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This bee is licking sugar from a q-tip as part of a “proboscis extension reflex” assay.  This experiment, at a lab in Penn State University, is used to test the memory and learning ability of bees.  Researchers expose the restrained bee to a smell and then offer it a sugar reward.   Then after a pause, they expose the bee to the same smell and see if it sticks out its tongue (also called proboscis) in anticipation of the reward.  If it does, then you know is has learned to associate the smell with food. 

Researchers have used this test to show that very small amounts of pesticides and even “inactive" agricultural spray additives are harming bees’ ability to remember where their food is.

This bee was photographed for a story on honeybees in the May issue of National Geographic.

- Anand Varma (@anandavarma), National Geographic photographer

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Metalmark Moth (Brenthia sp., Choreutidae)

These tiny moths prance and pirouette around their private leafy dancefloors. In some species more than others, that flitty behavior on top of the metallic eyespots on their wings and the postures they are displayed at have been shown to mimic jumping spiders (Salticidae).

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu'er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

The Alabaster Nudibranch can be found in the temperate waters of the Pacific, from Alaska to California and along the coasts of Russia and Japan. The beautiful, wispy white tipped cerata are actually the animal’s lungs. But don’t let it’s delicate form fool you, this nudi’s jaws are strong enough to crack open the shell of a snail, one of its preferred meals - photo taken at Seattle, Washington