re interested in shostakovich. he’s best known in his symphonies. for starters, listen to no 5, no 7 and no 11, they’re his main symphonies, and go on from there! they are long, and that’s the thing about 20th century/modern music, things start to get BIG. he’s also got piano concerto no 1 and no 2a cello concerto, and 15 string quartets which are all worth a listen, but his most famous one i think is no 8. there’s a lot of shostakovich!
    • mahler - kinda earlier than shostakovich, he influenced shostakovich a fair bit. mahler has like ten symphonies. i think no 5 is his famous one, but no 6 is quite famous as well (probably because of the hammer), and i also like no 3, but they can be so long. otherwise i haven’t listened to anything else by mahler besides his symphonies (also try symphony no 1 mvt 3, frere jacques as a funeral march!)
    • debussy - although a bit before 20th century, he was an impressionist and i love impressionism music, it can be so calming and harmonious. he was really good with solo piano, like his pour le piano and estampes are just out of this world ohmfgyod and all his preludes (especially cathedrale engloutie), and some of his orchestral work is gorgeous like la mer and images for orchestra and aaahhh debussy!!
    • gershwin - he only left us with a little bit of music but it’s really great as it is. he was like this bridge between classical and jazz, so it’s quite interesting to listen to some of his pieces like rhapsody in blue, an american in paris, concerto in f and cuban overture (listen to that it’s so cool) for orchestral works and also solo piano works like three preludes, and an opera, but not how you’re typical kind, porgy and bess
    • prokofiev - his music is very unique to me. i wouldn’t really know what to start you off with him, i guess like dance of the knights, or symphony no 5, but he’s got awesome piano concertos, with no 3 being the most famous, but also try his other ones.
    • ravel is known for bolero and that’s it. his piano concerto is good, and the string quartet in f is also worth a go
    • other great 20th century composers: bartok, britten, vaughan williams, sibelius, barber, poulenc, satie, ligeti, janacek, lutoslawski, stravinsky, shall i continue? this is where music gets interesting, listen to them you’ll hear some of them sound completely different! that’s why i don’t want to list any from the present-era, because there are like 791 different things happening rn it’s hard to list even a good broad variety.

that’s my little ridiculously over-the-top excessive guide! i don’t think you’d really need to listen to all of these, just the ones that interest you. i hope this helps!