Living-Food

♡ Nice-cream ♡ blend frozen bananas, add sweetener and Ta Da! You can also add Powdered or regular tsp of peanut butter for peanut butter banana nice-cream Add cocoa powder for chocolate nice-cream or blend in raspberries/ strawberries for strawberry nice-cream or a sherbert like nice-cream!

(via Resilience.org)

The Woman Who Chose to Plant Corn

This really speaks to my path. I left academia for urban homesteading and a do-it-yourself, politically active lifestyle. Some quotes:

Not long ago, a Diné (Navajo) friend of mine, Lyla June Johnston, sent me a one-line email: “I am not going to Harvard… I am going to plant corn.”

Her statement signals a profound divergence from the path she’d set out on when she was an undergraduate at Stanford University. She is choosing instead to learn the lifeways of her culture, to become fluent in her language, to relearn traditional skills, to be intimate with the land.

It is often said that people like Lyla are role models for others of like background. Role models for what, though? For being bribed into complicity with the oppressor? For joining the world-devouring machine? For sacrificing local relationships and culture to the melting pot? Certainly, Lyla could rise high in the world symbolized by Harvard; she could become a professor herself one day, teaching young people anti-colonialist thinking.

Then there was the matter of a Harvard degree opening doors. The question is, doors to what? To be sure, many people today are more likely to listen to a native woman who also happens to be a Harvard PhD than to one who “only plants corn”. Certainly, it is the people of talent and worth that get to rise to positions of power, and those of lesser gifts and lower cultural development who must settle for the fields, the hearth, the humble realms, right?

Wrong. What we see as the locus of power in the world is an illusion, born of the theory of change that our cultural beliefs dictate. It is one kind of revolution to enter the halls of power with the intent to turn them against themselves; to (paraphrasing the Caribbean-American writer Audre Lord) use the master’s tools to dismantle the master’s house. It is a deeper kind of revolution to recognise the limitations of those tools, and to know that change might originate in the people and places we have seen as powerless. Lyla and the many people I meet like her no longer believe that the smart people at Harvard and Yale are going to find the answers and fix the world.

We are done with a world in which the logic of power is more important than the corn. When enough people live by that, the powerful will make different choices as well, in their role as barometers and channels of collective consciousness.

The best and brightest are abandoning the ship, and even those who remain aboard are participating half-heartedly as they sense the inevitable shipwreck. Eventually going through the motions of complicity becomes intolerable, as our hunger to live a meaningful life draws us towards a new and ancient story of interconnection, interbeing, and social, personal and ecological healing.

Ube Coconut Ice Cream

Ingredients needed
2 ¼ cup cashew milk, frozen
1 ½ cup cashews
½ cup water
½ cup blueberries
¼ cup coconut cream
2 tbsp ube powder (purple yam that has been grated and dehydrated into a powder) 
1 frozen banana 
1 tbsp coconut oil
1 tsp vanilla extract 
Borage flowers (to garnish)

Preparation
Add cashews and water in food processor and blend until smooth. Add banana and cashew milk and blend until smooth. I froze the cashew milk beforehand so that it would have a thicker texture. Add vanilla extract, coconut oil, ube powder, and blueberries. Blend until the mixture turns a light purple tint. Ready to serve. If you would like your ice cream to be more solid, store it in the freezer for several hours or as needed. I poured mine into a cake pop pan and left it in the freezer overnight. In the morning, I left it out for 10 minutes, scooped it out into a bowl, and garnished with borage. 

What is Ube? 
Ube is a root vegetable that is native to the Philippines. It is a bright purple color, and its relatives are taro and the Okinawa sweet potato. It is sometimes referred to as “purple yam.” In Filipino culture, ube is often used to make sweets and desserts. Ube has been around for many millennia and has been used throughout time as a laxative, treatment for fevers, hemorrhoids, gonorrhea, leprosy, and tumors, and a way to rid parasitic worms from the body.

LivingFoodLove

The most luscious watermelon the Deep South has ever produced was once so coveted, 19th-century growers used poison or electrocuting wires to thwart potential thieves, or simply stood guard with guns in the thick of night. The legendary Bradford was delectable — but the melon didn’t ship well, and it all but disappeared by the 1920s. Now, eight generations later, a great-great-great-grandson of its creator is bringing it back.

Saving The Sweetest Watermelon The South Has Ever Known

Photo: Heather Grilliot/Courtesy of Bradford Watermelons

ACAI BLUEBERRY NICECREAM with 🍓🍓🍓, plain yogurt, tahini and pistachios 😍 I don’t care how cold it is outside there’s always time for nicecream 🙊